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Research

Sponsored Research Office

The Sponsored Research Office (SRO) is in charge of supporting the University Goal of fostering an applied research environment. It supports researchers in all disciplines by providing information about appropriate sources of external grant and fellowship support for their research and by working with them to prepare grant proposals and budgets. The office is in charge of ensuring that all the proposals submitted on behalf of the institution are in compliance with external and internal regulations. The office personnel also review the proposals before submission for accuracy, completeness, and reasonableness of the budget. The SRO is also responsible for submitting all proposals on behalf of Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico.

Proposal Submission Process

This document will provide investigators and administrators with the information they need to prepare external grant proposals.

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1. The Principal Investigator/Program Director (PI/PD) has the responsibility of writing the narrative and budget of his/her proposal document. However, the SRO will provide advice and help as needed by the PI/PD to prepare a correct budget for the specific agency or sponsor, and the SRO staff will be available to provide one-on-one assistance on a first-come first-served basis.

2. The Sponsored Research Office requires advanced notification that proposals are under development for submission. Whether the PI/PD requires assistance of the SRO for the preparation of the proposal or not, it is recommended that such a notification be submitted at least three months before the proposal submission deadline. In any case, the SRO must be notified in writing at least one (1) month before the proposal submission deadline.

The notification must include:

  • The name of the program and agency/sponsor
  • The request for proposal (RFP) or equivalent document
  • The deadline for submission of the proposal
  • Any other requirements (such as cost-sharing, compliance, subcontracts, etc.).

3. In order to submit a proposal, the SRO requires that a complete and final version of the proposal is submitted to the office at least six (6) working days prior to the submission deadline. Proposals involving subcontracts or other special interactions with other institutions will require more time than this six-day minimum to be determined on a case by case basis.

4. Any proposal must be accompanied by a letter of support (LOS) from the head of the respective department. If the proposal involves graduate students or graduate programs it must also have a letter of support from the Graduate School Dean. If the proposal affects more than one department, a LOS from corresponding school Dean is required. If the proposal affects more than one school, a LOS from the Vice-President of Academic Affairs is required. The SRO will be in charge of requesting letters of support from the President, if required, once all the previously mentioned letters are submitted to the SRO.

5. A complete proposal must include at least:

  • Project Summary or Abstract
  • Project Narrative
  • Budget
  • Budget Justification
  • Letters of support as specified in item 4.
  • Any mandatory document specified in the call for proposal.

6. If a program allows only one submission per institution, the first person notifying in writing the SRO of his/her intentions to submit a proposal to that program will have the right to submit.

7. The PI/PD who does not to notify the SRO about his/her intention to submit a proposal in a timely manner will face the possibility of an institutional denial to submit such a proposal.

8. Even if the narrative portion is under development, the budget should be provided to the SRO as early as possible in the process for review. Having this in advance of the deadline enables our staff to review the budget according to the agency requirements and university policies. This gives time to the PI/PD to make corrections to the budget even before the narrative is finished.

The SRO has established these requirements in order to better serve the institutional and departmental goals as well as standardize the procedure for all our researchers and other individuals pursing external funding, and to be able to contribute to an increasingly demanding research proposal agenda.

For any additional information, please contact us.

 

sro

Contact Information

Sponsored Research Office

Office P-102 
PO Box 192017 
San Juan, PR 00919-2017 
or 
377 Ponce de León Avenue
 San Juan, PR 00918

Voice: (787) 7517581 
Fax: (787) 7672129

Angel Gonzalez-Lizardo, PhD

Director
Voice: 787 622 8000 xt 322

Enid Alvarez

Grant Writer
Voice: 787 622 8000 ext 456
ealvarez@pupr.edu

Provi Garcia

Secretary
(787) 622-8000 ext 487

 

Intellectual Property Procedures

Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico is supporting and encouraging the submission of patent applications from faculty and staff, according to the current Intellectual Property Policy approved on February 24th, 2010. This effort is done to incentivize the production of intellectual property that benefits both, the IP originators and the university. The following steps will be followed to submit an application for patent:

1. The applicant will fill an Intellectual Property Disclosure Form and submit it to the Sponsored Research Office (SRO).

2. The SRO will hire a firm to conduct a Patent Search, and will determine if the Intellectual Property (IP) is considered a University Assisted or Assigned Effort or an Individual Effort. Based on the outcomes of the patent search, the SRO will submit a recommendation to the Intellectual Property Committee (IPC).

3. The IPC decides if the University will pursue a patent for the submitted IP.

4. If the University IPC decides to pursue the patent,

- The applicant will fill out an Originator Assignment Document

- The SRO will hire a firm to conduct a patent application. The applicant will meet with the firm personnel for any further explanation necessary in the generation of the claims for the patent application.

5. Once the patent pending status is documented, the University may initiates negotiations for the commercialization of the Intellectual Property.

6. If the University decides not to pursue the patent, the applicant may request a copy of the IP decision to pursue the patent of the IP on his/her own.

 

patent

 

Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico

Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

Research and Development Capabilities

  • Summary of Sponsored Projects Developed
  • Faculty Specialty and Research Interests Faculty
  • Research Experience

Sponsored Research and Development Projects

This section presents the sponsored research and development activities developed by CEED faculty members as PI or Co-PI of the projects. The projects are listed chronologically; the document includes the PI and Co-PI, the sponsor institution (agency or industry), the students involved, a summary of the project, and the outcomes in terms of publications and citations.

Interactive Computer Program for the Analysis of Non-prismatic Reinforced Concrete Bridge Girders

Sponsor and Date

Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority, Department of Transportation and Public Works, 1996-1997.

Faculty and Students

- PI – Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

- CoPI – Eduardo Veras-Jorge, PhD, PE

- Student – Eduardo Miranda, undergraduate

Summary and Outcomes

Highly-interactive, graphically-oriented, special purpose Finite Element Analysis program, within MS-Windows environment as the Graphical User Interface (GUI). The system has been developed for PC computers, and Visual Basic has been selected as the programming language, due to its versatility and the advantages of its toolbox to develop applications following the MS-Windows standards.

The application is called NPB program, which can be defined as an interactive computer program for the analysis of Non-Prismatic Beams (or similar structures) by means of plane stress Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The program performs plane stress analysis, using four nodes isoparametric elements (Q4), considering static loads, linear elastic material behavior, and the small displacements theory. It is specifically oriented to non-prismatic beam type models (defined by two vertical boundaries at the most left and the most right limits).

A model analysis may be divided into three implementation phases: a) Pre-processing Stage, where the model data is defined, b) Processing Stage, where the automatic meshing of the model, and the finite element analysis are performed, and c) Post- Processing Stage, where results are consulted. Regarding these phases, the program permits the user, among other features, to:

Pre-Processing Stage:

- Define the solid modeling using lines, parabolas and circle arcs

- Assign different support conditions, including elastic supports

- Assign different loads conditions (concentrated, distributed, self weight) I.4.

- Verify/modify model data presented in tabular form

- Display the identification of solid modeling elements (KeyPoints, Curves) I.6.Perform Zooming options

- Activate/deactivate many visibility options

- Save the solid model (or FEA model) as a bitmap file

- Copy the solid model (or FEA model) as a bitmap to the Clipboard

Processing Stage:

Define the parameters to control the number of divisions for the meshing II.2Perform the automatic meshing of the solid modeling with quadrilateral elements Perform an static linear elastic analysis of the model, using plane stress elements.

Post-Processing Stage:

Review the results file (nodal displacements, element strains and stresses) Future developments will include the graphical post-processing of the results (i.e. deflected shape, stress contours, etc.)

Figure 1: Drawing Toolbar to Generate Solid Model

Figure 1: Drawing Toolbar to Generate Solid Model



Figure 2: Solid Model Generation, with Support and Load Conditions

Figure 2: Solid Model Generation, with Support and Load Conditions



Figure 3: Beam After Automatic Meshing of the Solid Model

Figure 3: Beam After Automatic Meshing of the Solid Model



Figure 4: Partial View of Finite Element Model Element Identification

Figure 4: Partial View of Finite Element Model Element Identification



Publications and Citations

Pacheco G., and Veras E., 1998. Development of an Interactive Finite Element Analysis Program within MS Windows 95 Environment,

- XXV Pan-American Convention of Engineers UPADI 98, Lima, Perú, November 1998.

- Engineering and Land Surveying Congress COINAR 1998, Inter-American University of Puerto Rico, Bayamón Campus, March 1998.

- First Forum for the Promotion of Engineering Research in Puerto Rico (FoPER’98), University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR, February 1998

Pacheco G., and Veras E., 1997. “NPBeam Project Report”, Report submitted to the PR DOT detailing all the research and development process.

Interactive Program for the Analysis of Rigid Pavement Slabs UnderTruck Loads

Sponsor and Date

Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority, Department of Transportation and Public Works, 1997-1998.

Faculty and Students

- PI – Jorge Tito-Izquierdo, PhD, PE

- Co-PI – Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

- Student – Danna Lopez, undergraduate

1.2.3. Summary and Outcomes

Highly-interactive, graphically-oriented, special purpose Finite Element Analysis program, within MS-Windows environment as the Graphical User Interface (GUI). The system has been developed for PC computers, and Visual Basic has been selected as the programming language, due to its versatility and the advantages of its toolbox to develop applications following the MS-Windows standards.

The application is called Visual Slab program, which can be defined as an interactive computer program for the analysis of slabs on grade models, subjected to moving truck loads, and falling weights. The program speed up model generation, performs the automatic meshing (Finite Element Model) of the solid model, and performs static and dynamic (time history) analysis using isoparametric four nodes plate elements, dowels connecting plates, considering non-linear soil behavior, and the small displacements theory.

A model analysis may be divided into three implementation phases: a) Pre-processing Stage, where the model data is defined, b) Processing Stage, where the automatic meshing of the model, and the finite element analysis are performed, and c) Post- Processing Stage, where results are consulted. Figure 5 schematizes this processes, and Figures 6 to 8 show examples of the program capabilities.

Figure 5: Program Stages

Figure 5: Program Stages



Program Window Layout

Program Window Layout

Pavement Slab Model and Initial Truck Location



Post-Processing Example - Plate Stress Contour Plots

Post-Processing Example – Plate Stress Contour Plots



Publications and Citations

Tito J., and Pacheco G., 2000. “Comparison Between Visual-Slab Computer Program and Experimental Results of Minnesota Road Research Project”

- International Steering Committee of the IX Panamerican Conference on Traffic and Transportation Engineering, Gramado, RS, Brasil, November 19-23 2000.

- XI Engineering and Land Surveying Congress COINAR 1999, College of Engineers and Land Surveyors of Puerto Rico, Caribbean University, Bayamón, Puerto Rico

Tito J., and Pacheco G., 1999. “Visual Slab”, Report submitted to the PR DOT detailing all the research and development process.

Professional Development Program UPR/PUPR/ATI

Sponsor and Date

Alternative for Integrated Transportation, Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority, Department of Transportation and Public Works, 2004-2007.

Faculty and Students

- PI – PUPR Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

- CoPI – PUPR Amado Velez-Gallego, MSCE, PE

- PI General -Benjamín Colucci, PhD, PE, (UPR-RUM)

- Students PUPR:

2004-2005

- Adolfo Ayuso-Sáez
- Jorge Echeandia- González
- José A. López-Morales
- Francisco Serrano-Monroig

2005-2006

- Gisselle Márquez-Berríos
- Francisco Serrano-Monroig
- Frances Tatis-Ríos
- Gilberto Vigo-Rodríguez

2006-2007

- Carlos Cambrelén-Santiago
- Carlos Mateo-Ortiz
- Yomaira Morales-Rosario
- Josué Rivera-Reyes
- Javier Santana-Lamouth

2007-2008

- Jorge González-Amaya
- Richard Lizardi-Chapel
- Josué Martínez-Ramos
- Erick Rivera-Hernández
- Carlos Rodríguez-Bury[/p]

Summary and Outcomes

The UPR / PUPR / ATI Professional Development Program, in operation since the summer of 2004, integrates students and faculty from eight disciplines, three campuses, and two universities: the Mayagüez and Río Piedras Campuses of the University of Puerto Rico and the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (PUPR) through the Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority (PRHTA) and the Integrated Transportation Alternative (ATI).

The development program is based on four focal principles: real learning experience, multi-disciplinary approach, applied-research, and leadership development.

The primary objective of the program is to develop local professionals and leaders that are able to plan, design, build, operate, and maintain public transportation systems. The secondary objectives are to:

1. strengthen the education and research in key transportation infrastructure-related disciplines,

2. establish a interdisciplinary cooperative model between engineering, architecture, urban planning, business administration, and social sciences professionals working alongside with government and industry officials, and

3. develop a cooperative relationship among the campuses of UPR Mayagüez, UPR Rio Piedras, the Puerto Rico Polytechnic University, the ATI, PRHTA and the PR-DTOP.

The UPR/PUPR/ATI Professional Development Program exposes students to the SJMA complex transportation environment through an applied research experience that has the following three stages:

1. Formative Stage:

– Introduction to the formal research process.

– Introduction to public transportation and urban planning aspects

– Exposure to current data from government officials and private consultants associated with the SJMA public transportation system, the urban planning process and current developments.

– Experiencing the SJMA public transportation system

– Experiencing public transportation in other environments

Figure 10 Study Trip to Portland, USA

Figure 10 Study Trip to Portland, USA



Study Trip to Chicago, USA

Study Trip to Chicago, USA



2. Research Topic Selection and Proposal Development Stage:

– The students select a research topic

– A formal research proposal is written

– The research topic and proposal is presented orally

3. Research Project Development Stage:

– Students develop the proposed research topic

– The progress of the project development is presented orally

– A final project report is presented in the form of a formal written report, a formal research poster, and a formal oral presentation. Personnel from ATI and other transportation-related government agencies are invited to this activity, together with personnel from the private sector, and the professional community in general.

Student Erick Rivera Presenting his Progress Report

Student Erick Rivera Presenting his Progress Report



Proposed New AMA Station (Tatis and Vigo Final report, 2005)

Proposed New AMA Station (Tatis and Vigo Final report, 2005)



Publications and Citations

Pacheco-Crosetti, G. E., Moreno-Viqueira, G., Figueroa-Medina, A., Gutiérrez, J. (2008). “UPR/PUPR/ATI Professional Development Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Public Transportation and Sustainable Development”, Dimensión, Revista del Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico, Año 22, Vol 1, 2008.

Tatis, F. and Vigo, G. “Intermodal Integration at Bayamón Station”,

- Hispanic in Engineering Conference, San Juan, PR, 2006. They obtain the first place award in the poster session competition.

-COINAR 2007, College of Engineering and Land Surveying of Puerto Rico. They obtain the first place award in the poster session and second place award in the oral presentation competitions.

There are eleven (11) Research Reports, available in the project site: uprati.uprm.edu

Professional Development Program In Transportation Infrastructure Inspection PUPR/ACI

Sponsor and Date

Alternate Concepts Inc (ACI), 2007-present.

1.4.2. Faculty and Students

- PI – PUPR Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

- CoPI – PUPR Amado Velez-Gallego, MSCE, PE

- Faculty Advisors – José Borrageros-Lezama, MSCE, PE

- Students PUPR:

2007-2008

- Carlos Cambrelén-Santiago
- Melvin Díaz-Torres
- Gisselle Márquez-Berríos
- Carlos Mateo-Ortiz
- Frances Tatis-Ríos
- Gilberto Vigo-Rodríguez
- Felix Zurcher (graduate student)

2008-2009

- Glorielisa González-Arrigoitía
- Carlos Mateo-Ortiz
- Carlos J. Rodriguez-Bury
- Josué Rivera-Reyes (graduate student)
- Gilberto Vigo-Rodríguez
- Felix Zurcher (graduate student)

2009-2010

- Carlos Álvarez-Díaz (graduate student)
- Héctor Martínez-Pedraza
- Carlos Otero-Hernandez
- Erick Rivera-Hernandez
- Josué Rivera-Reyes (graduate student)
- Yamayra Rodriguez-Otero

Summary and Outcomes

The Professional Development Program In Transportation Infrastructure Inspection (PDP-TII) is a cooperative agreement between Alternate Concepts Inc (ACI) and Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (PUPR).

The Program has three principal objectives:

- Stimulate the development of engineering students in the area of Transportation Infrastructure Inspection and Maintenance.

- Perform an inspection and maintenance assessment program of the San Juan Railway System (TU) structures and drainage infrastructure.

- Propose possible improvements to the inspection, condition evaluation, and maintenance assessment processes of transportation facilities.

The program consists of five stages:

Formative Stage

Students are trained trough seminars and workshops in several topics

– Fundamentals of Inspection and Monitoring.

– Structural Failures, Damages, and Deterioration.

– Damage and Condition and Rating.

– Types of and Damages in:

–– RC Structures.

–– Steel Structures.

–– Retaining Walls.

–– Earth Slopes.

–– Drainage Infrastructure.

–– Tunnel Facilities.

– Visual Inspection Procedures and Equipment.

Safety.

– TU Infrastructure.

– Condition Assessment and Rating.

– Documentation and Reporting of Findings.

Research and Development Stage

Students have to perform extensive literature review on visual inspection procedures and condition assessment rating around the world, and propose improvements in all the stages of the process:

– Inspection procedures and equipment.

– Inspection forms.

– Infrastructure identification and location.

– Findings documentations.

– Assessment of the field conditions found trough objective and quantitative rating scales.

– Required level of intervention according to obtained rating (i.e. routine maintenance, repair, replacement, among others),to support the establishment of priorities in the maintenance process.

Inspection Stage

The concepts learned in the previous stage are applied to different components of the TU infrastructure.

Example of Damage Found in Sidewalk Parapet

Example of Damage Found in Sidewalk Parapet



Evaluation Stage

The findings of the inspection are evaluated, and a condition rating is assigned (that helps decide the type of maintenance process required to assure adequate safety and operational conditions).

Reporting Stage

A detailed report of the findings and the assigned condition is developed. An evaluation of possible causes to the discovered findings, and recommended intervention are also developed.

Publications and Citations

Rivera, Erik et al, 1.4. “Professional Development Program in Transportation Infrastructure Inspection PUPR/ACI”, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Annual Poster exhibition, June 2010.

More than eighteen (18) inspection reports submitted to ACI.

Dwight Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships Program

Sponsor and Date

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), 2006-present.

Faculty and Students

- PI PUPR – Amado Vélez-Gallego, MSCE, PE (Campus Program Manager)

- CoPI PUPR – Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE (Backup Campus Program Manager)

- Faculty Advisors

José Borrageros-Lezama, MSCE, PE

- Omaira Collazos-Ordoñes, PhD

- Héctor Cruzado-, PhD, PE

- Aluisio Pimenta, PhD, PE

- Students PUPR

2006-2007

- Melvin Díaz-Torres
- Gisselle Márquez-Berríos
- Andrea Merejo-Alejo
- Aileen Valdes-Montijo
- Felix Zurcher (graduate student)

2007-2008

- Franchesca Figueroa-Vélez
- Frances Tatis-Ríos

2008-2009

- Ricardo Acuña
- Verónica de Freitas-Nicholson
- Erick Rivera-Hernández
- Josué Rivera-Reyes (graduate student)

2009-2010

- Ivelisse Alvarado
- Arnaldo Blanco
- Derek Cardona-Abreu
- Flora Colom
- Miguel Ramos

Summary and Outcomes

Publications and Citations

Zurcher, Felix “The Effect of Base Material Permeability on Pavement Performance”, Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington DC, January 2007.

Pinto,Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington DC, January 2008.

Márquez-Berríos, Gisselle and Díaz-Torres, Melvin. “Analysis of Trip Generation Trends in Urban Shopping Centers. Case Study: San Juan Metropolitan Area, Puerto Rico”, COINAR 2007, College of Engineering and Land Surveying of Puerto Rico. They obtain the third place award in the poster session competition

Rivera-Hernández, Erick. “Assessment of the Actual Condition of the San Juan Metropolitan Area from a Smart Growth Point of View”, Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington DC, January 2009.

Research Reports submitted to the FHWA

Faculty Members Specialty and Research Interests

This section presents a capsule for each faculty member, with his/her area of specialty, area/s of sub-specialty and research interests

Professor: Héctor J. Cruzado, PhD, PE

Specialty: Structural Engineering

Sub – Specialty: Wind Engineering, Wind Loadings on Structures

Research and Development Interests:

• Wind Engineering

• Wind Loadings on Structures

Professor: Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

Specialty: Structural Engineering

Sub- Specialty: Geotechnical Engineering, Transportation Engineering

Research and Development Interests:

• Finite Element and advanced modeling of structures

and its foundations

• Static and dynamic soil-structure interaction

• Earthquake Engineering

• Field performance, inspection, and forensic evaluation of structures

and its foundations

• Pile analysis and design

• Interactive engineering software development

• TOD; urban development and transportation, pedestrian comfort.

Professor: Christian A. Villalta Calderón , Ph.D.

Specialty: Civil Engineering

Sub – Specialty: Water Resources and Environmental

Research and Development Interests:

• Hydrology and Hydraulics

• Water quality

• Surface and subsurface transport of contaminants

• Environmental Engineering Treatment and Design (physical, chemical and biological treatment)

• Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

• Watershed Integrated Management

• Bioremediation

• Modeling in hydrology, hydraulics, groundwater.

Faculty Members Research Experience

This section presents a summary of the research experience and publications of each faculty member, in a resume style.

Héctor J. Cruzado

Research and Development Experience

Chair of the 11th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, June 2009. This conference is convened every four years by American Association on Wind Engineering.

Research Assistant / Research Associate, Texas Tech University

– Supervised full‐scale experiments on wind‐induced vibrations of cantilever traffic signal structures.

– Participated in the Texas Tech Hurricane Intercept Team (Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Dennis).

– Participated in the Texas Tech Storm Chasing Team (Summers 2004, 2005, and 2006).

Visiting Researcher, Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory, University of Western Ontario. Designed and tested on the wind tunnel an aeroelastic model of a cantilever traffic signal structure (Fall 2009)

Conference Papers

Gustavo E. Pacheco and Héctor J. Cruzado, “Strategies to Teach Wind Engineering Fundamentals to Undergraduate Students.” 11th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 22‐26, 2009.

Héctor J. Cruzado and Chris Letchford. “Wind tunnel studies of cantilever traffic signal structures.” 12th International Conference on Wind Engineering, Cairns, Australia, July 1‐6, 2007.

Chris Letchford, Héctor J. Cruzado, and Greg Kopp. “Mast arm vibrations of cantilever traffic signal structures.” 7th UK Conference on Wind Engineering, Glasgow, United Kingdom, September 4‐6, 2006.

Kishor Mehta, Chris Letchford, and Héctor J. Cruzado. “Multidisciplinary Doctoral Degree in Wind Science and Engineering.” 9th International Conference on Engineering Education, San Juan, Puerto Rico, July 23‐28, 2006.

Chris Letchford, Héctor J. Cruzado, and Guoqing Huang. “Wind‐induced Oscillations of Cantilevered Traffic Signal Structures.” 10th Americas Conference on Wind Engineering, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, May 31 – June 4, 2005.

Gustavo E. Pacheco-Crosetti, PhD, PE

Research and Development Experience

Research Assistant, “Geometric Design of Two-lane Roadways, Capacity of Two- lane Roadways, and Simulation of the Motion of an Isolated Vehicle”, sponsored by Córdoba State Highway and Transportation Authority (Argentina), National University of Córdoba, 1986-1988.

Research Assistant, “Matrix Analysis of Plane Frame Structures”, sponsored by the Department of Structures, National University of Córdoba, 1987-1988.

Research Assistant, “Analysis and Design of Thin-walled Structures” (Non-linear Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete Thin-walled Beam-shells Considering Material Non-linear Behavior and Concrete Cracking, by means of integration procedures), sponsored by CONICOR (Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Córdoba State, Argentina), National University of Córdoba, 1988-1990.

Research Assistant, MS Thesis, “Synthesis of the Nonlinear Behavior of Multistory Steel Buildings” (Linear and Non-linear Static Analysis of Spatial Steel Frames. Computer and Computer Graphics Applications), University of Puerto Rico – Mayaguez Campus, 1991-1993.

Principal Investigator, “Interactive Computer Program for the Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Girders”, sponsored by Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority, Department of Transportation and Public Works, 1996- 1997.

Co- Principal Investigator, “Development of an Interactive Program for the Analysis of Rigid Pavement Slabs Under Truck Loads”, sponsored by Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority, Department of Transportation and Public Works, 1997-1998.

Researcher, PhD Thesis, “Dynamic Lateral Response of Single Piles Considering Soil Inertia Contribution”, University of Puerto Rico – Mayaguez Campus, 2003- 2007.

Principal Investigator and Coordinator of the Program for the PUPR, “Professional Development Program UPR/PUPR/ATI”, sponsored by Alternative for Integrated Transportation (ATI) – Puerto Rico DOT, 2004-2008.

Backup Campus Manager and Faculty Advisor, “Dwight Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships Program”, sponsored by Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), 2006-present.

Principal Investigator, “Professional Development Program In Transportation Infrastructure Inspection PUPR/ACI”, sponsored by Alternate Concepts Inc. (ACI), 2007 – present.

List of publications:

Pacheco, Gustavo E.; Cruzado, Héctor J. (2009) “Strategies to Teach Wind Engineering Fundamentals to Undergraduate Students”, 11 Americas Conference on Wind Engineering (11ACWE), San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 22-26 2009

Cruzado, Héctor J.; Pacheco, Gustavo E. (2009) “11a Conferencia de las Américas de Ingeniería del Viento, un Orgullo para la Ingeniería de Puerto Rico”, Revista Tecnomundo, Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico.

Pacheco-Crosetti, G. E., Suarez L. (2008) “Dynamic Lateral Response of Single Piles Considering Soil Inertia Contribution”, accepted as an oral presentation in Session 5, Structural engineering, of the 14th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering (14WCEE), Beijing, China, October 12-17 2008

Pacheco-Crosetti, G. E., Moreno-Viqueira, G., Figueroa-Medina, A., Gutiérrez, J. (2008). “UPR/PUPR/ATI Professional Development Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Public Transportation and Sustainable Development”, Dimensión, Revista del Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico, Año 22, Vol 1, 2008.

Pacheco G., Suárez L. y Pando M. (2007). “Modelo Simplificado para el Análisis Dinámico de Pilotes Sometidos a Carga Horizontal”, ENIEF 2007 XVI CONGRESO SOBRE MÉTODOS NUMÉRICOS Y SUS APLICACIONES, Córdoba, Argentina, October 2-5 2007.

Pacheco G. E. (2007). “Dynamic Lateral Response of Single Piles Considering Soil Inertia Contribution”. Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Puerto Rico; May 2007

Pacheco G. and Godoy L. (2006). “Contributions of Porfirio Ballesteros in the Area of Shell Structures”, Latin American and Caribbean Consortium of Engineering Institution (LACCEI) – The Fourth Latin American and Caribbean Conference: Breaking Frontiers and Barriers in Engineering: Education, Research and Practice, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

Tito J., and Pacheco G. (2000). “Comparison Between Visual-Slab Computer Program and Experimental Results of Minnesota Road Research Project”, International Steering Committee of the IX Panamerican Conference on Traffic and Transportation Engineering, Gramado, RS, Brasil, November 19-23 2000.

Tito J., and Pacheco G. (1999). “Comparison Between Visual-Slab Computer Program and Experimental Results of Minnesota Road Research Project” XI Engineering and Land Surveying Congress COINAR 1999, College of Engineers and Land Surveyors of Puerto Rico, Caribeam University, Bayamón, Puerto Rico

Tito J., and Pacheco G. (1998). “Teaching Structures Using Experimental and Analytical Methods”, ASCE 12th Engineering Mechanics Conference, San Diego, California, May 1998

Pacheco G., and Veras E. (1998). “Development of an Interactive Finite Element Analysis Program within MS Windows 95 Environment”, XXV Pan-American Convention of Engineers UPADI 98, Lima, Perú, November 1998.

Pacheco G., and Veras E. (1998). “Development of an Interactive Finite Element Analysis Program within MS Windows 95 Environment”, a) Engineering and Land Surveying Congress COINAR 1998, Inter-American University of Puerto Rico, Bayamón Campus, March 1998. b) First Forum for the Promotion of Engineering Research in Puerto Rico (FoPER’98), University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus, Mayagüez, PR, February 1998

Pacheco G. (1996). “The Stiffness Method Implementation within MathCad Computation Environment”, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico Magazine, vol 6, Dec. 1996, 205-238

Almánzar L., Pacheco G., and Cáceres A. (1994). “UPR-Build User Manual”, Civil Infrastructure Research Center (CIRC), University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, Puerto Rico; August 1994

Pacheco G. E., and Pesquera C. I. (1994). “Synthesis of the Advanced Analysis of Multistory Steel Buildings Within the UPR-Build System”, Proceedings of the Sixth Puerto Rico EPSCoR Annual Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico; May 6-7 1994[/p]

Pacheco G. E. (1994). “Computer-Aided Nonlinear Analysis of Multistory Steel Buildings”, Proceedings of the Seventh Congress of Computer Sciences and their Applications, Ponce, Puerto Rico; April 14-15 1994

 

Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science Department

ECECS Technical Areas

ECECS01


ECECS02


ECECS03


Professor Research Interest Areas

Arturo Geigel, PhD

Research Interest Areas: Speech Processing, Computing Security, Pattern Recognition

- 2011, Ph.D. Computer Science NSE (expected 2012)

- 2009, M.S. Computer Engineering PUPR
- 1997, B.S. Regents College

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 340 Office: M-214
email. ageigel@pupr.edu

Juan F. Torres, PhD

Research Interest Areas: Speech and Audio Processing, Image Processing, Machine Learning

- 2010, Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

- 2006, M.S. Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

- 2002, B.S. Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Columbia University

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 340 Office: M-213
email. jtorres@pupr.edu

Felix Nevarez, PhD

Research Interest Areas: DSP, and Computer Sciences

t. (787) 622-8000
email. fnevarez@pupr.edu

Luis M. Vicente, PhD

Research Interest Areas: Statistical and Adaptive Signal Processing, Beamforming, Array Signal Processing

- 2009, Ph.D. Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Missouri

- 1996, M.S. Electrical Engineering, Florida International University

- 1990, Telecommunication Engineer, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 344 Office: L-308B
email. lvicente@pupr.edu

ECECS Department Facilities

Classrooms

PUPR has state-of-the-art facilities, including classrooms with large screen projectors, computer laboratories, and an educational content delivery system that has the capacity to integrate distance learners into the classroom experience. This institution also uses a Blackboard Enterprise learning system that allows the virtualization of personal assignments, exams, and grading over a secure internet connection.

Laboratories

Data Communication Laboratory and Advanced Network Laboratory

- High Performance Computing Laboratory (HPC)

- Windows to the Caribbean Laboratory

- Turing Laboratory for Graduate Studies

- Information Assurance Wireless Laboratory

- Computer Forensics Investigation Laboratory (CFIL)

- Signal Processing and Communication Laboratory

- Plasma Laboratory[/p]

Contact Information

PO Box 192017
San Juan, PR 00919-2017

Tel. (787) 622-8000 ext. 344 / 340
Fax: (787) 250-8131

Department of Mechanical Engineering

ME Technical Areas



ME01


ME02


ME03


Professor Research Interest Areas

Dr. Carlos Alvarado

Research Interest Areas: Biomechanics, Robotics, Design & Manufacturing, Renewable Energy Systems

- 2005, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut

- 1997, M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University

- 1995, B.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 Office: L-403
email. calvarado@pupr.edu

Dr. Héctor Rodríguez

Research Interest Areas: Dynamics of Rotating Machinery, Structural Dynamics/Vibration

- 2010, M.B.A., University of New Orleans

- 1996, Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech

- 1993, B.S. Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 Office: L-403
email. hrodriguez@pupr.edu

Dr. Bernardo Restrepo

Research Interest Areas: Control, Modelling and Identification, System Dynamics and Integration

- 2011, Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, West Virginia University

- 2000, M.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico

- 1995, B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Corp. Technology of Bolivar

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 Office: L-402
email. brestrepo@pupr.edu

Dr. Julio Noriega

Research Interest Areas: Vibration, Non-destructive Methods and Modal Analysis, Condition Monitoring, Fracture Mechanics and Composite Materials

- 2006, Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, West Virginia University

- 1993, M.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico

- 1984, Post-Grade Geophysics and Geology for Prospecting Hydrocarbons, University of San Carlos, Guatemala

- 1983, B.S. Mechanical Engineering,University of San Carlos, Guatemala

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 Office: L-412
email. jnoriega@pupr.edu

Dr. Antony Skrzypinsky

Research Interest Areas: Tribology and Surface Layer Technology, Design for Manufacturing and Assembly, Tooling Design, Fatigue Strength and Wear of Materials

- 1980, D.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, AGH University, Poland

- 1970, Ph.D. Manufacturing Engineering, AGH University, Poland

- 1961, M.S. Manufacturing Engineering, Polytechnic University, Poland

t. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 Office: L-403
email. askrzypinsky@pupr.edu

ME Department Facilities

Laboratories

- Engineering Materials

- Engineering Measurements

- Fluid Mechanics

- Manufacturing – Conventional and CAM

- Mechatronics

- Thermal Sciences Lab

- Plasma Lab[/p]

- Flight Simulator (coming soon)

Classrooms

- State-of-the-art videoconference room

- Computer-aided engineering lab

- High-performance computer lab

Contact Information

PO Box 192017
San Juan, PR 00919-2017
Tel. (787) 622-8000 ext. 323 / 297
Fax: (787) 771-0011

Plasma Engineering Laboratory

Visit our Plasma Laboratory