Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineers research, design and evaluate machines, devices, equipment, systems and processes, and plan and oversee their development, installation, operation and maintenance. Our program is committed to educate the best Mechanical Engineers in Puerto Rico through an effective integration of classroom theory and highly practical applications. Our curriculum provides the opportunity to complete the B.S. in Mechanical Engineering degree in 4 years.

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Undergraduate Program Description

Mechanical engineers use the fundamental principles of energy, material sciences, and mechanics in the design and production of mechanical devices and systems. Mechanical engineers are heavily involved in the generation, conversion and transmission of energy and motion. The program is suited for students with a keen interest in applied physical sciences and mathematics. It is designed to prepare our graduates to face with success the new challenges of the industry and to benefit our society.


The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.) covers the fundamental aspects of the field, stresses basic principles and educates students to solve engineering problems. The curriculum integrates advanced computer skills, laboratory work and design projects in a teamwork setting throughout the program. The freshman and sophomore years emphasize courses in mathematics, sciences, humanities, computer programming, computer-aided drafting and design, conventional manufacturing, engineering mechanics, material sciences, solid mechanics and fluid mechanics. The junior and senior years are dedicated to the study of thermodynamics, heat transfer, intermediate fluid mechanics, system dynamics and controls, mechatronics, thermal and mechanical design, computer-aided engineering, computer aided-manufacturing. The program concludes with comprehensive capstone design courses in which the students apply the knowledge and concepts from previous courses in solving relevant problems from the industry.


Mechanical engineering students may decide to follow a traditional mechanical engineering path or to pursue a concentration in aerospace engineering. Students following the traditional path may take elective courses in areas such as air conditioning systems, power plant engineering, internal combustion engines, turbomachinery, manufacturing, robotics, vibrations, dynamics of machinery, biomedical engineering, plastics engineering or any of the courses that are part of the concentration in aerospace engineering. The traditional course sequence also includes a course in entrepreneurship to enhance the business skills and self-employment opportunities of our graduates. Students enrolled in the B.S.M.E. with a concentration in Aerospace Engineering will take courses in aerospace-related areas such as aerodynamics, flight dynamics, propulsion systems, aerospace structures, and aircraft design.

Careers

Mechanical engineers have many professional options due to the breadth of their preparation. Mechanical engineers can work in design, research and development, manufacturing, service and maintenance, as well as technical sales. Mechanical engineers can pursue their careers with local, state, and federal agencies, as well as with private enterprises, or even organize their own businesses. Graduates from this program have found successful careers in a variety of industries such as aerospace, pharmaceuticals, electric utilities, electronics, medical devices, air conditioning, food industry, mechanical services among others. Mechanical engineering graduates may also elect to pursue advanced degrees in engineering, or continue their education in other fields, such a law or business.

Degree Offered

The Mechanical Engineering program offers undergraduate instruction leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.). This program requires 147 credit-hours.

Students pursuing the B.S.M.E. degree with a concentration in Aerospace Engineering take three additional credit-hours for a total of 150 credit-hours.

Mission

The Mechanical Engineering program at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico is designed to develop graduates from different backgrounds who can deal with situations that involve technological and humanistic/societal issues and to cultivate their potential for leadership.

The program emphasizes on developing the ability and competency of our students in utilizing scientific and engineering methods for devising useful products to satisfy the community in an economical way, while considering the impacts on society.

Program Educational Objectives

Mechanical engineering graduates at Polytechnic University are expected to pursue (within a few years) a successful career in thermal and mechanical systems

  • in a technical engineering path
  • in an engineering management path
  • in research and development
  • as a self-employed entrepreneur

Student Outcomes

Every graduating mechanical engineer from our program shall be able to demonstrate:

1. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics

2. an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors

3. an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

4. an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts

5. an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives

6. an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions

7. an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Graduation Data

ACADEMIC YEAR DEGREE AWARDED
2018-2019 3
2017-2018 0
2016-2017 0
2015-2016 0
2014-2015 0

Enrollment

ACADEMIC YEAR ENROLLMENT
2018-2019 41
2017-2018 29
2016-2017 22
2015-2016 12
2014-2015 5

Mechanical Engineering Program Curriculms

BS.ME.2016-1BS.ME.2016-2

Curriculum – BS in Mechanical Engineering

Graduation Requirements

To obtain the B.S.M.E. degree, the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

Mechanical Engineering Students

Credit-hours in Mathematics
14 Credit-hours in Basic Science
21 Credit-hours in Socio-humanistic Studies and Languages
19 Credit-hours in Engineering Science
66 Credit-hours in Mechanical Engineering
9 Credit-hours in Mechanical Engineering Electives
3 Credit-hours in Entrepreneurship

147 Total Credit-hours

 

To obtain the B.S.M.E. with a concentration in Aerospace Engineering, the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

15 Credit-hours in Mathematics
14 Credit-hours in Basic Science
21 Credit-hours in Socio-humanistic Studies and Languages
19 Credit-hours in Engineering Science
62 Credit-hours in Mechanical Engineering
19 Credit-hours in Aerospace Engineering Concentration

150 Total Credit-hours

Course Description

ENGL 0100 Preparatory English

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

The course is designed to develop basic written and oral skills. It promotes oral communication and personal expression, giving special emphasis to the development of vocabulary. By performing language functions, students acquire the basic skills of the English language.

ENGL 0110 English Grammar

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0100 or Placement by Admission Office.

Fundamental course in language designed to provide students with grammar skills in English for listening and writing with emphasis in increasing student’s capability of developing logical thinking both in speaking and writing. 

MATH 0102 Preparatory Mathematics

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: Placement Test by Admission Office

Study of basic operations on natural, whole integers, rationals, irrational numbers. Includes also fundamental properties of arithmetic, percent, ratio and elements of algebra; polynomial-basic operations; algebraic fractions; exponents and radicals and applications. A grade of “C” or better must be earned for placement in the next course.

MATH 0110 Algebra

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: MATH 0102 or Equivalent: Placement Test by Admission Office

This course includes the study of linear and nonlinear inequalities in one variable, inequalities and equations with absolute value; linear and quadratic equations, functions with applications, and relations and functions with its graphs. Includes also the study of algebra of functions, special functions, operations with functions, and inverse functions. A grade of “C” or better must be earned for placement in the next course.

MATH 1330 Pre-calculus I

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: MATH 0110 or equivalent; Placement Test by Admission Office.

Relations and functions; curve sketching, rational function, polynomial function, synthetic division, remainder and factor theorems, zeros of polynomials, graphs, trigonometric function and graphs, sine and cosine laws, solutions of right and oblique triangle, identities and trigonometric equations, and inverse function.

MATH 1340 Pre-calculus II

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: MATH 1330 or equivalent; Placement Test by Admission Office.

This course includes the study of trigonometry and its applications, complex numbers operations and De Moivre’s Theorem, matrix and linear algebra, study of system of linear equations, determinants and Cramer Rule, vectors, analytic geometry and conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions and its applications.

ENC 1101 English Composition I

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: ENC 1003 or Placement by Admission Office

This is a required general education course in college-level writing. Emphasis is placed on unified, coherent, and organized essay writing. Sentence and paragraph structure and writing fundamentals will also be reviewed.

ENC 1102 English Composition II

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: ENC 1101

This is a required general education course in college level writing and builds on the foundation of English Composition I. Further development of the students’ skills in composition, essay, communication, and research are included. 

ETH 2020 Ethics In Engineering

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisite: None

Study of the philosophical and legal aspects of ethics and their application to the professional responsibility in the field of engineering.

SPC 1026 Fundamentals of Speech Communications

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: ENC 1101

This course reviews the oral communication skills necessary for success in the student’s personal, professional and educational settings. The student will develop appropriate communication behaviors. 

WOH 2012 World Civilization I

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

A survey course emphasizing world civilizations from the prehistoric period to the 18th century. Discussion traces events which have shaped our cultural history. 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

A chronological survey of the visual arts from pre-history to modern day. Students’ will discover the visual arts as an important social force throughout history. 

HUE 1999 Selected Topics in Humanities

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

In-depth, intensive study of selected topics in the area of Humanities. If different topics are studied, this course may be taken twice for credit.

HUM 1020 Humanities

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

A basic approach to the creative ideas, works, and accomplishments of various cultures from the areas of art, drama, music, and literature. 

LIT 2411 Literature and Culture Issues

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

In this course the student will delve into the basics of literature. The creation of imaginative literature will be reviewed as well as the aesthetic value. Consideration will be given to techniques and theories with the focus on practical criticism. Several genres and literary periods will be studied. 

MUL 1010 Music Appreciation

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

A chronological survey of music from pre-history to modern day. Students will discover music as an important social force throughout history. 

SPN 1120 Elementary Spanish I

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

A course designed for beginners to acquire proficiency in the basic skills of Spanish listening/understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary and pronunciations. 

MATH 1350 Calculus I

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: MATH 1340 or equivalent

This course will acquaint the student with the concepts of limits and their properties, the derivative and its applications; finding derivatives by means of rules; chain rule, higher order derivatives; maxima and minima; related rates of changes; curve sketching using derivatives, definite and indefinite integral; area under a curve, differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental functions; Inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions: differentiation and integration; area between curves, volumes of solids of revolutions; arc length, surfaces of revolution; moments, centers of mass and centroids.

MATH 1360 Calculus II

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: MATH 1350

This course will acquaint the student with the concepts of limits and their properties, the derivative and its applications; finding derivatives by means of rules; chain rule, higher order derivatives; maxima and minima; related rates of changes; curve sketching using derivatives, definite and indefinite integral; area under a curve, differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental functions; Inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions: differentiation and integration; area between curves, volumes of solids of revolutions; arc length, surfaces of revolution; moments, centers of mass and centroids.

MATH 1370 Calculus III

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: MATH 1360

This course will acquaint the student with the concepts of:  vectors-valued functions: differentiation and integration, velocity and acceleration, tangent and normal vectors, arc length and curvature. Includes the study of function of several variables: limit, continuity, partial derivatives and their applications, LaGrange multipliers; multiple integrals and their applications, change of variables: polar coordinates, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, conservative vector fields, Stokes’s, Green’s and Gauss’s Theorems.

MATH 2350 Differential Equations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisites: Math 1360

The course includes the study of ordinary differential equations of first and second order; higher order equations; the fundamental existence theorem; modeling and its applications, and Laplace transforms. It emphasizes concepts of fundamental solution sets, linear independence and superposition principle along with solution methods and their applications in the fields of mechanical vibrations, and electrical networks.

SCIE 1210 Introduction to General Chemistry

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: MATH 1340 or equivalent

This course emphasizes in: Principles of chemistry, principles of stoichiometry, solutions, thermo chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, and gases. 

SCIE 1211 Introduction to General Chemistry Lab

Zero credit hour. Pre-requisite: MATH 1340 or equivalent. Co-requisites: SCIE 1210

This course is designed to provide the beginning chemistry student exposure to the basic techniques of laboratory work and the practical experience necessary to better the general information presented in the text and lecture.

SCIE 1430 Physics I

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: MATH 1350 or equivalent

This course will emphasize the principles and applications of basic mechanics, simple harmonic motion, waves, sound, and fluids dynamics. Calculus is emphasized throughout the course.

SCIE 1431 Physics I Lab

One credit hour. Pre-requisite: Math 1350 or equivalent. Co-requisites: SCIE 1430

Three-hour laboratory period per week. The first of a sequence of two laboratory courses. The experiences of this laboratory are designed to complement the Physics I.

SCIE 1440 Physics II

Four credit-hours. Pre-requisite: SCIE 1430, SCIE 1431, MATH 1350

This course will emphasizes the principles and applications of general thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism. Calculus is emphasized throughout the course.

SCIE 1441 Physics II Lab

One credit hour. Pre-requisite: SCIE 1430, SCIE 1431

Three-hour laboratory period per week. The second of a sequence of two laboratory courses. The experiences of this laboratory are designed to complement the Physics II.

PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychology

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

This course is designed to be an overview of the field of psychology. It provides a basic understanding of human behavior. 

SSE 1999 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

In-depth, intensive study of selected topics in the area of Social Sciences. If different topics are studied, this course may be taken twice for credit. 

SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology

Three credit-hours. Pre-requisites: NONE

An overview of society with emphasis on the relationships between human culture and the individual. It looks at cultural norms, the organization of society, human behavior in groups, social institutions, and the implications of social change.

EE 2000 Circuit Analysis I

Three credit-hours Pre-requisite: SCIE 1441, MATH 1370, CECS 2202, ENGI 2310/ ME Students only: ME 2010 and ME 3010 Co-requisites: MATH 2350Course Elements in a circuit and electrical quantities. Techniques for the DC circuit analysis. Natural and forced response of RL, RC, and RLC circuits. Introduction to AC circuits analysis.

ENGI 2110 Engineering Mechanics, Statics

Three credit-hours Pre-requisites: MATH 1360 and SCIE 1430 Co-requisite: MATH 1370 Analysis of force systems. Vectors. Laws of equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Structural analysis of trusses, frames, and machines. Center of gravity and moments of inertia. Internal forces. Friction.

ENGI 2260 Engineering Economics

Three credit-hours Pre-requisite: MATH 1350 Introduction to economic evaluation of investments for engineering projects. Life cycle costing. Depreciation and income tax determination. Replacement analysis. Evaluation of public projects

ENGI 2270 Probability & Statistic for Engineers

Three credit-hours Pre-requisite: MATH 1350 This course introduces the student to the basic concepts on probability and statistics and its application to the solution of engineering problems. Principles of probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution, hypothesis testing, correlation and simpler linear regression concepts will be essential to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

ENGI 2410 – ENGINEERING MECHANICS, DYNAMICS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ENGI 2110

This course covers the study of kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies in the idealization of mechanical systems. The course emphasizes the application of Newton’s laws, work and energy, and impulse and momentum methods in the dynamic analysis of such systems.

ENGI 2420 – FLUID MECHANICS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ENGI 2410 or ENGI 2910

This course covers the study and application of the fundamental principles of fluid mechanics. The course focuses in the static, kinematic and dynamic analysis of fluids in engineering systems. Application of momentum, energy and continuity principles to the analysis of incompressible flow applications. The course concludes with the analysis of viscous flows in pipes and open channels applications.

ENGI 2421- FLUID MECHANICS LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisite: ENGI 2270 (or CEE 2110), ENGI 2420

Laboratory experiences to illustrate the fluid mechanics concepts learned in ENGI 2420. Analysis of results and statistical evaluation data from experiments in gravimetric flow, hydrostatic thrust, stability of floating bodies, flow through orifices, discharge over weirs, impact of a jet and friction on pipes and accessories. The laboratory emphasizes team work and communication skills through the submission of oral and written reports.

ME 1210 – COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: None

This course presents an introduction to the principles of graphics communication in mechanical engineering. The course covers key engineering visualization techniques such as sketching, solid modeling, assemblies, dimensioning, tolerance definition and drafting using standard practices and state-of-the-art computer applications. The course emphasizes orthographic projections and multi-view drawings for engineering design and fabrication. At the end of the course, the students will work on a team-based design of a prototype device to be fabricated in ME 1211.

ME 1211 – CONVENTIONAL MANUFACTURING LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 1210.

This course presents an introduction to the practices and techniques in conventional processes for the manufacturing of engineering components. The course focuses on techniques for the use of band saws, milling machines, lathes and welding machines. The end of the course integrates the fabrication (under the guidance of the instructor) of the prototype device already designed in ME 1210.

ME 2010 – COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: MATH 1350

This course will introduce the students to the development of algorithms and computer programs using MATLAB. The course will cover basic program construction techniques such as top-down designs, flowcharting, pseudocoding, editing and debugging. Students will apply the learned techniques to the solution of engineering problems.

ME 2020 – APPLIED NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 2010

This course will introduce the students to the application of numerical methods and techniques to the solution of engineering and mathematical problems. The course addresses relevant topics in numerical analysis such as: root finding techniques, solution of linear algebraic equations, determination of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, curve fitting, as well as the application of numerical techniques for the differentiation, integration and solution of ordinary differential equations. The course emphasizes the use of MATLAB programming.

ME 2210 – ENGINEERING MATERIALS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: SCIE 1210, SCIE 1211
Co-Requisites ENGI 2110

This course introduces mechanical engineering students to the structures and properties of engineering materials such as metals, ceramics, glasses, polymers and composites. The course covers important topics such as atomic bonding, crystalline and non-crystalline structures, mechanical behavior, phase transformations and thermal processing techniques. The course emphasizes the selection and application of engineering materials to the design of engineering applications.

ME 2211- ENGINEERING MATERIALS LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisite: ENGI 2270, ME 2210

Laboratory experiences to support the concepts learned in ME 2210. Characterization and statistical analysis of mechanical properties of metals using tension, hardness, micro-hardness, metallography, phase transformation and heat treatment techniques. The laboratory emphasizes team work and communication skills through the submission of oral and written reports.

ME 2220 – MECHANISM DESIGN

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ENGI 2410, ME 1211, ME 2020

This course introduces students to the application of fundamental concepts of kinematics and kinetics to the analysis and design of mechanisms in mechanical systems. The course focuses to the design of linkages, cams and gears using analytical, graphical and computer-aided techniques.

ME 2230 – SOLID MECHANICS I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ENGI 2110, ME 2020, ME 2210

This course introduces mechanical engineering students to the concepts of stress, strain and deformation of structural components in mechanical systems. The course covers the analysis of structural members under axial, torsion and bending loading conditions.

ME 3110 – THERMODYNAMICS I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ENGI 2420

This course introduces mechanical engineering students to the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics. The course focuses on thermodynamic properties, energy and mass conservation, entropy and second law analysis as well as the study of ideal gas mixtures and psychrometrics.

ME 3011- ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisites: EE 2000

Laboratory practices to introduce students to experimental techniques in mechanical engineering applications. The laboratory has an emphasis in the statistical analysis of experimental results. The practices cover the selection and calibration of instrumentation, data acquisition techniques, and measurement error analysis. The laboratory emphasizes team work and communication skills through the submission of oral and written reports.

ME 3030 – SYSTEM DYNAMICS AND CONTROLS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ENGI 2420, EE 2000

This course covers the modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. An emphasis is placed in the mathematical modeling to determine the transient and steady-state response of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid systems. The course also covers the analysis and design of linear feedback control systems in the time and frequency domains.

ME 3040- MECHATRONICS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3030, ME 3011

This course introduces mechanical engineering students to the automation and digital control of industrial applications using electrical, electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic control devices and systems. Topics in this course include design of control circuits and analysis of the response of several mechanical systems to external conditions.

ME 3120 – THERMODYNAMICS II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3110, ME 2020

This course continues the study of the fundamental concepts and applications of thermodynamics. The course focuses on the application of thermodynamic principles to the analysis and design of vapor-powered, gas-powered, refrigeration and heat pump systems, refrigeration systems. The course concludes with key concepts in reacting mixtures and combustion principles.

ME 3140 – INTERMEDIATE FLUID MECHANICS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-requisites: ENGI 2420, ME 2020
Co-Requisites ENGI 2421

This course is a continuation of ENGI 2420 to address specific applications for mechanical engineers. The course presents a comprehensive view to the differential analysis of fluid flow, the study of flow over immersed bodies and the boundary layer theory and the analysis of compressible fluid flow. The course concludes with the treatment of fluid mechanics to turbomachinery applications.

ME 3150 – HEAT TRANSFER I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3110, ME 3140

This course presents an introduction of fundamental concepts of heat transfer. The course focuses on unidirectional and multidirectional steady-state conduction, transient conduction and radiation heat transfer.

ME 3160 – HEAT TRANSFER II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 3150, ENGI 2421

This course is a continuation of ME 3150 to cover basic concepts in heat convection transfer. This course provides an emphasis on external forced convection, internal forced convection, natural convection, and convection with change of phase. The course concludes with the analysis and design of heat exchangers and an introduction to the principles of mass transfer.

ME 3230 – SOLID MECHANICS II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 2230

This course continues the development of stress-strain analysis techniques for structural members in mechanical systems. The course emphasizes the application of stress and strain transformation techniques to structural members under combined loadings and thin-walled pressure vessels. The course also introduces students to theories of failure for static load conditions and the design of machinery components. The course concludes with the analysis of indeterminate beams, the buckling stability of columns and an introduction of energy methods.

ME 3240 – DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 3230

This course covers the design of mechanical components subjected to static and fatigue loads. The students are exposed to the design of machines using non-permanent joints (e.g., fasteners, screws, etc.), permanent joints (e.g., welding, brazing, bonding, etc.), mechanical springs, rolling and journal bearing design.

ME 3250 – DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 2220, ME 3240

This course continues the development of machine design techniques from ME 3240. Design of key mechanical components such as gears, shafts, couplings, brakes, clutches and flexible mechanical elements (e.g., belts, chains, etc.) subjected to static and fatigue loads.

ME 3260 – MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 3230

This course presents mechanical engineering students a survey of manufacturing processes including: casting, forming, machining, welding, brazing, adhesive bonding, mechanical fastening, as well as forming and shaping plastics and composite materials. The course also covers important topics in quality assurance, testing and inspection of manufactured products.

ME 4011- MECHATRONICS LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3040

Laboratory experiences in automation using electrical, electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic control systems. The laboratory practices include the selection and implementation of sensors and actuators (i.e., mechanical, pneumatics and hydraulics), along to electronic data acquisition systems and Programmable Logic Controllers. The laboratory emphasizes team work and communication skills through the submission of oral and written reports. situations.

ME 4110 – DESIGN OF THERMAL SYSTEMS

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3120, ME 3160, ENGI 2260

This course provides senior-level students an integrated approach to analyze, simulate, and design energy systems such as heat exchangers and pumps. The course also incorporates system economics and design optimization techniques in the design of such systems.

ME 4111- THERMAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 4110

Laboratory experiences to illustrate senior-level students the practical aspects of fluid and thermal systems such as heat exchangers, steam generators, cooling towers, refrigeration and air conditioning systems, wind tunnel, compressible fluid flow, and turbomachinery. The laboratory emphasizes team work and communication skills through the submission of oral and written reports.

ME 4251 – MODELING AND PRODUCT REALIZATION LABORATORY

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 3260, ME 2220

This course presents senior-level students an opportunity to integrate computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) applications in the design and development of engineering products. The course emphasizes the modeling and simulation of mechanical systems to predict the mechanical behavior and optimize the design as well as the use of modern manufacturing equipment such as rapid prototyping, numerical controlled programming, foam cutters ad 3D scanners in the fabrication of a prototype.

ME 4992 – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE DESIGN I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisites: ME 3250, ME 3040 or ME 4935, ME 5930, ME 4930 & Department Head Consent and ME 3160.
Co-Requisites: ME 4110, ENGI 2260

Comprehensive course to emphasize the key knowledge and concepts through the Mechanical Engineering program. Teams work in open-ended, multi-disciplinary design projects focused on solving industrially relevant problems. The course implements a systems engineering approach and emphasizes on the generation and selection of ideas as well as the application of analysis and design tools developed in previous courses. The course ME 4992 covers the development of the project from problem definition to its final design. The course stresses on team work, project management and communication skills through several technical presentations through the progress of the project.

ME 4994 – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CAPSTONE DESIGN II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
Pre-Requisite: ME 4992

This course is an extension of ME 4992. The course ME 4994 covers the development of the project from its final design to the construction and validation of a prototype. The course stresses on team work, project management and communication skills through several technical presentations through the progress of the project and the submission of a final comprehensive report.

MGMT 4660 Entrepreneurship

Three credit hours. Pre-requisite: NONE

This course teaches the process of establishing and managing a business enterprise. The student will learn to identify and develop the necessary skills to become an entrepreneur as well as laws, and social and economic factor related to business establishment. Also, the student will analyze the conflicts and problems faced by an entrepreneur in his/her way to success.