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Architecture

We are an academic community composed of professors, practicing professionals and students dedicated to proposing viable solutions to contemporary problems of our society. Our pursuit of an alternate future is done within an environment of appreciation for our history, our regional realities and our participation within the greater global community.

Description

The School of Architecture, ARQPOLI, provides each student an opportunity to grow knowledgeable in the theoretical, technical, social, cultural, and practical aspects of the profession, and thus be able to enter and excel in the field. Towards such end, our balanced curriculum is both structured and flexible. It includes core professional courses, liberal arts, sciences, and mathematics, focusing on representational, verbal and written skills. The field of architecture requires the command of architectural design, theory, history, technology, structures, representation, and programmatic and pragmatic aspects related to practice.

The student’s understanding of Architecture, upon completion of the minimum graduation requirements, combines a broad social, cultural and technical foundation. Our program prepares students to face situations of considerable complexity, comprehensiveness and social responsibility, at the same time allowing for personal interests to mature in individually chosen fields. The curriculum integrates initiatives in Architectural Conservation, Sustainability, and Collaboration with the Community. Graduates of the program are thus expected to operate in a multidisciplinary approach to Architecture.

Degree Offered

The School of Architecture, ARQPOLI offers undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture (B.Arch), a Bachelor’s Degree in Interior Design, a Master ’s Degree in Landscape Architeture (M.Arch, the only one offered in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean Region).

Mission

Through joint intellectual, humanistic, creative and technical pursuits, the School of Architecture encourages individuals from diverse backgrounds to acquire the knowledge, skills and sense of social responsibility that are considered to be fundamental to a discipline concerned with the betterment of the human condition and the physical environment. By expounding an understanding of historical processes, rapidly-advancing technology and ever-present social predicaments, the school empowers students to exercise their potential for service, collaboration, creativity, productivity, leadership and civic engagement within society.

Objectives

Within a few years of graduation, the PUPR Architecture Program graduates are expected to attain the following:

  1. To uphold the contemporary relevance of a holistic understanding of Architecture, one that facilitates comprehension of how different professional components are interrelated and integrated.
  2. To further creative, critical and ethical stances framed within an understanding of multiculturalism, diversity and citizenship to best fulfill the basic demands of the architecture profession, if not transcend them.
  3. To nurture personal, intellectual, and professional skills and competencies needed to research, conceive, design, coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the construction of buildings and spaces.
  4. To increase technological knowledge and proficiency as fundamental to in-depth learning, professional performance, innovation and lifelong learning, all supported by scientific and quantitative reasoning.
  5. To foster information literacy and expertise in modes of communication (oral, written, graphic) as essential for the exchange of ideas, analysis, problem solving, collaboration, and knowledge transfer.
  6. To encourage initiatives that build up leadership and entrepreneurial dexterity in organizational skills related to planning, management, finances, the identification of business opportunities, and civic engagement.
  7. To promote a wide-scoped approach to social accountability, encompassing health and safety concerns, stewardship of the land, endorsement of sustainability practices, the ethical use of information, and the preservation of cultural and built legacies.
  8. To advance mutual trust between academia and practice, encouraging interaction with architects and representatives of the construction industry through collaborative research, team effort, interdisciplinary initiatives and community service.

Outcomes

The graduate of the Architecture Program will:

  1. Identify urban, spatial, and tectonic conceptions that are characteristic of the Caribbean Region to challenge the cultural vantage points and boundaries from which the architectural discipline has been so far understood in Puerto Rico.
  2. Articulate the limits and possibilities of the land and the regional landscape, as framed within society’s ecological obligations.
  3. Assess technology as myth, discourse, resource and possibility, given the Caribbean’s perennial (and sometimes questionable) efforts to contemporize.
  4. Illustrate the relevance, quality and dissemination of architectural research –formal, technical, historical, or cultural – as integral to professional practice.
  5. Compare and contest the prevailing modes and metaphors of our age and culture, remaining critically sensitive to change, transformations and evolving trends and ideals.
  6. Discuss past and prevailing architectural debates within the academy, the profession, and the community in general, engaging at the same time with other disciplines in the effort.
  7. Generate designs that fulfill society’s expectations regarding health and safety-related priorities and responsibilities, but also cost-effective and esthetic concerns.
  8. Contribute as a member in team and/or interdisciplinary efforts.

Graduates of the Architecture Program will have:


Critical Thinking and Representation

  • Ability to read, write, speak and listen effectively.
  • Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against relevant criteria and standards.
  • Ability to use appropriate representational media, such as traditional graphic and digital technology skills, to convey essential formal elements at each stage of the programming and design process.
  • Ability to make technically clear drawings, write outline specifications, and prepare models illustrating and identifying the assembly of materials, systems, and components appropriate for a building design.
  • Ability to gather, assess, record, apply, and comparatively evaluate relevant information within architectural coursework and design processes.
  • Ability to effectively use basic architectural and environmental principles in design.
  • Ability to examine and comprehend the fundamental principles present in relevant precedents and to make choices regarding the incorporation of such principles into architecture and urban design projects.
  • Understanding of the fundamentals of both natural and formal ordering systems and the capacity of each to inform two- and three-dimensional design.
  • Understanding of parallel and divergent canons and traditions of architecture, landscape and urban design including examples of indigenous, vernacular, local, regional, national settings from the Eastern, Western, Northern, and Southern hemispheres in terms of their climatic, ecological, technological, socioeconomic, public health, and cultural factors.
  • Understanding of the diverse needs, values, behavioral norms, physical abilities, and social and spatial patterns that characterize different cultures and individuals and the implication of this diversity on the societal roles and responsibilities of architects.
  • Understanding the role of applied research in determining function, form, and systems and their impact on human conditions and behavior.

Integrated Building Practices, Technical Skills and Knowledge

  • Ability to prepare a comprehensive program for an architectural project, such as preparing an assessment of client and user needs, an inventory of space and equipment requirements, an analysis of site conditions (including existing buildings), a review of the relevant laws and standards and assessment of their implications for the project, and a definition of site selection and design assessment criteria.
  • Ability to design sites, facilities, and systems to provide independent and integrated use by individuals with physical (including mobility), sensory, and cognitive disabilities.
  • Ability to design projects that optimize, conserve, or reuse natural and built resources, provide healthful environments for occupants/users, and reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations on future generations through means such as carbon-neutral design, bioclimatic design, and energy efficiency.
  • Ability to respond to site characteristics such as soil, topography, vegetation, and watershed in the development of a project design.
  • Ability to apply the basic principles of life-safety systems with an emphasis on egress.
  • Ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project that demonstrates each student’s capacity to make design decisions across scales while integrating the following SPC:
    • A.2. Design Thinking Skills
    • 
A.4. Technical Documentation
    • A.5. Investigative Skills
    • 
A.8. Ordering Systems
    • 
A.9. Historical Traditions and Global Culture
    • 
B.2. Accessibility
    • B.3. Sustainability
    • 
B.4. Site Design
    • 
B.5. Life Safety
    • 
B.8. Environmental Systems
    • 
B.9. Structural Systems
  • Understanding of the fundamentals of building costs, such as acquisition costs, project financing and funding, financial feasibility, operational costs, and construction estimating with an emphasis on life-cycle cost accounting.
  • Understanding the principles of environmental systems’ design such as embodied energy, active and passive heating and cooling, indoor air quality, solar orientation, daylighting and artificial illumination, and acoustics; including the use of appropriate performance assessment tools.
  • Understanding of the basic principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral forces and the evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural systems.
  • Understanding of the basic principles involved in the appropriate application of building envelope systems and associated assemblies relative to fundamental performance, aesthetics, moisture transfer, durability, and energy and material resources.
  • Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of building service systems such as plumbing, electrical, vertical transportation, security, and fire protection systems.
  • Understanding of the basic principles utilized in the appropriate selection of construction materials, products, components, and assemblies, based on their inherent characteristics and performance, including their environmental impact and reuse.

Realm C: Leadership and Practice

  • Ability to work in collaboration with others and in multidisciplinary teams to successfully complete design projects.
  • Understanding of the relationship between human behavior, the natural environment and the design of the built environment.
  • Understanding of the responsibility of the architect to elicit, understand, and reconcile the needs of the client, owner, user groups, and the public and community domains.
  • Understanding of the methods for competing for commissions, selecting consultants and assembling teams, and recommending project delivery methods.
  • Understanding of the basic principles of architectural practice management such as financial management and business planning, time management, risk management, mediation and arbitration, and recognizing trends that affect practice.
  • Understanding of the techniques and skills architects use to work collaboratively in the building design and construction process and on environmental, social, and aesthetic issues in their communities.
  • Understanding of the architect’s responsibility to the public and the client as determined by registration law, building codes and regulations, professional service contracts, zoning and subdivision ordinances, environmental regulation, and historic preservation and accessibility laws.
  • Understanding of the ethical issues involved in the formation of professional judgment regarding social, political and cultural issues in architectural design and practice.
  • Understanding of the architect’s responsibility to work in the public interest, to respect historic resources, and to improve the quality of life for local and global neighbors.


Enrollment

The institution has a minimum admission grade point average. However, these numbers are merely technical indicators that do not reflect the Program’s higher goal. As the second school of architecture established in the country, the program is conscious of its role of providing an alternative for architectural education. An open admission’s policy brings together a wide spectrum of ages, personal interests and academic backgrounds; some students might face educational challenges while others come with overachieving profiles. Both extremes and the large middle region are confronted since the first year with all the main questions and issues regarding architectural design, theory and practice. First year is often described as an extended interview or exam. Students have the opportunity to start fresh regardless of previous educational experiences and prove to themselves and to the school his/her aptitude, commitment, talent and discipline within a creative environment.

2009 – 2010 698
2010 – 2011 641
2011 – 2012 622
2012 – 2013 523

Graduation

 

2009 – 2012 32
2010 – 2011 40
2011 – 2012 58
2012 – 2013 62

Curriculum

Curriculum Sequence

Graduation Requirements

The School of Architecture, ARQPOLI offers undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture (B.Arch). To earn the degree, the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  • 27 Credit-hours in Developmental Studies
  • 27 Credit-hours in Socio-Humanistic Studies and Languages
  • 9 Credit-hours in Mathematics and Sciences
  • 117 Credit-hours in Professional Core Courses
  • 33 Credit-hours in Electives
  • 213 Total Credit-Hours
  • 149 Total Credit-hours

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES: All students who apply and are admitted to the Architecture School must show evidence that they have acquired the necessary academic abilities and skills to make the most of the curriculum. Those not demonstrating the command of these abilities and skills (as reflected by results of their College Entrance Examination Board Test and SAT; results in Polytechnic University’s placement tests; previous university experience; or other ad hoc tests and criteria) will be required to take developmental courses to overcome the deficiencies in Languages, Mathematics and Science. These developmental courses (equivalent to a maximum of 27 credit-hours) are in addition to the 186 credits required by the Architecture Program, for a total of 213 credit-hours. The developmental courses are awarded their corresponding credits according to contact hours, as follows:

 

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES COMPONENT
(MAXIMUM OF 27 CREDIT-HOURS)
ATUL 0100 Adjustment to University Life 3
ENGL 0100 Preparatory English 3
ENGL 0110 English Grammar 3
SPAN 0100 Preparatory Spanish 3
SPAN 0110 Spanish Grammar 3
MATH 0102 Preparatory Mathematics 3
MATH 0106 Elementary Algebra 3
MATH 0110 Intermediate Algebra 3
SCIE 0110 Introduction to Physics 3

In order to register in any Professional Core Courses, students must have approved MATH 0102 Preparatory Mathematics. They must also have approved three credit-hours in either ENGL.

Course Description

ARCC 0100- SPATIAL VISUALIZATION
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisites: None
Elemental techniques of representing space are introduced. Geometry, as projected three dimensionally, allows students to manipulate form, shadows and projections. Explanation of techniques for depicting spatial relationships are included as part of the course.

 

ARCC 0120- CYBERPUBLICATIONS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisites: None Introduction to the operative mechanisms of the Internet and the Web’s potential as a vehicle for architectural expression and research. Visual techniques are explored to increase the effectiveness of cyberspace’s interactive potential.

 

ARCC 0130- BASIC DIGITAL GRAPHICS AND ARCHITECTURAL PRESENTATIONS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour Lecture/laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: ARCC 2010

Introduction to the basic concepts, software and techniques for developing architectural presentations. The course main focus in on drawing manipulation, basic rendering techniques, printing, board layout and design using the digital tools currently available.

 

ARCC 0140- COLLAGE MAKING + DESIGN STUDIO
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1020, ARCC 1010
This course explores the origins of collage, its use in various movements of both art and architecture, how influenced and continue to influenced one another, as well as an intense material investigation.

 

ARCC 0150- DRAWING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Diverse drawing techniques and a variety of media are introduced. Gesture and movement are explored at different scales in relationship to graphic space. Personal expression is validated as integral to the process.

 

ARCC 0160- ANTHROPOMORPHIC AWARENESS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
An introduction to the processes of observation, recognition and control of the human body in space. Everyday movement and basic manifestations of habitation are used as point of departure for the creation and interpretation of personal movement.

 

ARCC 0170- PERSPECTIVE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCC 1010
The techniques for graphic construction of three-dimensional space, both as representational and design tool are presented. Free-hand sketching and one and two point constructions are explored.

 

ARCC 0180- 3D EXPLORATION
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1010
Different artistic techniques and materials, methods and procedures are explored in search of representational effectiveness and the successful communication of ideas and concepts.

 

ARCC 0190- ARCHITECTURE AND SOCIAL MEDIA
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1020, ARCC 2010
Introduction to the basic principles of web-based Social Media platforms and its potential uses in the development of Architecture as a multivalent profession. This knowledge will allow students to help visualize new trends in design matters, market the profession and help Architects to fully integrate into the mainstream in order to influence society in more effective ways.

 

ARCC 0202- SKETCHING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Experimentation with analytical methods for representing the essence of an architectural work through free-hand sketching, focusing on diverse scales and techniques, and drawing on location.

 

ARCC 0210- PHOTOGRAPHY FUNDAMENTALS
Three credit-hours. Two one-hour lectures. Prerequisite: None Corequisite: ARCC 0211
Introduction to black & white photography, its history and pertinence to Architecture, emphasizing composition, pinhole camera design, and camera manipulation as tools to understand and explore the representation of space.

 

ARCC 0211- PHOTOGRAPHY LABORATORY
Zero credit-hours. One two-hour laboratory period per week. Laboratory Fee. Corequisite: ARCC 0210
This course is taken simultaneously with ARCC 0210, focusing on hands-on experience in laboratory techniques, including familiarity with the basic chemistry of negatives. Developing and printing are understood as processes that can be influenced by creative manipulation.

 

ARCC 0220- SET DESIGN
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1030

Plays are studied and interpreted to render spatial solutions for the stage, akin to both interpretation and realization. Design explorations include experimentation with light, materials and textures. Tectonic and symbolic dimensions of scenery are emphasized, as well as construction concerns.

 

ARCC 0240- INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Product design is conceived as a vehicle for introducing students to analytical thinking in relationship to the practicality of materials, descriptions and other concerns related to industrial design.

 

ARCC 0250– SCULPTURE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Form in space and three-dimensional thinking are tested against the wide array of materials with which shapes and volumes -but also ideas and concepts- become present in a specific surrounding.

 

ARCC 0310- COLOR FOR ARCHITECTS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Color, tone, value and hue are discussed in relationship to theories of perception. Changing psychological and cultural interpretations are examined; practical applications are explored and debated.

 

ARCC 0315- CERAMICS
Three credit-hours. One four-hour studio per week. Prerequisite: None
Introduction to basic techniques for hand-building with clay: modeling, slab construction, coiling, draping and mold-making for small-scale production of tiles, textures, finishes and objects where clay becomes a malleable membrane that encloses space.

 

ARCC 0330- INSTALLATIONS
Three credit-hours. One four-hour studio per week. Prerequisite: None
A critical analysis of our evolving media culture, examining the nature and functions of it in diverse contexts. Students produce installations as creative comments reflecting the reshaping of contemporary cultural systems.

ARCC 0340- PUBLIC SPEAKING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisite: None
Oral communication is understood as a tool for conveying ideas accurately. Students plan, rehearse and evaluate public presentations after being exposed to exercises pertaining thematic organization, diction, and voice projection. Video becomes a tool for self-assessment.

 

ARCC 0401- COLOR & RENDERING

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week.
Prerequisites: ARCC 2010, ARCH 2030
Advanced techniques for representation of architectural space are introduced, including perspective construction, shades, shadows, reflections and textures. Color and different techniques for its application are studied; related work by other architects is examined. 3

 

ARCC 0403- ADVANCED COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN AND DRAFTING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. Laboratory Fee.

Prerequisite: ARCC 2010, ARCH 2010
Introduction to the concepts for the creation of 3D Architectural Models Database and the extraction of bidimensional drawing. The course main focus in on 3D model development, drawing linking and basic rendering techniques using building information modeling (BIM) software.

 

ARCC 0404- 3D COMPUTER STUDIO
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCC 0130, ARCH 2010
Introduction to the concepts of 2D and 3D rendering and animation. The course main focus is on 3D rendering techniques, 3D animation concepts, advanced 2D drawing rendering, 2D animation using the digital tools currently available.

 

ARCC 0410- PARAMETRIC MODELING AND DIGITAL FABRICATION
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCC 2010
This course explores three-dimensional design with parametric modeling at the same time develop their education in digital technologies to materials properties Through a series of short exercises the student will learn digital fabrication techniques that will serve as models of exploration for an installation to be fabricated in real scale.

 

ARCC 1010- ARCHITECTURAL REPRESENTATION I
Three credit-hours, Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1010, ARHH 1010
Basic drawing, drafting, and recording, techniques in pencil are introduced as tools for visual and technical communication, all considered to be essential to the architect’s trade and expression.

 

ARCC 2010- BASIC COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING: BASIC CAD Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCC 1010, ARCH 1020

Introduction to the basic concepts, software and drawing techniques for digital drafting. The course main focus is on bidimensional drawings, its representation and basic 3D modeling using the digital tools currently available.

 

ARCH 0100- DESIGN ABROAD
Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory Periods per week and a trip. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: By approval
The history, urbanism, architecture, geography and culture of a given country or city are studied as part of the course prior to actual travel to the place. Exercises undertaken before the trip exposes students to background historical information, on-site sketching and enhanced analytical experiences.

 

ARCH 0203- DESIGN SEMINAR
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCH 1030
Principles of design are addressed in short exercises in which the students use previous projects to confront different skills related to proportions, composition, structural logic, sequence, and materiality.

 

ARCH 0210- COLLABORATIVE DESIGN STUDIO
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCH 1020, ARCC 1010
The purpose of this workshop is to introduce architecture students to the use of the spaces they project in a collective environment. Students will learn from the experience of people (inhabitants/users/clients with whom they will collaborate) in the spaces they inhabit and take into account their needs, their aspirations and their knowledge about the place when designing.

 

ARCH 0290- INDEPENDENT STUDY
Two credit-hours. One-one and a half hour lecture/laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite: By approval
The course offers the opportunity to formulate and investigate projects of personal interest, or regional relevance pertinent to the school’s possible contributions to the profession and to society, broadening the relatively fixed structure of the curriculum.

 

ARCH 0391- LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studios per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: ARCH2020, ARTE 3010.
Earth manipulation and use of vegetation are addressed along with other landscape strategies at both urban and rural scales. Soils, drainage systems, plant materials and ecological concerns are underlined as integral to the development of contemporary projects.

 

ARCH 0499- VERTICAL STUDIO
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/ studios per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisite: By approval

An elective design studio for ad-hoc topics to be explored as a complement to the required courses in this area, according to the shared interests of the teachers and students from different levels. This course may substitute for a required design course, by approval.

 

ARCH 1010- BASIC DESIGN I
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite:MATH 0102 and one of two language courses, SPAN 0100 or ENGL 0100; Corequisite: ARHH 1010
Introduction to basic design elements, principles and concerns, focusing on spatial organization. Problem solving and analytical models become tools to understand underlying compositional principles.

 

ARCH 1020- BASIC DESIGN II
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1010, ARHH 1011; Corequisite: ARCC 1010
Spatial organization, form, structure, and figure-ground gestalt issues are explored through geometry in projects developed from two-dimensional graphic design into three dimensional architectural abstractions.

 

ARCH 1030- BASIC DESIGN III
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1020, ARCC 1010
Notion of contexts are analyzed as an introduction to the complexities inherent to architecture and place. Precedents are examined in order to link programmatic concerns and formal composition, in order to integrate them in design.

 

ARCH 2010- DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS I
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 1030, ARCT 1010, ARCT 1011, ARTE 1010, ATUL 0I00
Plan, section and elevation are jointly manipulated to expound architecture’s three dimensional possibilities. Circulation and spatial sequence, structure, enclosure and tectonics are simultaneously considered in the genesis of form.

 

ARCH 2020- DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS II
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Pre-requisite: ARCH 2010, ENGL 0110, SPAN 0110 and MATH O110.
Projects of intermediate complexity are related to the larger backdrop of culture and themes related to identity politics. The appropriateness of concept to form and context is emphasized, as well as the architect’s larger responsibilities to his/her work in society.

 

ARCH 2030- DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS III

Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisites: ARCH 2020, ARTE 2010
Design development addresses site orientation, building envelope issues, and detail as pertinent to these. Precedents expound programmatic complexity and design concerns are pursued at various scales within the project.

 

ARCH 3010- INTERMEDIATE DESIGN I
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 2030, ARHH 2010, ARHH 2011
Design is related to structures of historical significance and issues of contemporary and traditional vocabularies. Preservation theory, legislation and programming, building pathology and hands-on exercises with materials are integral to the course.

 

ARCH 3020- INTERMEDIATE DESIGN II
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite: ARCH 3010, ARCC 2010
Design methods are highlighted, exploring techniques used to articulate the components of an architectural project. Problem-solving is confronted from different angles of understanding in an introspective, critical manner.

 

ARCH 3030- INTERMEDIATE DESIGN III: MID- CAREER RESEARCH
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half-hour lecture/ studio periods per week.
Prerequisites: ARCH 3020, ARPP 3010, ARHH 3010, SOHU 2010 A project investigation of limited focus is developed, reflecting each student’s specific concerns related to architecture, locus and culture. Discussions and readings on information- gathering theories and techniques facilitate the definition of individual research objectives.

 

ARCH 4010- ADVANCED DESIGN I
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite:ARCH 3030, ARTE 3010, ARST 3010
Housing and urbanism are confronted in a term-long project. Typological housing precedents and social issues are framed against the economic and political background which both fosters and hinders housing.

 

ARCH 4020- ADVANCED DESIGN II
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite:ARCH 4010 Urban design is considered from a two-fold approach: one, the ecologically minded posture; the other, based on historic and prevalent urban design ideas both to be expanded and contested in studio. Present-day urban problems in Latin America are customarily addressed.

 

ARCH 4030- ADVANCED DESIGN III

Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite: ARCH 4020, ARTE 4010, ARTE 4020, ARST 3020
A term-long project addresses the integration of the multiple disciplines: programming, design, technology and structures come together in an all-encompassing problem that elucidates the multilayered nature of architecture.

 

ARCH 5010- CAPSTONE DESIGN I
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 4030, HIST 3012, HISTORY OR THEORY ELECTIVE (0400 LEVEL); SOHU 2020, ENGL 2010, SPAN 2010, ARTE 4010, ARTE 4020, ARST 3010, ARST 3020, ARST 4010
At this first phase of the Capstone Design Project, parameters, objectives and methodologies to be pursued are defined. A written document to guide the design phase of the project is developed through research and debate.

 

ARCH 5020- CAPSTONE DESIGN II
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite: ARCH 5010, ARST 4020
The second Capstone course requires the development of a comprehensive preliminary design to reflect the accomplishment of goals stated in ARCH 5010. Design development issues regarding conceptual and tectonic interpretation are incorporated to a final presentation.

 

ARCH 5030- CAPSTONE DESIGN III
Four credit-hours. Two three-and-a-half hour lecture/studio periods per week. Laboratory Fee. Prerequisite:ARCH 5020 The course culminates the Capstone Design sequence with attention to the technical resolution of the project and its (re)presentation. This all-inclusive final project mirrors the student’s acquired skills, maturity and expanded professional outlook.

 

ARCL 0100- CITY & ENVIRONMENT
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1010
The course introduces the themes of city, tourism, and architecture. It emphasizes environmental pollution and urban development sustainability. Field trips constitute a fundamental tool to illustrate the thematic contents of the course.

ARCL 0315- GEOGRAPHY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: ARCH 1030
An introduction to basic and interdisciplinary concepts pertaining to geography and its diverse fields of reach. Tools for spatial and social understanding of context in contemporary society are presented and valued.

 

ARCT 0110- VISUAL CULTURE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: None

Theories of vision and representation nurture refection, debate and exercises related to the construction of images in contemporary culture. Modes of perception that have influenced human communication in the past are discussed.

 

ARCT 0430- CONSERVATION THEORY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 3010, ARHH 3010
Ideas and theories linked with preservation ideals are presented and debated upon. Aspiration versus realization within the conservation field becomes the background against which the history of building and rebuilding is examined.

 

ARCT 0440- ADVANCED TOPICS ON THEORY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020, ARHH 3010
Architectural design history and theories foster debate and criticism of works and ideas of architects and architectural theorists throughout time, nurturing an understanding of the different ideologies interweaving with Architecture.

 

ARCT 1010- INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL THEORY Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week. Prerequisite: ARCC 1010, ARCH 1020 Corequisite: ARCT 1011 A critical exposition of architectural thinking throughout time, examining selected treatises of architectural theory from Classical antiquity to the 19th century. Attention is given to the sociopolitical contexts in which ideas were generated.

 

ARCT 1011- ARCHITECTURAL THEORY LABORATORY
Zero credit-hour. One one-hour recitation period per
week. Prerequisite: ARCH 1020 Corequisite: ARCT 1010
Small group discussion sessions allow students to expand and debate upon the subjects addressed at lectures in the co- required course. Written submittals and projects are individually commented in these meetings.

 

ARHH 0410- SELECTED TOPICS ON MODERN ARCHITECTURE Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARHH 3010
Precedents, cultural contexts, key figures and seminal texts most representative of the Modern Movement’s aspirations and its ideological pursuits are discussed. Apperceptions of the movement’s impact around the world are debated upon.

 

ARHH 0440- ADVANCED TOPICS ON HISTORY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: HIST 3510
A specific architectural period or movement become the object of analysis, taking into account the cultural background against which it developed. Ideas are examined in relation to time frames of public endorsement, reasons for dissemination and eventual disfavor.

 

ARHH 1010- HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURAL SPACE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture period per week, Prerequisite: MATH 0102 and one of two language courses, SPAN 0100 or ENGL 0100 Corequisite: ARHH 1011

A survey to introduce the history of Architecture, including basic elements of architectural design, composition, form- making and spatial concepts, all examined against the historical and natural forces that have influenced the art of building.

 

ARHH 1011- HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE LABORATORY
Zero credit-hour. One one-hour recitation period per week. Prerequisite: MATH 0102 and one of two language courses, SPAN 0100 or ENGL 0100 Co-requisite: ARHH 1010 Small-group discussion sessions allow students to expand and debate upon the subjects addressed at lectures in the co- required course and go beyond these. Required projects are individually reviewed in these meetings.

 

ARHH- 2010 HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per
week. Prerequisite: ARHH 1010/1011; ARCT 1010/1011 Corequisite: ARHH 2011
Links between the romantic and rationalist outlooks of the 18th Century, together with the fragmentation and simultaneity of the end of the 20th century are addressed. The architectural production and theories expounded elucidate the ruptures and continuities of a non-linear history. 33

 

ARHH 2011- HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURELABORATORY
Zero credit-hours. One-hour recitation period per week. Corequisite: ARHH 2010
Small group discussion sessions allow students to expand and debate upon the subjects addressed at lectures in the co- required course. Written submittals and oral presentations are individually commented in these meetings.

 

ARHH – 3010 NEO-AVANT-GARDE AND THE CONTEMPORARY SCENE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARHH 2010/2011Corequisite: None

The discursive wear and tear of the modern movement in architecture, experienced during the 1960’s gave way to a number of theoretical proposals and models of practice with a profound impact on architectural thinking. The result of this body of work, decentralized and stray, found in the 1970’s and 1980’s a space for further development, giving architecture an unusual cultural role.

 

ARPP 0310- THE ARCHITECT AS ENTREPRENEUR
Three credit-hours. One two-hour lecture period per Week. Prerequisite: None
Pursuing an understanding of the architect as entrepreneur, the course addresses the analysis and management of concepts and skills that assist the design professional in assuming leadership in practice by becoming knowledgeable of the multiple conditions and processes that influence the construction industry.

 

ARPP 1010- INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE

Three credit-hours. One two-hour lecture period per Week. Prerequisite: None
Introduction to fundamental topics of human perception as a point of reference in architectural design. Basic concepts are explored in order to discuss the parameters of interaction between human body and its constructed context and space.

 

ARPP 3010- PRACTICE/EXPERIENCE
Three credit-hours. One two-hour lecture period per week; field time by arrangement.
Prerequisite: ARCH 2020
Real-life office experience grants a glance at professional procedures in architectural practice and related fields, while a classroom overview provides the necessary reference for understanding processes ranging from proposal preparation to project close-out.

 

ARPP 5010- ETHICS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020
An introduction to moral dilemmas inherent to professional practice, considering wide-ranging implications of ethics in a globalized society where disciplines overlap, but also obscure responsibilities. Case studies of professional interest are researched and debated.

 

ARPP 5020- CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: ARCH 4010, ARST 4020, ARTE 4010, ARTE 4020 Exposure to the breadth and depth of documentation required for any architectural project and the development of its construction drawings and specifications. Cost estimates complement the proposed design.

 

ARPP 5030- OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND FINANCES
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCH 3020
The role of the practitioner – scope, duties, and potential – is questioned from different standpoints: ethical, financial and managerial. Personnel organization, supervision, office procedures, payments for services, marketing and career options are examined.

 

ARST 0410- ADVANCED TOPICS ON STRUCTURES
Three credit-hours. One two-hour lecture period per week. Prerequisite: ARST 4020
Comprehensive outlook of different structural systems when exposed to extreme conditions both internal and external, like earthquakes, hurricanes, and flooding.

 

ARST 3010- STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS I
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: ARTE 2010, SCIE 2410
Statics, strength of materials and basic analysis of simple structural elements provide a framework for understanding architecture in terms of the analysis of systems of forces and the laws of equilibrium.

 

ARST 3020- STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS II
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARST 3010
As a continuation to ARST 3010, topics addressed include: stress and strain due to axial, bending and torsion loads, shear and bending moments and diagrams. Tension and compression stresses in beams are also discussed

 

ARST 4010- STRUCTURES III: STEEL
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARST 3020
The properties of steel are discussed as issues of combined axial compression and bending are presented, including the behavior of steel structural beams and columns with and without lateral support. Existing structures are analyzed in these terms.

 

ARST 4020- STRUCTURES IV: CONCRETE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARST 4010
Design of reinforced concrete structures following the ultimate strength method is aimed at developing safe, economical and efficient design stances regarding reinforced concrete beams, columns and one-way slabs, according to A.C.I. codes.

 

ARTE 0400A – CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/studio periods per week. Prerequisites: ARTE 4020,
In this course, the students will be exposed to the wide range of documents conventionally handled by the Architects and Interior Designers in the process to achieve the development of a project and construction of the building. This includes drawings and specifications, cost estimates, permit forms, shop drawings, certifications for payment, change orders quotes and contract modifications procedures, among others. Considering the availability of computer software commonly used to assist the architect and Interior Designers in this task, the course examines and introduces the different programs and templates available for the preparation of these documents.

 

ARTE 0401- WOOD TECHNOLOGY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARST 3020
Wood’s properties and possibilities as a construction material are expounded. Lumber types, framing systems, and typical connections are examined in relationship to load transfer and wind stresses, granting special attention to hurricane impact and termite control. 34

 

ARTE 0410- PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites:, ARCH 3010, ARTE 3010
Technical aspects pursuant to historic preservation are discussed and demonstrated through laboratory problems. Materials used in restoration, rehabilitation and conservation projects are tested and weathered to consider short and long range effects of their use.

 

ARTE 0430- ECOLOGICAL TERRACES
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week.
Prerequisite: ARCH 3030, ARTE 2010
Environmental and technological issues pertaining urban naturation and ecological or green surfaces are presented from both theoretical and practical as pects. Case studies from Europe, as well as local ones, are analyzed.

 

ARCC 0440- ARCHITECTURE LIGHT & LIGHTING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture/laboratory periods per week.
Prerequisite: ARCH 2030, ARTE 2010
Light is analyzed as a compositional and psychological device. Its effect in indoor and outdoor space is examined and complemented by the creation of atmospheres through the use of different lighting typologies. Students design a lighting device for which a prototype is built.

 

ARTE 0400A- CONSTRUCTION DETAILS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: ARCH 3010, ARTE 3010.
This course addresses the importance of the constructive knowledge of the architect and interior architect in the process of architectural design; achieving innovative and varied designs and at the same time reduce energy consumption and avoid contamination.

 

ARTE 0400B- INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: NONE
This course is an introduction to the profession of interior architecture and its importance within the construction industry and our society. It will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the role of the interior architect, the creative and technical scope of the profession, the responsibilities that it entails and the close relationship it must maintain with other professions for the success of any interior architecture project.

 

ARTE 0451- ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION LABORATORY Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Laboratory Fee.
Prerequisites: ARCH 3010, ARTE 3010.

Through a series of field and scientific laboratory exercises the student expands the knowledge of traditional building materials. The course includes class lectures, site visits, documentation, condition survey and collection of field samples and laboratory experiments.

 

ARTE 1010- INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: ARCH 1010, ARHH 1010
An early overview of building technologies (structural, plumbing, HVAC, electricity and site work) that work as a system affecting architectural design, focusing on the designer’s challenge to coordinate all elements in a coherent project.

 

ARTE 2010- MATERIALS AND METHODS
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARCC 1010, ARCH 1030, ARTE 1010
Materials, their history, and their application to construction technology are studied, including characteristics, behavior, manufacturing, conventions, standards, and restrictions. Issues of assembly are addressed regarding building envelope systems.

 

ARTE 3010- SITE PLANNING
Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisites: ARCH 2020, ARTE 2010
The placement of building on land is confronted from different perspectives: geographic, climatic, geologic, topographic and ecological. Attention is focused on the man-made world impacting the natural realm as, it pertains, specifically, to site infrastructure.

 

ARTE 4010- ELECTRICITY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARTE 3010
Electrical power systems and lighting are examined to ascertain their application to different types of projects. Performance, adaptability, flexibility and code compliance of these applications are considered, including comparative costs.

 

ARTE 4020- ENVIRONMENTAL AND MECHANICAL SYSTEMS Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: ARTE 3010, ARST 3010
Examination of basic support systems in buildings includes attention to plumbing, ventilation, air conditioning, vertical transportation, security, fire protection and acoustics. Versatility, applicable codes, related costs and limitations are analyzed.

Laboratories

The School of Architecture includes a Computers Laboratory, Photography, Materials and Digital Fabrication Laboratory and a Ceramics Studio for student and faculty use. An Architectural Conservation Laboratory provides mechanisms to explore related subjects with a primary focus on the Caribbean Region. The School is currently committed to research on architectural conservation techniques. In addition, the School benefits from the availability of additional laboratories in the Civil Engineering Department on campus: a Soils’ Mechanics Laboratory, a Materials’ Laboratory, and a Mechanics of Materials’ Laboratory. These strengthen the Technology and Structures components.

The School of Architecture includes a:


Architectural Conservation Lab

Claudia C. Rosa López / crosa@pupr.edu

The Architectural Conservation Laboratory at the Polytechnic University is designed and equipped to safely handle ten students and a small research group at any one time. Comparative collections and reference inventories of basic raw materials are maintained within these research facilities. Students are versed in scientific analytical procedures relevant to interventions into the built environment. They are also trained in the proper and safe use of scientific analytical equipment and materials. Participating students are provided with opportunities to carry out the evaluation of a historic building from sampling to the development of compatible repair mixes. The students are also trained in microscopic examination, the reading of qualitative characteristics of raw building materials, and the ability to analytically discern changes through time.Photography, Materials and Digital Fabrication Laboratory and a Ceramics’ Laboratory for student and faculty use. An Architectural Conservation Laboratory provides mechanisms to explore related subjects with a primary focus on the Caribbean Region. The School is currently committed to research on architectural conservation techniques. In addition, the School benefits from the availability of additional laboratories in the Civil Engineering Department on campus: a Soils’ Mechanics Laboratory, a Materials’ Laboratory, and a Mechanics ofMaterials’ Laboratory. These strengthen the Technology and Structures components.

ComputerS LAB

Emil Méndez Berrios / emendez@pupr.edu

The Two Computer LAB are available to students, a classrooms and a work laboratory open to all ARQPOLI students 7 days a week during specific schedules. The main lab is used as a classroom, where all computer- related courses (CAD I, CAD II, Photoshop and Digital Imaging, and 3D Studio) are taught. The second lab is open on a limited schedule to students, serving as a support facility for all other courses; internet access and plotters are available in this room. The lab is equipped with thirteen (13) computers, programs (ACAD 2007, Draft Sight, ArchiCAD14, Sketchup, Artlantis Studio, Rhinoceros, CS5 Adobe [limited edition], Adobe Professional and Microsoft Office 2010), 3 42” HP Plotters, a scanner and two (2) Toshiba Multi-function printers with a printing station. There are three (3) additional 42” HP plotters available in several of the Capstone courses offices.

Materials Workshop

Roberto Pérez Dendariarena / rperez@pupr.edu

The workshop was created in order to provide students a fully stocked and safe facility for working diverse materials. The workshop is where ideas are converted into tangible realities. From the start of a student’s career studies, the workshop constitutes a support facility with the opportunity to develop skills in craftsmanship with the use of industrial equipment designed to transform and assemble materials. The Workshop contains hand tools, power tools and metal working equipment which students can use to produce objects and models required for their courses and research. Students are trained in basic security aspects before authorized use of these facilities. The facility functions as an experimental lab, classroom, and reference area where the recycling of discarded materials is promoted. The administration and operation of the workshop is under the direction of an architect who serves as director, together with the assistance of students under the work-study program.

Digital Fabrication Lab

Edilberto Ocasio Rosado / eocasio@pupr.edu

The recently established Digitial Fabrication Lab is located on the second floor of the School, adjacent to the Digital Meida Archive. The Lab is equipped with a large format laser cutter together with the hardware and software needed to operate it. The Lab supports the course curriculum, in particular, the Visual Studies program. Current (ARCC 0410 Digital Fabrication) and future courses will integrate the use of the Lab. As part of the School’s expansion/remodeling project, the Lab will be relocated within the Fabrication Lab. The Lab will be provided with additional equipment, inculding a large format laser cutter and a 48″ x 96″ computer numerical controlled (CNC) router.

Photography Lab

This laboratory is equipped to support the Photography course, but also conceived for reproducing visual material (plans, photos, models) for faculty and students. The laboratory includes three spaces: the printing area, the film development lab, and the photography studio.

Digital Media Archive

Cristina M. Parrilla Navarro / cparrilla@pupr.edu

The Digital Media Archive, formerly known as the Media Lab, is a controlled facility that serves primarily as the School’s institutional digital memory and database. It stores academic works such as: Mid-career research papers, Capstone projects, think-tank products and other research ventures. Among other things: a slide image collection, lectures’ videos, photographs, ARQPOLI’s publications and a small digital collection of architectural books and magazines. It also serves as home to the program’s webpage headquarter and the graphic design studio responsible for the schools’ graphic identity and the diffusion of news and promotional information on the program. This facility houses 5 personal computer workstations with access to five main computers, which are used both by students and professors for research in the fields of architecture, graphic arts and digital technologies as support for the academic and studio work. The archive serves also as a digital reading room. As a long-term plan, we envision the archive to become an integrated information hub (comprising the library, the engineering departments and other external resources), to become a more comprehensive center for research and information sharing within the student body, the faculty and the general public. The archive is part of the institutional computer main system.

Products Library

Smyrna Maurás Modesti / smauras@pupr.edu

The purpose of the Products Library is to maintain reference samples and catalogs of different materials and products used in the finishing of building walls, floors, ceilings, for both interior or exterior use such as: stones, wood, steel, paint, glass, acrylics, acoustic materials, ceiling tiles, floor and wall tiles, furniture for office and home, hospitals and schools, hotels and restaurants and textiles for different uses. This library will allow the students to touch and experience the materials and products available to them for use in architecture, interior architecture and design projects enhancing and completing the learning experience while at school.

Housing, Urbanism and Planning Workshop

Sara T. Aponte Meléndez / saponte@pupr.edu

This laboratory is developing a study proposal of the Hispanic Caribbean in collaboration with other institutions in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Cuba. A proposal titled “A Lakou for Haiti (Un Lakou para Haiti), which was organized by the ArqPoli Chapter of the American Institute of Students of Architecture (AIAS) is evidence of the commitment the School has to address relevant themes of current events.

Contact Us

The School of Architecture | ArqPoli

Carlos E. Betancourt Llambías, AIA, Dean
cbetancourt@pupr.edu

Diana Rivera Rivera, Associate Dean
drivera@pupr.edu

Maribel Rijos, Auxiliary Dean
mrijos@pupr.edu

Giannina Rios, Assistant to the Dean
grios@pupr.edu

Tel: 787.622.8000 x 417 / 451
Fax: 787.767.0607
P.O. Box 192017 San Juan, Puerto Rico 00919-2017