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Structural Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that focuses on the analysis and design of structures, such as buildings and bridges. Structural engineers are responsible for the making of safe and functional structures capable of resisting loads, like those produced by earthquakes and hurricanes.

Transportation Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that applies scientific principles to the planning, analysis, design, and operations of transportation systems such as highways, railways, marine ports, and airports to provide for the safe, rapid, confortable, convenient, economical, and environmentally compatible movement of people and goods.

Geotechnical Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that applies earth sciences to investigate the mechanical properties of soils, their behavior, and their ability to resist loads, such as those produced by superstructures.

Environmental Engineering

The discipline that applies science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment. It deals with water resources, water quality and treatment, waste water treatment and disposal, air pollution control, solid and hazardous waste management, occupational safety and health, environmental toxicology, environmental impact assessment, public health issues, and pollution prevention.

Construction Engineering

The area of study that applies managerial sciences to the engineering processes involved in the construction of superstructure and infrastructure projects, such as buildings, bridges, highways, airports, railroads, dams, and utilities. Construction engineers ensure that the construction is carried out in accordance with the design drawings and specifications and the contract documents.

Land Surveying and Mapping

Land Surveying and Mapping is the science of determining the position of points on the surface of the Earth through the application of mathematics and the use of specialized instruments. Surveying includes the measurement of angles and distances, the establishment of horizontal and vertical control points, plan confection, cadastral measurements, highway tracing and building locations, submarine topography and oceanic depths, plus the location of legal boundaries.

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying

Director’s Message

Welcome to the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying of the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico.
We invite you to look through our website and learn more about our academic programs, faculty, students, and laboratory facilities. The Department offers three undergraduate programs leading to a Bachelor’s degree. These are the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering and the Bachelor of Science in Land Surveying and Mapping. These three programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (www.abet.org). The Department also offers a program that leads to an Associate Degree in Land Surveying. Additionally, the Department has two graduate programs: one which leads to either a Master of Science or a Master of Engineering in Civil Engineering, and the other leads to a Master in Geospatial Science and Technology. The strengths of the Department are many. The programs’ curricula provide our students with the knowledge, technical skills, and experiences necessary to succeed in the ever-changing and competitive workforce. Our faculty members have strong educational and professional backgrounds that allow them to be excellent professors and researchers. Our support staff is highly committed to providing a first-rate environment. The Department’s laboratories are equipped to provide exceptional learning experiences, as well as to handle research projects of significance. We welcome prospective, current, and former students, employers of our graduates, and colleagues, and hope you find this site helpful. Please feel free to contact me with questions, comments, or suggestions by sending an e-mail to hcruzado@pupr.edu. We appreciate your interest and feedback.

Héctor J. Cruzado, PhD, PE
Professor and Department Head


ansac
Abet Eng
For more information, please visit the following address
www.abet.org

Prospective Students

Career Description

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Civil engineers are involved in almost all aspects of public works and utilities infrastructure development. They provide the engineering design of a multistory building, a highway, a bridge, a retaining wall to support soil pressure, a water supply system, a storm sewer, a sanitary sewer system, a dam, among other things. They may analyze the hydrologic conditions of a particular area, the mechanical properties of soils, the transportation needs of a community, or the expected behavior of a structure. They may also plan, overview, and manage the execution of the jobs previously mentioned.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Modern engineering is one of the great pillars of economic and social development. But development must not occur at the expense of environmental degradation. Therefore, the engineering design of urban, agricultural, and industrial facilities must have environmental protection mechanisms or systems built in. The environmental engineer is the professional who is academically prepared to design these environmental protection mechanisms and systems; and to collaborate with other professionals in the creation of environmentally sound engineering works. The graduates from this program will have their place in government agencies with regulatory, construction, or maintenance responsibilities; in design and consulting engineering firms; and in the industrial sector, especially in the type of industry that, because of its industrial operations, results in significant environmental impact.

LAND SURVEYING AND MAPPING

Land Surveying and Mapping is currently undergoing the biggest process of growth among engineering related fields. This career offers new great job opportunities, along with conventional surveying opportunities. The combination of theoretical knowledge supported by the multidisciplinary technologies covered in this bachelor degree opens a big spectrum of opportunities for diverse types of jobs. Governmental agencies and the private sector are constantly hiring professionals to work on surveying related projects. The real estate industry is a market in which our students are highly demanded.

Opportunities
Admissions
Financial Aid

Current Students

Honor Roll
Student Chapters
The following student organizations are active in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying:

Professor Ginger Rossy is the faculty coordinator for all student chapters of the Department. Students interested in joining of the chapters may contact Prof. Rossy at grossy@pupr.edu.

Senior Design Projects
Civil Engineering Senior Design Projects, Environmental Engineering Senior Design Projects, and Land Surveying and Mapping Senior Projects are probably the most important courses of the Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Land Surveying and Mapping academic programs, respectively. In these courses, the students apply the concepts learned through their years in their undergraduate curricula. They work in teams to complete the design of a project that correlates all the major areas of their corresponding degree program.

Agricultural Development

Land Surveying and Mapping

Parks and Natural Reserves

Schools

Social Responsibility

Solids and Hazardous Waste Management

Sports, Leisure and Tourism

Transportation

Urban Planning and Housing

Water Supply, Stormwater Management, and Wastewater Management

Mentoring

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

PACHECO CROSETTI, GUSTAVO Professor Office: L-154 Phone: X-452 Email address: gpacheco@pupr.edu

MENTOR

LORENZANA COLLAZO, ISABEL Assistant to the Department Head in Academic Affairs Office: L-157 Phone: X-408 Email address: ilorenza@pupr.edu

Advising
Opportunities
Professional Development Programs

Professional Development Program in Transportation Infrastructure Inspection

PUPR/ACI-Herzog

Principal Investigator: Gustavo E. Pacheco Crosetti, PhD, PE
Co-Principal Investigator: Amado Vélez Gallego, MS
Consulting Faculty: José Borrageros Lezama, MS, PE

Students 2019/2020:

  • Gustavo J. Albelo Rivera
  • Fernando Casanova Tosado
  • Robert N. Cornelio Tatis
  • Kevin Gómez Hernández
  • Abdiel J. Rodríguez López
  • Anmaris G. Rodríguez Ortiz

Students 2018/2019: 

  • Gustavo J. Albelo Rivera
  • Mónica M. Aponte Alequín
  • Robert N. Cornelio Tatis
  • Kevin Gómez Hernández
  • William A. López Colón
  • Enrique G. Méndez Cuevas (graduate)
  • Abdiel J. Rodríguez López

Students 2017/2018:

  • Mónica M. Aponte Alequín
  • Elisandro Carmona Cartagena
  • Lucía M. González Meléndez
  • Raymond A. Gutiérrez Rivera (graduate)
  • Enrique G. Méndez Cuevas (graduate)
  • Carlos A. Rodríguez Latoni

  Students 2016/2017:

  • Paola V. Armada Rodríguez
  • Alejandro De La Mata Limardo
  • Pedro A. González García
  • Raymond A. Gutiérrez Rivera
  • Jonathan A. Maestre Morales (graduate)
  • Enrique G. Méndez Cuevas

Students 2015/2016:

  • Paola V. Armada Rodríguez
  • Alejandro De La Mata Limardo
  • Lolivone L. De La Rosa León
  • Luis A. De Soto Torres (graduate)
  • Jonathan A. Maestre Morales
  • Laura G. Roldán Hernández

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015 2               Students 2014/2015:

  • Lolivone L. De La Rosa León
  • Edwin R. Freire Burgos
  • Edna N. Gómez Rosario (graduate)
  • Jonathan A. Maestre Morales
  • Armando Maldonado Rosario
  • Fernando J. M. Martínez Román

  Students 2013/2014:

  • Khaled Aboomar Crespo
  • Edwin R. Freire Burgos
  • Edna N. Gómez Rosario (graduate)
  • María J. Martinez Jerez (graduate)
  • Diana C. Prado Garzón
  • Aneysha M. Serrano Santos

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015 3             Students 2012/2013:

  • Juan A. Echagaray Romero
  • Edwin R. Freire Burgos
  • Edna N. Gómez Rosario
  • Silvio R. Martinez Jerez
  • Carlos M. Mateo Ortiz (graduate)
  • Jorge I. Reyes Ortiz (graduate)

  Students 2011/2012:

  • Reisaac Colón Martínez
  • Jorge L. González Amaya (graduate)
  • Jonathan Herrera Roldán
  • Carlos M. Mateo Ortiz (graduate)
  • Andrea A. Merejo Alejo (graduate)
  • Carlos E. Ortiz Vázquez

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015 4             Students 2010/2011:

  • Jorge González (graduate)
  • Hector Martinez
  • Carlos Otero
  • Erik Rivera
  • Yamayra Rodriguez (graduate)
  • Edwin Toledo

  Students 2009/2010:

  • Carlos Alvarez (graduate)
  • Hector Martinez
  • Carlos Otero
  • Erik Rivera
  • Josué Rivera (graduate)
  • Yamayra Rodriguez

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015 5               Students 2008/2009:

  • Glorielisa Gonzalez
  • Carlos Mateo
  • Josué Rivera (graduate)
  • Carlos Rodriguez
  • Gilberto Vigo
  • Félix Zurcher (graduate)

  Students 2007/2008:

  • Carlos Cambrelén
  • Melvin Díaz
  • Carlos Mateo
  • Gisselle Márquez
  • Frances Tatis
  • Gilberto Vigo
  • Félix Zurcher (graduate)

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015

  • Students 2007/2008:
  • Carlos Cambrelén
  • Melvin Díaz
  • Carlos Mateo
  • Gisselle Márquez
  • Frances Tatis
  • Gilberto Vigo
  • Félix Zurcher (graduate)

The Professional Development Program In Transportation Infrastructure Inspection is a cooperative agreement between Alternate Concepts Inc. (ACI) and the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (PUPR). The Program has three principal objectives:

  • Stimulate the development of engineering students in the area of Transportation Infrastructure Inspection and Maintenance.
  • Develop an applied research process in the area of visual inspection, and propose possible improvements to the inspection, condition evaluation, and maintenance assessment processes of transportation facilities.
  • Perform an inspection and maintenance assessment program of the San Juan Railway System – Tren Urbano (TU) structures and drainage infrastructure.

Program Stages

  • Formative Stage
  • Research and Development Stage
  • Inspection Stage
  • Evaluation Stage
  • Reporting Stage

PUPR-ACI Summary 2014-2015
                    The program has five stages:

  • Formative Stage:
    • Students are trained through seminars and workshops in several topics:
      • Fundamentals of Inspection and Monitoring
      • Structural Failures, Damages, and 
Deterioration
      • Damage and Condition and Rating
      • Types of and Damages in:
        • RC Structures
        • Steel Structures
        • Retaining Walls
        • Earth Slopes
        • Drainage Infrastructure
        • Tunnel Facilities
      • Visual Inspection Procedures and Equipment
      • Safety
      • TU Infrastructure
      • Condition Assessment and Rating
      • Documentation and Reporting of Findings

 

  • Research and Development Stage:
    • Students have to perform extensive literature review on visual inspection procedures and condition assessment rating around the world, and propose improvements in all the stages of the process:
      • Inspection procedures and equipment
      • Inspection forms
      • Infrastructure identification and location
      • Findings documentations
      • Assessment of the field conditions found through objective and quantitative rating scales
      • Required level of intervention according to obtained rating (i.e. routine maintenance, repair, replacement, among others), to support the establishment of priorities in the maintenance process.

 

  • Inspection Stage
    • The concepts learned in the previous stage are applied to different components of the TU infrastructure.

 

  • Evaluation Stage
    • The findings of the inspection are evaluated, and a condition rating is assigned (that helps decide the type of maintenance process required to assure adequate safety and operational conditions).

 

  • Reporting Stage
    • A detailed report of the findings and the assigned condition is developed. An evaluation of possible causes to the discovered findings, and recommended intervention are also provided.

Internships / Coops
 

Alumni

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

Civil engineers are responsible for providing the world’s infrastructure facilities, which are basic to the existence of modern society. These facilities can be large and complex, thus requiring the civil engineers to be broadly trained and able to deal with the latest technologies.
Learn More Watch Introductory Video

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

The Environmental Engineering Program leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Engineering. The program offers knowledge in environmental engineering subjects that will allow the students to understand and subsequently acquire additional knowledge in their specialized areas of interest, according to personal inclination and available opportunities. Throughout the curriculum the student develops the ability to apply pertinent knowledge to the practice of engineering design in the major discipline areas of environmental engineering.
Learn More Watch Introductory Video

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LAND SURVEYING AND MAPPING

Land surveying is the science of determining the position of points on the surface of the Earth through the application of mathematics and the use of specialized instruments.
Learn More

CIVIL ENGINEERING / LAND SURVEYING COMBINED PROGRAM

In this program, students can obtain both a Bachelor in Civil Engineering and a Bachelor in Land Surveying and Mapping. The students must first get admission and complete the Civil Engineering (CE) program. While the student completes the CE program, he or she can take Land Surveying (LS) courses as elective courses. After completing the CE program, the student must request admission to the LS program. Depending on the elective courses taken, the student can complete the LS program on anywhere from 38 to 45 credits.

MASTER IN GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Geospatial Science and Technology refers to the science and technology used for visualization, measurement and analysis of features or phenomena that occur on the earth.
Learn More

MASTER IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

The CE graduate program seeks to promote advanced studies and research at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. Moreover, it seeks to involve graduate students in this process and to instill in them an intense desire for knowledge. Students must select one of the four available Major Areas: (1) Geotechnical Engineering, (2) Water Resources and Water Treatment, (3) Structural Engineering, and (4) Construction Engineering.
Learn More

ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN LAND SURVEYING

The Associate Degree in Land Surveying is a two-year academic program. It has been designed to provide the student a body of knowledge directed to understand, measure, and analyze the boundaries of land, airspace and water resources of a property.
Learn More

Department Labs

Construction Materials Laboratory

1. Introduction

The development of any engineering project requires the civil engineer to understand the materials and the structural elements from which the project will be constructed. The physical and mechanical properties as well as the loads that each construction material and structural element can withstand are part of the information required for the design of a construction project. Technological advances, challenges in construction, and novel discoveries have been historically some of the motivators for the constant creation of new materials and systems used for the construction of structures. As new materials and structural systems are developed, the necessity to test these and gather data on their behavior increases. With its key personnel and technological resources, the Construction Materials Laboratory at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico is in a valuable position for helping in the advancement of new construction technologies. This laboratory is mostly used to support Civil Engineering undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as some extracurricular activities of the students, such as competitions sponsored by the student chapters of professional societies like the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Most importantly, the laboratories are used to support research projects targeted toward the better understanding of old and new construction materials and structural systems. In the Construction Materials course (CE 2510) the students learn the fundamental properties of the most common construction materials used in Puerto Rico and the United States. Concurrently, in the Construction Materials Laboratory course (CE 2511), the students can test the knowledge acquired in the theoretical course by experimenting with various construction materials.

2. Objectives

The Construction Materials Laboratory seeks to offer its services to the construction industry to help develop a better understanding of the structural behavior of construction materials and structural systems, be them old or new. This laboratory also seeks sponsors who want to help students to develop research projects or to participate in national competitions sponsored by professional societies.

3. Enrollment

The maximum enrollment of the CE 2511 course is 16 students. In each academic term (Fall, Winter, and Spring), one section of the course is offered.

4. Staff

Table1 summarizes the personnel that teach or assist in the Construction Materials Laboratory.

Resource Employment status
Balhan Alsaadi, PhD Professor, CE 2511
Salvador Montilla, BSEE, MECE Laboratory Assistant

5. Facilities

The laboratory facilities are located in room L-102 with an area of 25 by 35 feet that houses four working counters with lower storage compartments, one closet compartment, several of the most sensitive testing equipment and one office. Another 12 feet by 45 feet room is used to store larger pieces of equipment, such as the concrete mixer and several other items used in the preparation of concrete mixes.

6. Tests Conducted and Equipment

6.1 Concrete aggregates
Concrete is an artificial rock created by mixing cement, water, aggregates, and additives in the right proportions. The aggregates constitute between 60 and 80 percent of the total concrete mix. This is why the aggregates chosen must be of good quality. Several concrete aggregates tests are performed to obtain the necessary data about the sands and gravel available in the laboratory and from which the students create a concrete mix.

6.1.1 Fine and Coarse Aggregate Sieve Analysis
This test is performed to verify if the chosen materials have an adequate particle size distribution to be used in normal weight concrete. The laboratory has a Fine Aggregate Sieves Shaker (Figures 1 and 2) and a Coarse Aggregate Sieves Shaker (Figure 3) to perform these analyses.

6.1.2 Coarse Aggregate Abrasion Test
Concrete mixes used for pavement construction will be subjected to abrasion, which could have a negative impact on the aggregates. The Los Angeles Machine (Figure 5) is used to test the abrasive resistance of coarse aggregates.

6.1.3 Percent Absorption and Specific Gravity of Coarse and Fine Aggregates
It is necessary to obtain the percent absorption, percent humidity, and specific gravity of the aggregates used in concrete to balance the moisture in a concrete mix. The data necessary for these measurements are obtained using the high precision scales (Figure 10) and ovens (Figure 8) that are available at the laboratory.

6.1.4 Unit weight of Coarse Aggregates
Containers calibrated to various yields are available at the laboratory to determine the unit weight of various types of concrete aggregates (Figure 7).

6.1.5 Organic Impurities in Fine Aggregates
Bottles, beakers, flasks, and other pieces of glass are available to make precise measurements of the chemicals used to detect organic impurities in fine aggregates which could be detrimental to concrete structures (Figures 6 and 9).

6.2 Concrete Design, Mixing, and Testing
As part of the CE 2511 course the students are required to develop a concrete mix having a specific compressive resistance using the aggregates available at the laboratory. They must prepare the mix either using the concrete mixer or by hand, cast concrete cylinders as per specifications, cure them for periods of one week to 28 days and perform resistance tests on them. The resistance tests include compressive and split tests performed on one of the two available Forney Concrete Compression Machines (Figure 4). Also, Modulus of Elasticity tests are performed using the available electronic or mechanical Compresometers (Figure 11).

6.3 Wood
The Forney Concrete Compression Machines are also used to perform compressive tests on samples of wood. Also, the specific gravity and humidity are calculated using the high precision balances and ovens.

6.4 Reinforcing Steel
An Instron Hydraulic Universal Testing Machine (Figure 12) is available to test the tensile resistance of various diameters of concrete reinforcing steel rods.

6.5 Asphalt
Several procedures and equipment are used at the Construction Materials Laboratory to test the compressive behavior of asphalt pavements.

7. Other Uses of the Laboratory

The Construction Materials Laboratory is also used by graduate students to perform material testing and by members of the student chapters of professional societies to develop concrete samples to participate in competitions sponsored by the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Award winning pieces developed at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico are on display at the entrance of the laboratory. It also holds one laboratory meeting of the CE 1011 – Introduction to Civil Engineering course.

8. Equipment

This section presents photos of the equipment available in the laboratory.

Figure 1 Fine Aggregate Sieves Shaker

Figure 2 Standard Fine Aggregate Sieves

Figure 3 Coarse Aggregate Sieves Shaker

Figure 4 Concrete Compression Machine

Figure 5 Los Angeles Machine (Coarse Aggregate Abrasion Test)

Figure 6 Glass Volumetric Flask

Figure 7 Yield Buckets: 1/10 cf, 1/3 cf, 1/2 cf

Figure 8 Stabile-Thermal Gravity Oven

Figure 9 Organic Impurities Test for Sands

Figure 10 High Precision Scales

Figure 11 Electronic Strain Measurements for Concrete

Figure 12 Instron Tensile Equipment and Other Special Testing Equipment

9. Research Projects

The following is a list of some research projects that have been conducted by the students at the Laboratory:

  • Air-compressing concrete columns
  • Different curing methods for permeable concrete
  • Effects of drastic climate changes in concrete strength
  • FRP applied to concrete members
  • CMU units using Fly Ash from AES
  • Compressive capacity of concrete using destructive and non-destructive testing

A photograph of civil engineering students working during a laboratory session is presented in Figure 13.

ConsL13

Figure 13 Students performing laboratory work

Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory

1. Introduction

Soils are engineering materials usually formed under random and extremely variable circumstances, which make them rather difficult to characterize for design purposes. Consequently, it has been necessary to standardize laboratory tests to measure the engineering properties of soils with an acceptable rate of accuracy. The concepts discussed in the theoretical geotechnical engineering courses are reinforced through the direct measurement of soil properties, thus having a direct effect on the student as follows: 1. Improve understanding of the differences between soil types through result comparison and analysis. 2. More accurate assessment of the limitations involved when considering the soil-structure interaction in design. 3. Improve knowledge of the local soil conditions and the effect of moisture changes and other factors on soil strength. The Geotechnical Engineering component of the Civil Engineering undergraduate program at PUPR consists of two theoretical and two laboratory courses that are to be carried out in two consecutive terms as follows:

First Term Geotechnical Engineering I (CE 3210) Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory (CE 3211)
Second Term Geotechnical Engineering II (CE 3220) Geomechanics Laboratory (CE 3221)

The laboratory courses meet for two hours twice a week. Safety and test procedure briefs are followed by a PowerPoint presentation of the test, the students are provided with handouts to follow the test presentations. The Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory has multiple (usually, four to five) sets of equipment meeting or exceeding industry standards. The laboratory facilities provide enough space for four fully equipped workstations. The laboratory supports the theoretical courses, some elective courses, and research at PUPR.

2.Enrollment

The maximum enrollment per course section is 16 students. In each academic term (Fall, Winter, and Spring) one section of the CE 3211 course and one section of the CE 3221 course are offered.

3. Staff

Currently, two instructors teach the Geotechnical Laboratory courses with the assistance of one technician. The qualifications and relevant background data of the staff are shown in Table 1.

Table 1 Laboratory Staff

Resource Employment status
Omaira Collazos, PhD Professor, CE 3221
José A. Martínez, MSCE Professor, CE 3121
Isabel Lorenzana, MEM, BSCE Laboratory Assistant

4. Facilities

The laboratory facilities are located in a 25 by 35 feet area in Room L-106 room that houses three working counters with lower storage compartments and a storage room. Another 12 feet by 45 feet room is dedicated to compaction testing and graduate student work. Figures 1 and 2 show the laboratory facilities. Some of the tests and research activities are carried out around the PUPR campus.

01

Figure 1 Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory facilities

02

Figure 2 Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory facilities

5. Tests Conducted and Equipment

5.1 Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory (CE 3211)

Following is a description of the tests performed for this course:

5.1.1 Sub-soil Exploration and Sampling
The drilling crew performs two boring by means of the Standard Penetration Test (SPT) at the beginning of the term; the retrieved samples are used for testing throughout the term.

5.1.2 Water Content and Soil Phase Relationships
The students evaluate the relationships between the three phases that make up a partially saturated soil sample by means of direct measurement of volume, total weight, water content, and specific gravity calculations. The results of the tests are then used to solve a geotechnical engineering problem involving earthwork calculations.

5.1.3 Consistency Limits
The students determine the plastic limit, the liquid limit, and the plasticity index of clayey soil samples; the plasticity index value is used to have an idea of the swelling potential of the soil.

5.1.4 Mechanical Grain Size Distribution
The students perform the mechanical grain size distribution of a sandy sample and use the results to determine whether the sample is suitable for use as fine aggregate for a concrete mix (ASTM C-33).

5.1.5 Hydrometer Test
A hydrometer test is performed on a fine clayey soil sample in conjunction with a washed grain size distribution in order to determine the clay fraction of the sample. Consistency test results are provided to the students so they can combine with the test results to estimate the swelling potential of the soil sample.

5.1.6 Washed Grain Size Distribution
The students perform a washed grain size distribution of the same sample used for the consistency limits test.

5.1.7 Soil Classification
The results of the consistency and washed grain size distribution tests are combined to classify the fine soil sample as per the Unified and AASHTO systems.

5.1.8 Compaction Test
The maximum dry density and the optimum moisture content of a soil sample are determined by means of a Modified Proctor Test. The trend of the relationship between the water content and the dry density values is established by mixing the soil with a minimum of five different amounts of water.

5.1.9 Field Density
The field density of a sample retrieved from the PUPR campus is determined using the sand cone method; that value is used to determine the degree of compaction of the sample.

5.1.10 Falling Head Permeability Test
The hydraulic conductivity of a sandy sample is determined by means of a falling head test; the result is used to estimate the amount of seepage underneath a concrete dam. The effect of sample handling on void ratio and on the hydraulic conductivity value is discussed. An additional permeability test is conducted on a finer sample to demonstrate the significant (order of magnitude) reduction in hydraulic conductivity for fine soils. Figures 3 through 11 show the available equipment and the tests performed as part of this course.

5. Tests Conducted and Equipment

5.1 Geotechnical Engineering I laboratory (CE 3210)

Following is a description of the tests performed for this course:

5.1.1 Sub-soil Exploration and Sampling.
A drilling crew performs two boring by means of the Standard Penetration Test (SPT) at the beginning of the term; the retrieved samples are used for testing throughout the term.

5.1.2 Water Content and Soil Phase Relationships.
The students evaluate the relationships between the three phases that make up a partially saturated soil sample by means of direct measurement of volume, total weight, water content, and specific gravity calculations. The results of the tests are then used to solve a geotechnical engineering problem involving earthwork calculations.

5.1.3 Consistency Limits.
The students determine the plastic limit, the liquid limit, and the plasticity index of clayey soil samples; the plasticity index value is used to have an idea of the swelling potential of the soil.

5.1.4 Mechanical Grain Size Distribution.
The students perform the mechanical grain size distribution of a sandy sample and use the results to determine whether the sample is suitable for use as fine aggregate for a concrete mix (ASTM C-33).

5.1.5 Washed Grain Size Distribution.
The students perform a washed grain size distribution of the same sample used for the consistency limits test.

5.1.6 Soil Classification.
The results of the consistency and washed grain size distribution tests are combined to classify the fine soil sample as per the Unified and AASHTO systems.

5.1.7 Compaction Test.
The maximum dry density and the optimum moisture content of a soil sample are determined by means of a Modified Proctor Test. The trend of the relationship between the water content and the dry density values is established by mixing the soil with a minimum of five different amounts of water.

5.1.8 Field Density.
The field density of a sample retrieved from the PUPR campus is determined using the sand cone method; that value is used to determine the degree of compaction of the sample.

5.1.9 Falling Head Permeability Test. 
The hydraulic conductivity of a sandy sample is determined by means of a falling head test; the result is used to estimate the amount of seepage underneath a concrete dam. The effect of sample handling on void ratio and on the hydraulic conductivity value is discussed. An additional permeability test is conducted on a finer sample to demonstrate the significant (order of magnitude) reduction in hydraulic conductivity for fine soils. Figures 3 through 10 show the available equipment and the tests performed as part of this course.

03

Figure 3 Soil sample retrieved by Standard Penetration Tests at PUPR campus

04

Figure 4 Water content determinations

05

Figure 5 Consistency limits

06

Figure 6 Mechanical grain size distributions

07

Figure 7 Hydrometer test

08

Figure 8 Washed grain size distributions

09

Figure 9 Modified Proctor test

10

Figure 10 Field dry density

11

Figure 11 Falling head permeameter

5.2 Geomechanics Laboratory (CE 3221)

The following tests are performed as part of this course:

5.2.1 Sub-soil Exploration and Sample – Soil Profile
Soil samples are obtained at the PUPR campus by means of the Standard Penetration Test, (SPT) from two borings to a depth of between 16 and 20 feet, the cohesive nature of the soils allows for high sample recovery yielding good, non-fractured specimens. Each of the teams of this course is in charge of performing the following tests on one of the specimens: moist and dry unit weight, water content, consistency limits, and washed grain size distribution. The data is shared with the rest of the teams of the other sections after being reviewed by the instructors. The students prepare a 17 in by 11 in soil profile depicting the variation of the geotechnical properties of the soil with the results from all the teams.

5.2.2 Consolidation test
A saturated fine soil sample, retrieved using a thin wall (Shelby) tube, is subjected to increasing vertical overburden for five days; the teams collect and share the sample deformation data. An application problem is solved using the test results to estimate the amount and rate of consolidation settlement induced by an axial load on a rectangular footing.

5.2.3 Unconfined Compression Test
A cohesive soil sample obtained at the PUPR campus by means of the Standard Penetration Test (SPT) is subjected to unconfined compression in order to determine its consistency, its modulus of elasticity, and the value of Poisson’s ratio at the peak value. The test results are used to estimate the immediate/elastic settlement underneath a rigid concrete footing due to axial loading.

5.2.4 Direct Shear Test
A direct shear test is performed on a dry, cohesionless sandy soil sample in order to determine the value of its angle of internal friction, . The unit weight of the soil sample is determined using a cylindrical mold; the results are used to evaluate the overturning moment due to soil pressure on a gravity wall.

5.2.5 Triaxial Compression Test
A triaxial compression test under unconsolidated/undrained (UU) conditions is performed on cohesive soil samples in order to determine its cohesion and internal angle of friction values. The results are used to determine the factor of safety against sliding for a slope.

5.2.6 CBR Test
The California Bearing Ratio (CBR) test is a penetration test in an unsoaked sample condition using the same sample of compaction test to provide the student with the optimum moisture content and proctor dry density already tested. This is to evaluate the ratio of force per unit area for design the subgrade strength of roads and pavements. The results are used to determine the thickness of pavement and its component layers. Figures 12 through 22 depict the available equipment and the tests performed as part of this course.

12

Figure 12 Unconfined compression test on sample retrieved by STP

13

Figure 13 Determination of sample dimensions

14

Figure 14 Soil grinder for subsoil evaluation

15

Figure 15 Reading of consolidation sample deformation

16

Figure 16 Sample at the end of the consolidation test

17

Figure 17 Unconfined compression test apparatus

18

Figure 18 Direct shear test apparatus

19

Figure 19 Preparation of soil sample for direct shear test

20

Figure 20 Triaxial compression test apparatus

21

Figure 21 Triaxial compression test equipment with automatic data acquisition system

22

Figure 22 CBR test equipment with automatic data acquisition system

6. Equipment Maintenance and Calibration

All the major equipment of the laboratory is periodically maintained by the staff and calibrated by external resources. The major equipment includes two triaxial test apparatus, two direct shear apparatus, two unconfined compression machine, three ovens, and two consolidation test stations.

Dr. Bernardo Deschapelles Structural Engineering Laboratory

1. Introduction

The developing of any structural analysis and design process requires a clear understanding of the structural behavior, and the hypothesis and limitations of the analytical models adopted for such tasks. The Structural Engineering Laboratory provides students the opportunity to perform laboratory tests over structural models and elements that help them visualize the structural behavior and validate the theoretical response presented in the corresponding courses. The Structural Engineering Laboratory is prepared to support and complement undergraduate and graduate courses of Civil Engineering, such as Statics, Mechanics of Materials, Structural Analysis, Structural Steel Design, Structural Concrete Design, Masonry Design, Introduction to Civil Engineering, among others. The Structural Engineering Laboratory also allows students to perform undergraduate and graduate research projects related to structural and member behavior, and to structural damages evaluation, and gives support to some extracurricular activities, such as the competitions organized by the student chapters of professional societies (i.e. the American Concrete Institute and the American Society of Civil Engineers).

2. Staff

The Structural Engineering Laboratory course (CE 3121) of the Civil Engineering Program is taught by one full-time faculty member with the assistance of one technician, (see Table 1). Table 1 Laboratory Staff

Resource Employment status
Balhan Alsaadi, PhD PhD Professor, CE 3121
Salvador Montilla, MECE Laboratory Assistant

Other Structural Engineering Faculty members use the laboratory either to develop special laboratory experiences to complement/enhance their theoretical courses, or to support the research activities of their supervised students. The qualifications and relevant background data of the staff are shown in the following table:

3. Facilities

The laboratory facilities are located in room L-104 within an area of 35 by 50 feet, adjacent to the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, and connected to the Construction Materials Laboratory. The room houses the laboratory equipment (described in section 4) and has one large closet compartment to store supplementary equipment, and two small closet compartments to store several of the most sensitive testing equipment.

4. Equipment and Brief Description of Tests

This section presents images of the equipment available at the Structural Engineering Laboratory, and a brief description of some of their uses. Figure 1 shows a test frame (manufacturer: Hi-Tech; model: Magnus) with two hydraulic jacks with capacity of 50 KN (11.5 kips) each. This frame may be used to show the behavior of simple structures such as trusses (as shown in Figure 2), beams, small frames, etc. This equipment is frequently used in several undergraduate courses, such as the Construction Materials Laboratory, the Mechanics of Materials courses, the Structural Analysis courses, the Capstone Design courses. Undergraduate and graduate students also use this device to perform their research projects, performing strength analysis and behavior of small non-scaled elements, as depicted in Figures 3 to 8. This test frame is complemented with a data acquisition system (DAS), with the corresponding electronic sensors for load, strain, deflection and temperature. Other mechanical sensors are also available, such as dial gauges of 1”, 2”, and 3” of displacement, and two load rings with capacity of 10 Kips.

DBD01

Figure 1 Test Frame and Hydraulic Jacks

 

DBD02

Figure 2 Truss Instrumented with Dial Gauges and Strain Gauges and DAS

DBD03

 

Figure 3 Testing of a Reinforced Concrete Beam

DBD04

Figure 4 Testing of a Reinforced Concrete T-Beam

DBD05

Figure 5 Testing of a Reinforced Masonry Beam

DBD06

Figure 6 Testing of a Steel Beam Instrumented with Dial Gages, Strain Gages and a DAS

DBD07

Figure 7 Testing of a Wood Specimen

DBD08

Figure 8 Testing of a Fiber-Reinforced Wood Specimen

The laboratory has also four (4) small testing frames that allow performing load tests over small-scaled structures; these experiences may be used to support the theory of structural lectures with experiments. In these structures the student can corroborate the theory, and visualize the structural behavior emphasized in the corresponding course. Figure 9 shows the analysis of a continuous steel beam, and Figure 10 the analysis of a portal steel frame. In both examples the deflected shape with the inflection points can be appreciated. The corresponding vertical displacements and joint rotations in the beam, or the horizontal drift in the frame, are measured and compared to the results from the theoretical analysis.

DBD09

Figure 9 Testing Frame with Continuous Beam

Fig10

Figure 10 Testing Frame with Portal Frame

The laboratory has also a device for the analysis of a two-way slab. Senior and graduate students use this equipment to analyze the behavior of a two-way under punctual loads, measuring its deflection and changing the support (boundary) conditions and the load pattern. The experimental results are compared with the results of a computerized analysis by means of the Finite Element Method (i.e. using SAP2000 or Visual Analysis programs). Figure 11 shows this equipment and its instrumentation.

Fig11

Figure 11 Two-way Slab Testing Device

The Laboratory is also equipped with small scale models, fully instrumented, of typical structures such as trusses (Figure 12) and arches (Figure 13). These models are mounted within a test frame (shared with the Mechanics of Materials Laboratory) that has a DAS to receive the input from the electronic transducers and is connected to a PC that receives the data from the DAS.

Fig12

Figure 12 Fully Instrumented Small-Scale Truss

Fig13

Figure 13 Fully Instrumented Small-Scale Arch (Source: TQ Education and Training)

The laboratory has equipment to perform special studies on structures, structural elements, and member materials, such as the concrete moisture meter (used to measure moisture content in concrete floors and screeds without drilling) shown in Figure 14, and the ultrasonic tester (used to determine the uniformity and quality of concrete and presence of defects, cracks and voids, modulus of elasticity and concrete strength) shown in Figure 15, and Elcometer 331 Concrete Covermeter is a handheld Covermeter for fast and accurate location, orientation and measurement of concrete reinforcement bars (high tensile steel or stainless steel) shown in Figure 16, and The Resonance Tester [RT-1] system is typically used to measure the dynamic Young’s modulus (E), shear modulus (G) and Poisson’s ratio (ν) of asphalt, concrete, rock, masonry, carbon and other cylinder, beam, and core-shaped specimens shown in Figure 17 Figure 18 shows examples of the support mechanical and carpenter equipment that is available in the lab.

Fig21

Figure 14 Concrete Moisture Meter

Fig22

Figure 15 Ultrasonic Tester

DBD16

Figure 16 Elcometer 331 Half-Call Probe Tester

DBD17

Figure 17 Resonant Frequency Test

Fig23

Figure 18 Carpenter and Mechanical Tools

The following figures show the use of the laboratory for extracurricular projects (such as the design of a concrete canoe, Figure 19), and special class projects, such as the student proposal and development of devices that shows a particular structural behavior (portal frame, Figure 20) or concept (modal shapes and periods of vibration of multiple degree of freedom systems, Figure 21).

DBD19

Figure 19 Use of Laboratory for an Extracurricular Activity – Concrete Canoe

Fig25

Figure 20 Student Developed Device to Show Portal Frame Behavior

DBD09

Figure 21 Student Developed Device to Show Vibration Modes and Natural Periods of a Two DOF System

5. Structural Engineering Laboratory course

The following list summarizes the tests that are conducted during the CE 3121 laboratory course.

  • Measurement of modulus of elasticity (tension test).
  • Torsion in rods of different cross-sectional shapes.
  • Internal shear force and shear diagram on simple beams.
  • Internal bending moment and bending moment diagram on simple beams.
  • Shear center on thin walled open cross section members.
  • Electronic measurement of strain under bending and torsional loads.
  • Column buckling with different support conditions.
  • Simple beam deflections.
  • Simple trusses and simple frames deflections.
  • Special class projects.

The following images present the equipment used for the laboratory experiences. The Instron Hydraulic Universal Testing Machine (Figure 22), located in the Construction Materials Laboratory, is used to perform a tension test over calibrated specimens, in order to obtain the material modulus of elasticity.

DBD22

Figure 22 Tension Test Machine

Figure 23 presents the equipment used to perform the electronic measurement of strains on cantilever elements subjected to bending and torsional loads (manufacturer: Hi-Tech Scientific).

Fig20

Figure 23 Electronic Measurement of Strains

Figures 24 to 32 present schematics of the workstation used for all the remaining tests (manufacturer: TQ Education and Training). It consists of a testing frame (where the specimens are mounted), a data acquisition system (DAS) that collects the measurements in an electronic way, and a PC to display the DAS input in real time. Students also perform measures using manual instruments (dial gages, calibrated weights, calipers, among others).

DBD24

Figure 24 Structures Test frame
(Source: TQ Education and Training)

DBD25

Figure 25 Digital Force Display
(Source: TQ Education and Training)

DBD26

Figure 26 PC and DAS
(Source: TQ Education and Training)

Figures 27 to 30 presents the actual workstation with the equipment mounted to perform several tests, as described by each picture caption.

Fig14

Figure 27 Deflection of Beams Equipment

Fig15

Figure 28 Buckling of Columns Equipment

Fig16

Figure 29 Torsion of Circular Bars Equipment

Fig17

Figure 30 Shear Force Diagram Equipment

Fig18

Figure 31 Bending Moment Diagram Equipment

DBD32

Figure 32 Shear Center Equipment

 

6. Dr. Bernardo Deschapelles Duque

Bernardo Deschapelles Duque was born in 1929 in Habana, Cuba. In the Universidad de La Habana he completed a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering in 1952 and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1954. He obtained a Master of Science in Civil Engineering in 1981 from the California Western University and a PhD in Civil Engineering in 1983 from the California Coast University. He held various professional and academic positions in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Dr. Deschapelles was a professor of the Department of Civil Engineering of PUPR for over 38 years. He offered graduate courses and technical seminars in the Dominican Republic, Venezuela and Puerto Rico. He was author of various technical papers and discussions in journals from the ASCE and ACI. He also wrote several computer programs based on the Finite Element Method for the analysis of structures and soils, including soil-structure interaction. These programs have been available for the use by engineering and students. Dr. Deschapelles was co-founder of the Pan-American Academy of Engineers in 2000 in Panama City. He was also the first person to be named Honorary Member of the Dominican Society of Engineers and Architects. He was a Fellow member of the ASCE, a Honorary Member of the ACI, President of Earthquake Committee of the College of Engineers and Surveyors of Puerto Rico and Distinguished Professor of the School of Engineering of the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. After a long and distinguished professional career, Dr. Deschapelles passed away on October 2018. On March 10, 2019, the Structural Engineering Laboratory was renamed after Dr. Deschapelles.

Prof Deschapelles

Highway and Transportation Engineering Laboratory

1. Introduction

The Highway and Transportation Engineering Laboratory is focused in data collection techniques and use of equipment, computer software has associated with different types of transportation studies in which application of statistics and probability to analyze, interpret, manage, and present transportation data is required. It supports the courses CE 3320 (Highway Engineering), CE 3330 (Transportation Engineering and Urban Planning), and CE 3331 (Highway and Transportation Engineering Laboratory).

2. Staff

Table 1 Laboratory Staff

Resource Employment Status
Ginger Rossy, MSCE, EIT Assistant Professor, CE 3331
Ileana Meléndez, BSCE, MEM Laboratory Assistant

3. Facilities

The laboratory facilities are currently located in room L-411. that houses 20-computer workstation and 1 computer for the professor. The laboratory is expected to move sometime during this year to room P-202.

HTEL01

Figure 1 North – East Side of laboratory

HTEL02

Figure 2 South-West of laboratory

4. Tests conducted

The classes meet for two hours twice a week; safety and field test procedure briefs are followed by a presentation of the test. The students are provided with the required software to perform the data analysis of the respective tests. The following topics are covered as part of the laboratory course:

a. Volume Studies:

  • Purpose and applications
  • Methods of counting and equipment use
  • Field Procedures
  • Data analysis

b. Intersection Counts:

  • Count periods
  • Manual data collection techniques
  • Automatic data collection and use of equipment
  • Data conversion and presentation
  • Data analysis

c. Intersection Delay and Saturation Flow Measurement:

  • Manual procedure
  • Mechanical procedures and use of equipment

d. Arrivals and Departures:

  • Data collection techniques
  • Application of distribution probability models

e. Traffic Control Devices

  • Equipment and applications
  • Use of equipment
  • Filed inspection

f. Transportation Planning Data:

  • Area definition and zoning
  • Data collection and forecasting techniques
  • Data analysis

g. Parking Studies

5. Equipment

The Laboratory is equipped with the following items:

  • 21 High End Desktop Computers
  • 1 Digital Projector
  • 30 Traffic Tally Counters
  • 14 Portable Automatic Traffic Counters

The staff periodically maintain all the major equipment of the lab.

HTEL03

Figure 3 Traffic Tally Counter

HTEL04

Figure 4 Automatic Traffic Counter
(Source: Jamar Technologies)

HTEL05

Figure 5 Installation Tools

HTEL06

Figure 6 Installation of road tube

6. Software

Table 2 lists the software available at the Transportation and Highway Engineering Laboratory.

Table 2 Software

General Programs Quantity Company
Microsoft Windows 10 Site License Microsoft
Autocad 2016 Site License Autodesk
Microsoft Office 2016 Site License Microsoft
Highway and Transportation Programs Quantity Company
HCS 2010 23 McTrans
Sidra 23 Sidra Solutions

Environmental Engineering Laboratory

1. Introduction

The Environmental Engineering laboratory courses were designed to develop in the students the skills included in the programs objectives, which require the application of modern technologies and criteria throughout the planning and design processes of environmental systems.

1.1. Sequence Structure

For the Environmental Engineering Program, the Environmental Engineering Laboratory sequence is composed of two courses, Environmental Engineering Laboratory I (ENVE 4511) and Environmental Engineering Laboratory II (ENVE 4513). In the Civil Engineering Program, students take the course Environmental Engineering Laboratory (CE 4441).

1.2. Objectives

The objectives of the ENVE 4511 course are:

  • Learn how to take store and preserve water and wastewater samples.
  • Acquire and apply the laboratory techniques used to monitor the main physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water and wastewater.
  • Learn how to perform meteorological factors and air priority pollutants measurements.
  • Acquire knowledge of the laboratory techniques used to monitor the quality of water, wastewater, and air.
  • Develop critical reasoning skills for underlying analytical principles, quality assessment and control of environmental analyses
  • Learn how to write a technical laboratory report.
  • Learn how to work in groups.

The objectives of the ENVE 4513 course are:

  • Learn how to prepare, execute and analyze environmental engineering experiments.
  • Apply the principles of engineering design to laboratory experiments.
  • Learn how to execute and report measurements for air contaminants, solid waste physical properties, metals and dissolved components in wastewater, and absorption of Ultra Violet radiation to organic chemicals.
  • Develop critical reasoning skills for underlying analytical principles, quality assessment, and control of environmental analyses through experimental design.
  • Perform noise pollution tests in different life and industrial environments.
  • Learn how to prepare experimental reports.
  • Acquire further training in group work.

The objectives of the CE 4441 course are:

  • Learn how to take, store, and preserve water and wastewater samples.
  • Learn how to determine the main physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water and wastewater.
  • Understand how the laboratory measurement equipment works.
  • Learn how to perform meteorological factors measurements.
  • Develop critical reasoning skills for underlying analytical principles, quality assessment and control of environmental analyses.
  • Learn how to write a technical laboratory report.
  • Learn how to work in teams.

2. Enrollment

The maximum enrollment allowed for laboratory courses is 16 students.

3. Staff

The Environmental Engineering Laboratory courses are taught by one faculty member which is assisted by a full-time laboratory assistant. The laboratory assistant is usually assisted by a work-study undergraduate student. Background information on the current staff is presented in Table 1.

Table 1 Environmental Engineering Laboratory Staff

Resource Employment Status
Roger Malaver, PhD Associate Professor
Angel Noriega, MEM and BSChE Laboratory Assistant

 

4. Facilities

The facilities provided for the Environmental Engineering Laboratory courses are located in room L-103. The room is 27 feet wide and 34 feet long, with a separate office (180 square feet) for the laboratory assistant that is equipped with a computer, a printer and closets to store books and documents. Two working tables with drawers and cabinets are available for student work, plus three long counters where equipment and instruments are placed (Figure 1). The room is in compliance with fire protection, as well as with safety and health requirements (Figure 2). A list of the main equipment and instruments available is presented in section 7, together with illustrative photographs.

01

Figure 1 Environmental Engineering Laboratory Facilities

02
Figure 2 Safety Devices at the Environmental Engineering Laboratory Facilities

5. Measurements and Experiments Conducted

The laboratory courses are taught in two weekly sections of two hours, which include lectures and hands-on activities. Procedures and methods for the routines performed are provided in the form of manuals and handouts. All measurements and experiments performed by the students use methods, equipment and instruments which are accepted by regulatory agencies and used in the environmental field practice. Orientation is also provided on report structure and content.

Wastewater samples are obtained from the Caguas WWTP, as a courtesy of the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewerage Authority. Potable water samples are collected from tap. Soil samples are typical of Puerto Rico, and are previously ground, screened and dried. Chemicals used are all reagent grade. The laboratory is equipped with water distillation and deionization units. A description of the measurements and experiments performed by the students in each class is presented below.

5.1. Environmental Engineering Laboratory I (ENVE 4511) and Environmental Engineering Laboratory (CE 4441)

5.1.1. Meteorological Factors
In this exercise students collect data from the meteorological station available in the roof of the building, interpret it and report on findings and conclusions related to precipitation and evaporation, wind speed and direction, and atmospheric temperature.

5.1.2. Color, Turbidity, and Temperature
Measurements are performed on water samples for temperature, color and turbidity. The relevance of each different physical characteristic on water quality is discussed, and the difference between apparent and actual color is experimentally determined.

5.1.3. Solids
Measurements are conducted for total, suspended, and dissolved solids, using gravimetric analysis. The Inhoff cone is used to measure settleable solids. The relevance of these parameters on water quality is discussed, as well as the origin of each different type of solid constituent.

5.1.4. pH, Alkalinity, and Hardness
Measurements are conducted for pH, using standard pH meters. Topics discussed include the definition of pH, the physical characteristics of water that affect its value, and the importance of using well calibrated instruments. Measurements conducted for water alkalinity use titration with sulfuric acid aided by pH indicators. Topics discussed include the definition of alkalinity, the constituents in water that cause alkalinity, and its relevance for water treatment and water quality. Measurements are also conducted for hardness in water, using a titration method. Topics discussed include the definition of hardness, the typical species in water that constitute hardness, and the relevance of hardness for water treatment and water quality.

5.1.5. Jar Test
The Jar test procedure is performed for a raw water sample, to detect optimum coagulant and alkalinity requirements for optimum coagulation, flocculation and settling of the respective raw water. The routine includes adequate design, performance and interpretation of the test and the results obtained. The procedure also allows the calculation of design overflow rates for the settling tanks.

5.1.6. Chlorine and Conductivity
Electric conductivity of water samples is measured using conductivity meters. The relationship of electric conductivity in water and its dissolved solids content is discussed. Measurements for total and free chlorine in water samples are performed in the same laboratory session, using colorimetric methods. The concepts of chlorine demand, dose, and residual are discussed.

5.1.7. Dissolved Oxygen
Measurement of dissolved oxygen content in water samples are performed using a colorimetric method. Emphasis is placed on the need for proper sampling procedure to be adopted in the field to assure representative measurements. The importance of oxygen in water bodies is discussed.

5.1.8. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD)
COD is measured for wastewater samples, using a colorimetric measurement of chemically oxidized samples. The concept of COD is discussed, as well as the water constituents that may potentially contribute to COD. BOD is measured for wastewater samples using a respirometric procedure, which incubates samples at 20oC. The concepts of BOD and BOD5 are discussed, as well as the water constituents that may potentially contribute to BOD. The difference between COD and BOD is well established.

5.1.9. Microbiological Characteristics of Water
Measurements are conducted to determine the microbiological characteristics of both potable water and wastewater. The Presence/Absence measurement is performed on tap water samples to detect the presence of coliform species, which would render the water not potable. The measurement of the most probable number (MPN) of microorganism colonies in wastewater samples is also performed. This measurement is required to determine WWTP effluent compliance with NPDES discharge permits.

5.2. Environmental Engineering Laboratory II (ENVE 4513)

5.2.1. Solid Waste measurements: Characterization and physical properties
Solid waste samples are collected by the students and characterized in a two-session module. The sample is first characterized with respect to the fraction of each type of waste present, both organic and inorganic nature. Ana apparent density is then measured for each fraction, to determine the space occupied by each fraction relative to each other. Measurements are then performed for moisture content, dry mass and ash content for food waste and paper samples.

5.2.2. Wastewater measurements: Chemical Methods and Atomic Absorption
Measurements are conducted on water samples for the detection of metals and ions in a two-session module. The first module uses wet chemistry methods combined with spectophotometric detection. The second method uses atomic absorption, with special emphasis on the development of calibration curves.

5.2.3. Measurement of Ambient Air Particulates
Air particulates in air are measured using membrane filtration coupled with gravimetric determination. This routine is useful for characterization of both ambient and atmospheric air samples.

5.2.4. Measurement of soil physicochemical properties: Organic matter content and pH
Two physicochemical properties of a typical soil from Puerto Rico are measured in these two modules. First, the organic matter content of the soil is measured by incineration combined with gravimetric measurements. Then, the pH of the soil sample is measured by the mass titration method.

5.2.5. Adsorption Experiment
The adsorption isotherm of an organic compound on activated carbon is measured using the bottle-point method. Students prepare the reactors and place them on rotators for equilibrium. Liquid phase concentrations are measured by UV spectrophotometry. Solid phase concentrations are obtained by mass balances. Emphasis is given to determination of calibration curves. The isotherm data is fitted to adsorption models using linearization methods and regression analysis. Due to its length, this experimental procedure takes two sessions of two hours each, plus one session for discussion of theory and methods for data analysis.

5.2.6. Microbial Characteristics of Water
The heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) is measured for a wastewater sample, using filtration, followed by plate growth and microscopic reading.

5.2.7. Chromatography
Volatile organic compounds are measured in water samples by Gas Chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID) and Non-volatile organic compounds are measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection.

5.2.8. Head Loss Through Porous Media
To develop pressure drop profiles (hL vs. filter depth) for different filtration velocities (vf). To model the pressure drop through the column as a function of filtration velocity.
Collect all the data using the excel program and present a graph containing the profiles for head loss as a function of filter depth having filtration velocity as a parameter; and finally calculate the constant for the hydraulic model (k1 and k2).

5.3. Evaluation

The basic instruments for evaluation of both laboratory courses are exam and experimental reports. The exams evaluate the knowledge of the students on background information in the subjects composing the course, on experimental procedures and methods, and o calculations and models used. The reports include presentation of background information, methods and materials, examples of calculations, statistical and error analysis, and presentation and discussion of results. Report presentation is also evaluated. Photographs of students working during laboratory sessions are presented in Figure 3.

03
Figure 3 Students Performing Laboratory Work

6. Equipment Maintenance and Calibration

To the extent possible, maintenance and calibration of equipment and instrumentation is performed by laboratory assisting personnel. When required, supplier representatives are called in for maintenance or calibration.

7. Equipment

Figures 4 to 14 show the main equipment and instrumentation used at the environmental engineering laboratory.

04
Figure 4 Meteorological Station

05

Figure 5 pH Meter, Turbidimeter, Conductivity Meter, Spectrophotometer, Centrifuge, and Air Pump

06
Figure 6 Filtration Unit and Balances

07

Figure 7 Microscopes, Respirometer (BOD), Digestion Unit (COD), Incubator (PA/MPN)

08
Figure 8 Oven and Furnace

09

Figure 9 Jar Test System

10

Figure 10 Atomic Absorption and UV/Vis Spectrophotometer

11

Figure 11 Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatograph

12

Figure 12 Filtration Column and Air Monitors

13

Figure 13 BOD Apparatus

14

Figure 14 Soxhlet Extractor Equipment

Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory

1. Introduction

The Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory is located at room P-201 and is divided in three areas:

  • The computer laboratory hardware area, where the computers, printer and plotter are located (Figure 1),
  • The land surveying equipment warehouse, and
  • The laboratory assistant’s office

01

Figure 1 Computer Laboratory Area

The computer laboratory area has a ceiling-mounted computer projector that is used for lecture instruction, software applications and student presentations. All computers have internet access and are networked to the other computing laboratories of the Civil & Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying (CEELS) Department.

The laboratory has three principal uses:

  • A computer center for the CEELS Department graduate and undergraduate students.
  • A classroom computer assisted for presentations made by professors and students.
  • A warehouse for the Land Surveying equipment.

Each academic term, several professors of the Department teach their courses in the Laboratory to use the computer facilities. The students of the Civil Engineering Program use this laboratory to take the CEE 2311 – Algorithms, Programming and Numerical Analysis Laboratory course. The land surveying equipment stored in the warehouse area is used for the SURV 2095 – Principles of Surveying for Engineers Laboratory

The Laboratory is open Mondays through Thursdays from 1:00 PM to 8:00 PM and Fridays from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM.

2. Staff

Table 1 summarizes the personnel that teach or assist at the Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory.

Table 1 Laboratory staff

Resource Employment Status
Marcos Colón Assistant Professor, Land Surveying courses
Gustavo Pacheco, PhD Professor, CEE 2311
Victor Romero, MSEM Associate Professor, Land Surveying courses
Ileana Meléndez, MEM, BSCE Laboratory Assistant

 

3. Equipment and Software

Tables 2, 3 and 4 summarize the main equipment and software currently available at the Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory.

Table 2 Basic Hardware available in the Engineering Simulation and Land Surveying Laboratory
Equipment Quantity Model
Desktop Computers 20 DELL Precision T5500
Desktop Computers 1 Dell Optiplex 780
Printer 1 Xerox Phaser 7100
Plotter 1 OCE CS236
Projector 1 Panasonic LB75NT XGA

 

Table 3 Software available in the Engineering Simulations and land Surveying Laboratory
General Programs Quantity Company
Microsoft Windows 10 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Office 2016 Site License Microsoft
Auto CAD 2019 Site License Auto Desk
Sketchup 2018 30 Sketchup
Avast Antivirus Avast
Water Resources Eng. Programs Quantity Company
HEC-1 Unlimited U.S Corps of Engineers
HEC-2 Unlimited U.S. Corps of Engineers
HEC-RAS Unlimited U.S. Corps of Engineers
Land Surveying Quantity Company
 ArCMap 30 EsRI
Structural Engineering Programs Quantity Company
ETABS 30 CSI
SAP2000 30 CSI
Visual Analysis Site License IES, Educational
MD Solids Site License Educational
Geotechnical Engineering Programs Quantity Company
Apile, LPile, Shaft 1 (10 users) Ensoft
Plaxis V8 1 (10 users) Plaxis
Geostudio 2004 1 Geostudio
Construction Engineering Programs Quantity Company
Primavera Site License ORACLE
MS Project Site License Microsoft
CYPE 30 Cype Ingenieros S.A.

Table 4 Land Surveying Laboratory Instruments

Instrument Type Instrument Description Type and its Software Quantity
GPS TOPCON GR-3, RTK Base and Rover 1
GPS ALTUS ,RTK Base and Rover 1
GPS TRIMBLE 4600LS Static Antenna 3
GPS Hand GPS TOPCON GMS-2 with Top Surv soft (1 unit) and Top Pad Soft and ArcPad 7.1 (3 units) 4
GPS DATA Hand Data Collector for GPS, ARCHER FIELD PC 2
DC Data Collector TDS RECON 5
DC Data Collector TDS NOMAD 4
TS Total Station GoWin TOPCON TKS-202 2
TS Total Station LEICA TC- 407 4
TS Total Station TOPCON GTS 239W 4
TS Total Station TOPCON GPT 2009 2
TS Total Station TOPCON GTS-213 2
TS Total Station SOUTH 3
DL Digital Level 200 SERIES 2
DL TOPCON Digital Level DL-102C 3
DL Pipe David White Pipe Digital Level 3
DL RL TOPCON Rotating Level RL-H3C 3
L Auto Level TOP-JR AT-24A 8
L Automatic Level TOPCON AT-G6 13

Figures 2 and 3 illustrate the laboratory laser printer and the inkjet plotter, where the students can print their computer documents and schoolworks using the institution Equitrac System.

02
Figure 2 Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory Printer System

03
Figure 3 Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Plotter

4. Equipment Maintenance

Every academic term the laboratory assistant checks the software for updates and license renewal and checks the status of the computers, printer and plotter to verify if they need maintenance or repair. Every summer the laboratory assistant checks to verify if the land surveying equipment needs calibration.

GIS and Cartography Laboratory

1. Introduction

The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Cartography Laboratory serves as classroom and computer room with GIS specialized software. Its located at the Pavilions Building, room P-203. The laboratory has sixteen (16) seating capacity (Figure 1) with a high-quality scanner (Figure 2). The laboratory also has a ceiling-mounted computer projector that is used for lecture instruction, software applications and student presentations. All computers have internet access and are networked to the other computing laboratories of the Civil & Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying (CEELS) Department.

gislab1

Figure 1 GIS Laboratory

gislab2

Figure 2 Laboratory Scanner

Each academic term, several professors of the Department teach their courses in the Laboratory to use the computer facilities. The students of the Civil Engineering Program use this laboratory for some meetings of the CEE 3410 – Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering course. They also use the GIS software in the laboratory for some course projects.

The Laboratory is open Mondays through Thursdays from 1:00 PM to 8:00 PM and Fridays from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM.

2. Staff

Table 1 summarizes the personnel that teach or assist at the GIS and Cartography Laboratory.

Table 1 Laboratory Staff

Resource Employment Status
Raúl Matos, PhD Associate Professor, GIS and Cartography courses
Christian Villalta, PhD Associate Professor, CEE 3410
Ileana Meléndez, MEM, BSCE Laboratory Assistant

3. Equipment and Software

Tables 2 and 3 illustrate the main equipment and software currently available at the Geographic Information Systems and Cartography Laboratory.

Table 2: Basic hardware available at Geographic Information Systems Laboratory
Equipment Quantity Model
Desktop Computers 16 DELL Precision T3500
Desktop Computers 1 Dell Precision T7600
Scanner 1 EPSON GT-20000
Plotter 1 HP Designjet 510
Projector 1 Panasonic LB75NT XGA

 

Table 3 Basic Software available at the GIS and Cartography Laboratory
General Programs Quantity Company
Microsoft Windows 10 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Office 2016 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Visio 2016 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Project 2016 Site License Microsoft
Map 3D 2014 Site License Auto Desk
Google Earth Site License Google
Specialized Programs Quantity Company
ArcGIS for Desktop 10.7.1 17 ESRI
3D Analyst 17 ESRI
Geostatistical Analyst 17 ESRI
Spatial Analyst 17 ESRI
QGIS 2.14.0 GNU General Public License QGIS
Geomedia Professional 2015 15 Hexagon Geospatial
APOLLO Essentials 2015 1 Hexagon Geospatial
WinTopo Freeware SoftSoft Ltd
Corpscon Freeware U.S Corps of Engineers
ILWIS GNU General Public License 52°North
GeoDa GNU General Public License GeoDa Center
PostgreSQL GNU General Public License PostgreSQL Global Development Group

4. Equipment Maintenance

Every academic term the laboratory assistant checks the software for updates and license renewal and checks the status of the computers, printer and plotter to verify if they need maintenance or repair.

Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory

1. Introduction

The Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory serves as classroom and computer room with Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry specialized software. It is located at the Pavilions Building, Room P-204. The laboratory has seats for fifteen (15) students with the corresponding computers (Figure 1). The laboratory also has a ceiling-mounted computer projector that is used for lecture instruction, software applications and student presentations. All computers have internet access and are networked to the other computing laboratories of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying.

RSLab1

Figure 1 Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory

The Land Surveying and Mapping students take several courses in this laboratory, including the Elements of Photogrammetry course.

The Laboratory is open Mondays through Thursdays from 12:00 m to 6:30 PM and Fridays from 12:00 m to 3:00 PM.

2. Equipment and Software

Tables 1 and 2 illustrate the main equipment and software currently available at the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory.

Table 1: Basic hardware available at Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory
Equipment Quantity Model
Desktop Computers 15 DELL Precision T3600
Desktop Computers 1 Dell Precision T7600
Projector 1 Panasonic LB75NT XGA

 

Table 2: Basic Software available at Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Laboratory
General Programs Quantity Company
Microsoft Windows 10 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Office 2016 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Visio 2016 Site License Microsoft
Microsoft Project 2016 Site License Microsoft
Auto CAD 2019 Site License Auto Desk
Google Earth Google
Specialized Programs Quantity Company
Carlson 2014 9 Carlson Software, Inc.
Geomatica 2014 16 PCI Geomatics
QGIS 2.14.0 GNU General Public License QGIS
ERDAS IMAGINE 2015 14 Hexagon Geospatial
Corpscon Freeware U.S. Corps of Engineers

3. Equipment Maintenance

Every academic term the software are revised for updates and license renewal, and every three years the laboratory computers are updated to the latest in the market, as per laboratory necessity. This is one way to guarantee that our students are receiving, in a reasonable time intervals, the state of the art in computer technologies.

Department Personnel

Faculty

ALSAADI, BALHAN ALTAYEB
Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain, 1988; M.S.C.E. and B.S.C.E., Trian Vuia Polytechnic Institute, Timisoara, Romania, 1984
Area of Interest: Structural Engineering
E-mail Address: balsaadi@pupr.edu
Phone: X-496 

BORRAGEROS LEZAMA, JOSÉ
Professor, M.S.C.E., Texas A & M University, 1985; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1984, PE
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: jborrage@pupr.edu
Phone: X-356 

COLL BORGO, MANUEL E.
Lecturer II, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2001; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1994, PE
Area of Interest: Structural Engineering
E-mail Address: mcoll@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

COLLAZOS ORDÓÑEZ, OMAIRA
Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Missouri, 2003; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993; B.S.C.E., University of Cauca, Colombia, 1989
Area of Interest: Geotechnical Engineering
E-mail Address: ocollazos@pupr.edu
Phone: X-625 

COLÓN MERCADO, MARCOS
Assistant Professor, Master in Environmental Management, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 2003; Bachelor of Science in Surveying and Topography, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993, PS
Area of Interest: Construction and Mapping Surveying
E-mail Address: macolon@pupr.edu
Phone: X-607 

CRUZADO VÉLEZ, HÉCTOR J.
Professor and Department Head, Ph.D. in Wind Science and Engineering, Texas Tech University, 2007; M.S.C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1998; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1996, PE
Area of Interest: Structural Engineering
E-mail Address: hcruzado@pupr.edu
Phone: X-436 

DELGADO LOPERENA, DHARMA
Professor, Ph.D. in Human Environmental Sciences, University of Missouri, 2004; M. Arch., University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, 1983; B. in Environmental Design, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, 1981
Area of Interest: Construction Engineering
E-mail Address: ddelgado@pupr.edu
Phone: X-626 

FERNÁNDEZ VALENCIA, MARÍA DE LOURDES
Lecturer II, M.S. in Environmental Management, Metropolitan University of Puerto Rico, 1997; Bachelor in Human Communication Therapy, National Institute of Human Communication, Mexico City, Mexico, 1989
Area of Interest: Environmental Risk Management
Email address: mfernandez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

FONT, JOSÉ C.
Lecturer II, MBA, Turabo University, 1993; B.S.Ch.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1984
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: jfont@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

MALAVER MUÑOZ, ROGER
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering, University of Sherbrooke, Canada, 1999; M.S.Ch.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993; B.S.Ch.E., National University of San Marcos, Peru, 1990; B.S. Food Technology Engineering, Villarreal University, Peru, 1987 Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: rmalave@pupr.edu
Phone: X-317 

MARTE DE LA MOTA, ROBERTO
Associate Professor, M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2001; M.E.C.E., Technological Institute of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 1998, B.S.C.E., Technological Institute of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 1997, PE
Area of Interest: Structural Engineering
E-mail Address: rmarte@pupr.edu
Phone: X-669 

MARTÍNEZ GÁMEZ, JOSÉ A.
Professor, M.S.C.E., University of California-Berkeley, 1987; B.S.C.E., Albert Einstein University, El Salvador, 1984, PE
Area of Interest: Geotechnical Engineering
E-mail Address: amartine@pupr.edu
Phone: X-438 

MATOS FLORES, RAÚL
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Geographic Information Technology, University of Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain, 2017; Master of Science in Geographic Information Systems, Huddersfield University, United Kingdom, 2002; Master in Planning, University of Puerto Rico, 1997; Bachelor of Arts in Geography, University of Puerto Rico, 1991
Area of Interest: Cartography and Geographic Information Systems
E-mail Address: ramatos@pupr.edu
Phone: X-615 

MELÉNDEZ AGUILAR, ÁNGEL R.
Lecturer II, M.B.A., University of Phoenix, Guaynabo Campus, 1995; B.S.Ch.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1991, EIT
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: anmelendez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

MODESTO ORTIZ, PEDRO
Lecturer II, M.E.M., Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1995; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1984, PE
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: pmodesto@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

PACHECO CROSETTI, GUSTAVO
Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2007; M.S. in Finite Element Method, UNED, Spain, 1996; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993; B.S.C.E. and M.S.C.E., National University of Córdoba, Argentina, 1988, PE
Area of Interest: Structural Engineering
E-mail Address: gpacheco@pupr.edu
Phone: X-452 

RIVERA GUZMÁN, NÉSTOR
Lecturer I, B.S. in Geology, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1985, PG
Area of Interest: Geology
E-mail Address: nerivera@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

RODRIGUEZ CABRERA, JULIO
Lecturer I, Bachelor of Science in Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1979
Area of Interest: Dendrology
E-mail Address: jurodriguez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

RODRÍGUEZ MORALES, HANNA K.
Lecturer II, Master in Engineering Management, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 2014; Master in Waste Management and Treatment, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, 2010; B.S.Env.E., North Carolina State University, 2008, PE
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: harodriguez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

ROMERO GONZÁLEZ, VICTOR
Associate Professor, M.S.E.M., Metropolitan University, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2006; B.S.C.E., Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 2019;  Bachelor of Science in Land Surveying and Mapping, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1994, PS, EIT
Area of Interest: Surveying, Remote Sensing, and Photogrammetry
E-mail Address: vromero@pupr.edu
Phone: X-610 

ROSSY ROBLES, GINGER
Assistant Professor, Ph.D. Candidate in Civil Engineering, University of Missouri; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2002; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1996, EIT
Area of Interest: Transportation Engineering
E-mail Address: grossy@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453 

TORRES RIVERA, REINALDO
Associate Professor, M. Arch., University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, 1987; B. in Environmental Design, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, 1983
Area of Interest: Architecture
E-mail Address: rtorres@pupr.edu
Phone: X-379 

VÉLEZ GALLEGO, AMADO
Associate Professor and Associate Department Head, M.S.C.E., University of Texas at Austin, 1996; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993
Area of Interest: Transportation Engineering
E-mail Address: avelez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-311 

VILLALTA CALDERÓN, CHRISTIAN
Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2009; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2004; B.S.C.E., University of Costa Rica, 2000
Area of Interest: Environmental Engineering
E-mail Address: cvillalta@pupr.edu
Phone: X-695

Administrative

LORENZANA COLLAZO, ISABEL
Assistant to the Department Head in Academic Affairs and Assistant at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory
E-mail address: ilorenza@pupr.edu
Phone: X-408

MELÉNDEZ RODRÍGUEZ, ILEANA
Assistant at the Engineering Simulations and Land Surveying Laboratory and the Highway and Transportation Engineering Laboratory
E-mail address: imelende@pupr.edu
Phone: X-415

MONTILLA TURBIDES, SALVADOR
Assistant at the Construction Materials Laboratory and the Structural Engineering Laboratory
E-mail address: smontill@pupr.edu
Phone: X-434

NORIEGA CASTELLANO, ANGEL
Assistant at the Environmental Engineering Laboratory
E-mail address: annoriega@pupr.edu
Phone: X-413

RODRÍGUEZ CASTRO, CARMEN
Secretary
E-mail address: crodriguez@pupr.edu
Phone: X-453

Contact

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying is located at Room L-108 of the Laboratories Building of the San Juan Campus. The office hours are: Monday thru Thursday: 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM and Friday: 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Telephones: (787) 622-8000, extensions 453, 436, 311, and 610. You can contact the Department Head Héctor J. Cruzado, the Associate Department Head Amado Vélez, or the Coordinator of the Land Surveying Program Víctor Romero at their e-mail addresses: hcruzado@pupr.edu, avelez@pupr.edu, and vromero@pupr.edu.  

Areas of Specialty

Structural Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that focuses on the analysis and design of structures, such as buildings and bridges. Structural engineers are responsible for the making of safe and functional structures capable of resisting loads, like those produced by earthquakes and hurricanes.

Transportation Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that applies scientific principles to the planning, analysis, design, and operations of transportation systems such as highways, railways, marine ports, and airports to provide for the safe, rapid, confortable, convenient, economical, and environmentally compatible movement of people and goods.

Geotechnical Engineering

The area of study of civil engineering that applies earth sciences to investigate the mechanical properties of soils, their behavior, and their ability to resist loads, such as those produced by superstructures.

Environmental Engineering

The discipline that applies science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment. It deals with water resources, water quality and treatment, waste water treatment and disposal, air pollution control, solid and hazardous waste management, occupational safety and health, environmental toxicology, environmental impact assessment, public health issues, and pollution prevention.

Construction Engineering

The area of study that applies managerial sciences to the engineering processes involved in the construction of superstructure and infrastructure projects, such as buildings, bridges, highways, airports, railroads, dams, and utilities. Construction engineers ensure that the construction is carried out in accordance with the design drawings and specifications and the contract documents.

Land Surveying and Mapping

Land Surveying and Mapping is the science of determining the position of points on the surface of the Earth through the application of mathematics and the use of specialized instruments. Surveying includes the measurement of angles and distances, the establishment of horizontal and vertical control points, plan confection, cadastral measurements, highway tracing and building locations, submarine topography and oceanic depths, plus the location of legal boundaries.

Facts

Civil Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) started to be offered at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico in 1974 and the first graduating class, formed by 17 students, obtained the degree in 1977. Up to July 2019, a total of 2,897 students have obtained a BSCE at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, San Juan Campus. The 2005 graduating class of our BSCE program was the largest with 150 students and the 1982 graduating class was the smallest with 10 students.

Since 2003 the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico grants a medal to the civil engineering graduate with the highest grade point average. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Katia Nazario Fernández (2003)
  • Roxana Hernández Pastrana (2004)
  • Jorge J. Echeandía González (2005)
  • Alejandro Abrams González (2006)
  • Josué M. Rivera Reyes (2007)
  • Francheska M. Figueroa Vélez (2008)
  • Richard Lizardi Chapel (2009)
  • Verónica T. De Freitas Nicholson (2010)
  • Flora M. Colom Acosta (2011)
  • Inés V. Brás Silva (2012)
  • Silvio R. Martínez Jerez (2013)
  • Luca Barbarossa Baccaro (2014)
  • Jackeline Rivera Sánchez (2015)
  • Kettsy García Santiago (2016)
  • Enrique G. Méndez Cuevas (2017)
  • Manuel E. Porrata Arbona (2018)
  • Mayreni Rodríguez Rivera (2019)

 

Note: A special recognition was given in 2005 to Adolfo I. Ayuso Saez for his academic excellence.

Since 2006 the Institute of Civil Engineers of the College of Engineers and Land Surveyors of Puerto Rico grants the Eng. Max Figueroa Domínguez Medal to the most outstanding civil engineering graduate with academic excellence. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Alejandro Abrams González (2006)
  • Josué M. Rivera Reyes (2007)
  • Francheska M. Figueroa Vélez (2008)
  • Richard Lizardi Chapel (2009)
  • Verónica T. De Freitas Nicholson (2010)
  • Flora M. Colom Acosta (2011)
  • Jonathan Herrera Roldán (2012)
  • Silvio R. Martínez Jerez (2013)
  • Luca Barbarossa Baccaro (2014)
  • Jackeline Rivera Sánchez (2015)
  • Kettsy García Santiago (2016)
  • Enrique G. Méndez Cuevas (2017)
  • Manuel E. Porrata Arbona (2018)
  • Mayreni Rodríguez Rivera (2019)

 

Environmental Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering (BSEnvE) started to be offered at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico in 1997 and the first graduating class, formed by five students, obtained the degree in year 2000. Up to July 2019, a total of 344 students have obtained a BSEnvE at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. The 2009 graduating class of our BSEnvE program was the largest with 25 students and that the 2001 class was the smallest with four students.

Since 2003 the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico grants a medal to the environmental engineering graduate with the highest grade point average. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Juan M. Amador Gutiérrez (2003)
  • Lourdes M. Morales Cuevas (2004)
  • Eduardo González Eisenmann (2005)
  • Giselle Balaguer Dátiz (2006)
  • Karen A. Díaz Rivera (2007)
  • Madeline Rivera Figueroa (2008)
  • Alejandro Pinto Flores (2009)
  • Elizabeth Rosas Pérez (2010)
  • Damián Cuadrado Sánchez (2011)
  • Luis A. Méndez Santos (2012)
  • Carina López Cabrera (2013)
  • Widallys Collazo Hernández (2014)
  • Solanch S. Pastrana Del Valle (2015)
  • Edward I. Westerband Martínez (2016)
  • Laura G. Roldán Hernández (2017)
  • Natalie N. Giró Batista (2018)
  • Mónica M. Aponte Alequín (2019)

 

Note: A special recognition was given in 2008 to Annette M. Fernández Rosario for her academic excellence.

Since 2010 the Institute of Environmental Engineers of the College of Engineers and Land Surveyors of Puerto Rico grants the Eng. Rafael Miranda Franco Medal to the most outstanding environmental engineering graduate with academic excellence. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Elizabeth Rosas Pérez (2010)
  • Damián Cuadrado Sánchez (2011)
  • Luis A. Méndez Santos (2012)
  • Carina López Cabrera (2013)
  • Widallys Collazo Hernández (2014)
  • Solanch S. Pastrana Del Valle (2015)
  • Edward I. Westerband Martínez (2016)
  • Laura G. Roldán Hernández (2017)
  • Natalie N. Giró Batista (2018)
  • Mónica M. Aponte Alequín (2019)

Land Surveying and Mapping

The Bachelor of Science in Land Surveying and Mapping (BSLSM) started to be offered at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico in 1966. Up to July 2019, a total of 588 students have obtained a BSLSM at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico.

Since 2003 the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico grants a medal to the land surveying and mapping graduate with the highest grade point average. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Norman Orisini Rosado (2003)
  • John A. Eby (2004)
  • Rafael L. Ocasio Declet (2005)
  • Roberto Fernandini Torré (2006)
  • Dennise M. Ribot Díaz (2007)
  • Janette I. Rivera Franco (2008)
  • Manuel De la Mata De Jesús (2009)
  • Rafael E. Rivera Herrera (2010)
  • Juan L. Amaro Amaro (2011)
  • Álvaro Morales Vargas (2012)
  • Francisco J. Acevedo Claudio (2013)
  • Steven D. Gelpí Torres (2014)
  • Francisco J. De Benney Figueroa (2015)
  • Ángel L. Román Rodríguez (2016)
  • Leomar Berríos Barreto (2017)
  • Emmanuel Pérez Santiago (2018)
  • Sergio I. Montañez Figueroa (2019)

Since 2011 the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico grants the Surveyor Francisco (Paco) Lugo Medal to the most outstanding land surveying and mapping graduate. The students who have received this medal are:

  • Ricardo García Cana (2011)
  • Álvaro Morales Vargas (2012)
  • Emérito Santiago Ramos (2013)
  • José F. López Rivera (2014)
  • Anthony Orlandi Gúzman (2015)
  • Carlos Y. Aponte Mariani (2016)
  • Leomar Berríos Barreto (2017)
  • Emmanuel Pérez Santiago (2018)
  • Joel Leví Vázquez Márquez (2019)

 

Department

The following students have graduated Summa Cum Laude from the undergraduate programs of our department:

  • Norman Orisini Rosado (2003) (Land Surveying and Mapping)
  • Jorge J. Echeandía González (2005) (Civil Engineering)
  • Adolfo I. Ayuso Sáez (2005) (Civil Engineering)
  • Francheska M. Figueroa Vélez (2008) (Civil Engineering)
  • Janette I. Rivera Franco (2008) (Land Surveying and Mapping)
  • Alejandro Pinto Flores (2009) (Environmental Engineering)
  • Inés V. Brás Silva (2012) (Civil Engineering)
  • Jonathan Herrera Roldán (2012) (Civil Engineering)
  • Silvio R. Martínez Jerez (2013) (Civil Engineering)
  • Carina López Cabrera (2013) (Environmental Engineering)
  • Luca Barbarossa Baccaro (2014) (Civil Engineering)
  • Kettsy García Santiago (2016) (Civil Engineering)
  • Mónica M. Aponte Alequín (2019) (Environmental Engineering)