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Master of Civil Engineering

Experience and professional practice are essential elements in the formation of an engineer, but an in-depth knowledge of the foundations of the different Civil Engineering (CE) areas, and the development of strong analytical skills based on state of the art knowledge, methodologies, and techniques are also necessary. The CE graduate program seeks to promote advanced studies and research at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. Moreover, it seeks to involve graduate students in this process and to instill in them an intense desire for knowledge.

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Overview

Experience and professional practice are essential elements in the formation of an engineer, but an in-depth knowledge of the foundations of the different Civil Engineering (CE) areas, and the development of strong analytical skills based on state of the art knowledge, methodologies, and techniques are also necessary. The professional experience would complement and strengthen the study through applications, but they cannot substitute the experience acquired through an academic graduate level degree.

The CE graduate program seeks to promote advanced studies and research at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. Moreover, it seeks to involve graduate students in this process and to instill in them an intense desire for knowledge.

Civil engineers are responsible for providing the world‟s infrastructure, which are basic to the existence of modern society. These facilities can be large and complex, thus requiring the civil engineers to be broadly trained and able to deal with the latest technologies. The goals of the Graduate Program in Civil Engineering at PUPR are to provide comprehensive training in the Civil Engineering fields and related areas, to offer instruction in the methods of independent investigation, and to foster the spirit of research. A graduate program is much more than a continuation of undergraduate work; its true spirit is one of inquiry and of promotion of the desire to contribute to human knowledge. Graduate studies should therefore be contemplated only by students who have already demonstrated in their undergraduate programs high intellectual achievement and the power of independent thought and research.

Philosophy

Experience and professional practice are essential elements in the formation of an engineer, but an in-depth knowledge of the foundations of the different Civil Engineering (CE) areas, and the development of strong analytical skills based on state of the art knowledge, methodologies, and techniques are also necessary. The professional experience would complement and strengthen the study through applications, but they cannot substitute the experience acquired through an academic graduate level degree.

The CE graduate program seeks to promote advanced studies and research at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. Moreover, it seeks to involve graduate students in this process and to instill in them an intense desire for knowledge.

Civil engineers are responsible for providing the world‟s infrastructure, which are basic to the existence of modern society. These facilities can be large and complex, thus requiring the civil engineers to be broadly trained and able to deal with the latest technologies. The goals of the Graduate Program in Civil Engineering at PUPR are to provide comprehensive training in the Civil Engineering fields and related areas, to offer instruction in the methods of independent investigation, and to foster the spirit of research. A graduate program is much more than a continuation of undergraduate work; its true spirit is one of inquiry and of promotion of the desire to contribute to human knowledge. Graduate studies should therefore be contemplated only by students who have already demonstrated in their undergraduate programs high intellectual achievement and the power of independent thought and research.

Graduate Profile

CE graduates should be able to keep abreast of the latest developments in their areas, read and analyze journal papers from their field, conduct independent research in their area (Thesis Option), develop engineering solutions of the common problems in their area of study (Master Project Option), write papers or technical reports, conduct technical and scientific presentations within a conference environment, and use mainstream engineering software applications.

Admission Requirements

Students with undergraduate preparation in Civil or Environmental Engineering programs are encouraged to apply for admission. Applicants must have completed a bachelors degree at an accredited university with a minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.75/4.00.

Degree Offered

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers graduate instruction leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Civil Engineering (M.S.C.E.) and Master of Engineering in Civil Engineering (M.E.C.E.).

Students may pursue their master degree according to two program alternatives. The first one conducts to the Master of Science degree, and the second one, to the Master of Engineering degree. To either one of the degrees, the student must complete the following requirements:

Alternative 1: Master of Science Degree – Thesis Requirement

· Approve a minimum of 24 credit-hours in graduate courses (Level 6000) in the major area. Two of the courses must be GMP 6510 – Research Methodology and a mathematical oriented course as recommended by the Civil Engineering Graduate Program Coordinator.

· Approve a minimum of 6 credit-hours in graduate courses (Level 6000) out of the major area.

· A maximum of 6 credit-hours advanced under-graduate courses (Level 5000) can be used to replace graduate courses (Level 6000) as recommended by the Civil Engineering Graduate Program Director.

· Carry out a research program as specified in his/her program of study and prepare a thesis. The thesis consists of 6 credit-hours. Pass an oral exam (defense) on the thesis subject.

Alternative 2: Master of Engineering Degree – Master Project Requirement

· Approve a minimum of 27 credit-hours, in graduate courses (Level 6000) in the major area. One of the courses must be a mathematical oriented course as recommended by the Civil Engineering Graduate Program Director.

· Approve a minimum of 6 credit-hours in graduate courses (Level 6000) out of the major area.

· A maximum of 6 credit-hours advanced under-graduate courses (Level 5000) can be used to replace graduate courses (Level 6000) as recommended by the Civil Engineering Graduate Program Director.

· Carry out a special project as specified in his/her program of study and prepare the project report. The project consists of 3 credit-hours. Give an oral presentation on the master project.

Curricular Sequence

Students must selected one of the four available Major Areas: (1) Geotechnical Engineering, (2) Water Resources and Water Treatment, (3) Structural Engineering, and (4) Construction Engineering. The total number of credits in Major Area courses varies depending on the degree and option selected. For the Master of Science degree, student must take a minimum of 18 credit-hours in their Major Area. For the Master of Engineering degree, student must take a minimum of 24 credit-hours in their Major Area.

> Civil Engineering Flowchart

Faculty

  • Alsaadi, Balhan Altayeb – Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain, 1988; M.S.C.E. and B.S.C.E., Trian Vuia Polytechnic Institute, Timisoara, Romania, 1984.
  • Coll Borgo, Manuel – Lecturer II, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2001; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus; 1994; P.E.
  • Collazos Ordóñez, Omaira – Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Missouri – Columbia, 2003; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993; B.S.C.E., University of Cauca, Colombia , 1989.
  • Cruzado Vélez, Héctor J. – Professor; Civil and Environmental Engineering and Surveying Department Head; Ph.D. in Wind Science and Engineering, Texas Tech University, 2007; M.S.C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1998; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1996; P.E.
  • Cuevas Miranda, David – Lecturer II, Ph.D. in Geological Oceanography, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2010; M.S. in Geology, Saint Louis University, 2003; B.S. in Geology, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1998.
  • Delgado Loperena, Dharma – Professor, Ph.D. in Human Environmental Sciences, University of Missouri – Columbia, 2004; M. Arch., University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 1983; B.A. in Environmental Design, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 1981.
  • Deschapelles Duque, Bernardo – Professor; Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, California Western University, 1983; M.S.C.E., California Western University, 1981; B.S.C.E., University of Havana, Cuba, 1954; B.S.Ch.E., University of Havana, Cuba, 1952; P.E.
  • Elías Rivera, Johnny – Professor, LL.M., Catholic University of Puerto Rico, 1983; J.D., University of Puerto Rico,1974; Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of California, 1964; B.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1959, P.E.
  • González Miranda, Carlos J. – Professor; Dean, School of Engineering, Surveying and Geospatial Science; Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering, North Carolina State University, 1995; M.M.S.E., North Carolina State University, 1990; B.S.I.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1987.
  • Guzmán De La Cruz, Alberto – Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1998; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1994; B.S.C.E., Institute of Technology of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic , 1990; P.E.
  • Molina Bass, Omar I. – Lecturer I, Ph.D., Construction Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, 2008; D.E.A., Construction Engineering, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, 2006; M.Eng., Construction Engineering & Management, University of Alberta, Canada, 2000; B.S.C.E., Magna Cum Laude, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1998.
  • Mueses Pérez, Auristela – Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of South Florida, 2006; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1992; B.S.C.E., Technological Institute of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 1987; P.E.
  • Pabón González, Miriam – Professor; Dean, Graduate School; Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, 2001; M.E.M., Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1995; B.S.I.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1990; P.E.
  • Pacheco-Crosetti, Gustavo – Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2007; M.S. in Finite Element Method, UNED, Spain, 1996; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 1993; B.S.C.E. and M.S.C.E., National University of Córdoba, Argentina, 1988; P.E.
  • Torres Rivera, Reinaldo – Associate Professor, M.Arch., University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 1987; B. in Environmental Design, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 1983.
  • Villalta Calderón, Christian A. – Assistant Professor, Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2009; M.S.C.E., University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, 2004; B.S.C.E. University of Costa Rica, 2001.

Contact Information

Martha Dumois, Ph.D.
Graduate Program Director
Email: mdumois@pupr.edu
Phone: 787-622-8000 x. 686

Assessment

Exit Interview

Course Description

 

CE 6100 – Soil Shear Strength

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

The Mohr Circle, failure theories and stress paths. Behavior of saturated sands during drained and undrained shear. Liquefaction and cyclic mobility. Stress-deformation and strength characteristics of saturated cohesive soils. Use of triaxial testing and stress paths in engineering practice.

 

CE 6110 – Earth Retaining Structures

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Retaining Structures. Stability of retaining walls. Waterfront structures. Sheet piling wall analysis and design. Wales and tie rods. Deadman capacity. Methods for reducing lateral pressure. Relieving platforms. Energy, absorbing capacity of dolphins. Design of braced cofferdams. Lateral pressure and stability.

 

CE 6114 – Shallow Foundations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Shallow foundations. Ultimate bearing capacity theories under centric vertical, inclined, and eccentric loads. Special cases of shallow foundations. Settlement and allowable bearing capacity. Dynamic bearing capacity and settlement. Shallow foundations on reinforced soil. Uplift capacity of shallow foundations.

 

CE 6120 – Deep Foundations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Characteristics and capabilities of deep foundations. Sheet pile walls on sandy and clayey soils. Estimation of pile length. Load transfer mechanism. Estimation of pile capacity. Settlement of piles. Pullout resistance. Pile driving formulas. Group capacity and elastic settlement. Negative skin friction. Drilled-Pier and Caisson foundations.

 

CE 6140 – Slope Stability

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Subsoil exploration and sampling for slope stability. Shear strength for slope stability analysis. Factor of safety. Procedures for computations, Ordinary, Bishop, Jambu and Spencer methods. Water pressures and unit weight. Short and long-term conditions. Pseudo-static analysis. Common problems in computer analysis. Back analysis of slope failures. Computer applications. Slope stabilization and monitoring program.

 

CE 6150 – Seepage and Drainage

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Permeability. Seepage principles. Flow nets. Quick conditions. Filter and drain design. Geosynthetics applications. Seepage control in earth dams and levees. Cutoff walls. Foundation dewatering and drainage. Slope stabilization with drainage. Instrumentation.

 

CE 6174 – Finite Element Methods for Geotechnical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Review of Theory of Elasticity. Variational Principles. Domain discretization. Displacement approximation. Shape functions and generalized coordinates approach. Finite Element Stiffness Matrix. Isoparametric elements. Consistent load vector. Bar elements applied to pile analysis. Plane strain elements applied to slope and earth gravity dam analysis. Plate elements applied to analysis of mats on elastic foundations. Commercial packages. Advanced topics in geotechnical computational mechanics.

CE 6210 – Probability and Statistics in Water Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Probability and statistical principles applied to the solution of hydrologic problems. Application of probability distributions to the rainfall and runoff process. Field analysis using random distributions and functions. Determination of confidence intervals and hypothesis. Analysis of annual and partial hydrologic time series.

 

CE 6230 – Groundwater Hydrology

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Description of the occurrence of groundwater and its relation to the hydrologic cycle. Study of the mechanics of flow in a porous media, groundwater movement and well hydraulics. Quality and pollution of groundwater. Saline water intrusion. Groundwater management and artificial recharge.

 

CE 6240 – Urban Drainage

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week

Studies of storm water management in urban areas emphasizing storm drainage systems associated with transportation facilities and urbanized watersheds. Basic topics: a) Surface drainage systems design parameters and regulations, b) Flow in gutters, c) Drainage inlet and median channels analysis, d) Detention and retention storage facilities analysis.

CE 6250 – Advanced Hydrologic and Hydraulic Modeling

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Methods of modeling hydrologic and hydraulic systems are examined. Basic topics: a) Particular models, b) Model selection, c) Model calibration procedures, d) Model application to real cases.

 

CE 6260 – Analysis and Restoration of Fluvial Systems

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

This is a practical course, which describes the characteristics, management and restoration of fluvial systems and their associated estuary and wetland habitats. It provides an integrated overview of the morphology, ecology, hydrology, hydraulics and sediment dynamics of both artificial and natural channels and their associated floodplains. Tools are presented to observe, sample, and interpret basic problems that affect fluvial systems, and to define and analyze restoration alternatives.

 

CE 6270 – Sedimentation Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Sediment transport Analysis and management in the fluvial environment. A practical course on the characteristics and management of fluvial sediments including: sediment characteristics, origin and transport of sediments, sampling and measurements of both coarse and fine sediment, initiation of motion, channel hydraulics and stability, numerical and physical modeling concepts, design of fixed and live bed channels. Includes practical applications in the area of reservoir design and management, bridge scour, intake design, and streambank erosion and design of naturalized channels.

 

CE 6280 – Reservoir Analysis and Design

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Physical characteristics of reservoirs: yield, capacity, reliability, sedimentation. Types of reservoirs. Forces on dams, gravity dams, arch dams, earth dams. Failure, safety and rehabilitation of dams. Spillways, gates and outlet structures.

 

CE 6300 – Structural Engineering Laboratory

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Experimental determination, and correlation with theoretical predictions of behavior of basic structures under static and dynamic loading conditions. Tests include tension, compression, fatigue, and strain gauge measurements.

 

CE 6305 – Simulation Engineering Laboratory

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

The development of numerical structural system models. Applications of software system to design and analysis. Interactive design techniques of optimal design and structural element configuration. Experimental stress analysis using computer tools.

CE 6315 – Analysis of Plates and Shells

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Bending of flat plates. General theory. Folded plates. Slab action and beam behavior. Shear flow at plate intersections. Membrane stresses and displacement of shells of revolution. Bending stresses in circular domes. Synclastic surfaces. Cylindrical shells. Antiplastic surfaces. Hyperbolic paraboloid shells. Edge geometry and support conditions. Prestressing in plates and shells.

 

CE 6320 – Advanced Strength of Materials

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Theories of stress and strain, linear stress-strain. Temperature relations, inelastic material behavior, nonsymmetrical bending of straight beams, torsion, beams oil elastic foundations. Applications to cylindrical shells. Two-dimensional theory of elasticity. Matrix formulation.

 

CE 6325 – Principles of Structural Stability

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Integration of the neutral equilibrium differential equation in columns. Energy method. Principle of stationary total potential energy. Second order strains. Stress stiffness matrix in flexural members. Eigenvalue problem. Buckling of trusses and frames. Computer program. Torsional and torsional-flexural buckling of beams. Stress stiffness matrix plate elements. Local buckling. Inelastic effects.

 

CE 6330 – Advanced Topics in Structural Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Advanced matrix analysis methods. Applications to bar-element structures, with particular emphasis on the stiffness method application, computer implementation, and the usage of spreadsheets and analysis packages.

 

CE 6335 – Advanced Foundations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

The applications of the principles of soil mechanics to the design of foundations. Subsurface investigation. Design of footings, retaining walls, pile foundations, flexible retaining structures, anchor tie-backs, bridge piers, abutments, dewatering system, and underpinning. Case studies.

 

CE 6340 – Advanced Bridge Design

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Introduction to modern highway bridges. Design of concrete, steel and timber superstructures. Design of bridge substructure, including: piers, abutments and bearings. Bridge seismic analyses. Introduction to bridge inspection and maintenance.

 

CE 6345 – Design of Reinforced Masonry Structures

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Design of Masonry building structures using working stress and ultimate strength. Design methods. Lateral load distribution to shear walls. Design of shear and bearing masonry walls subjected to lateral and gravity load conditions. Quality control and construction of masonry structures. Reinforced masonry, system behavior state analysis.

 

CE 6350 – Dynamics of Structures

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Analysis and design of structures under time-dependent loads. Response of elastic damped and undamped structural systems. Vibration analysis for single and multiple lumped mass systems and continuous systems. Lagrange’s equation. Design for earthquake and impact loadings.

 

CE 6355 – Advanced Earthquake Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Earthquake characteristics and hazard. Overview of earthquake resistant design. Behavior of buildings. Design of moment resisting frames, walls, dual system, diaphragms. Design of foundation structures. Safety evaluation and strengthening of existing structures.

 

CE 6357 – Wind Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Introduction to Wind Engineering. Prediction of design wind speed and structural safety. Strong wind characteristics and turbulence. Basic bluff-body aerodynamics. Resonant dynamic response and effective static load distribution. Internal pressures. Laboratory simulation of strong winds and wind loads. Wind tunnel experiments. Wind loads in low-rise buildings, tall buildings, bridges and other types of structures.

 

CE 6360 – Bridge Inspection, Rehabilitation, Repair and Management

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Overview of the bridge engineering process: from the origins of bridge project through its design and the eventual maintenance and rehabilitation of a structure.

 

CE 6370 – Finite Element Methods in Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Generation of finite element stiffness matrix. Shape functions and generalized coordinates approach. Consistent load vector and thermal effects. Programming techniques. Plane elasticity. Isoparametric elements. Assumed stress hybrid approach. Rectangular, triangular and quadrilateral elements. Conforming and non-conforming plate bending elements. Stiffness matrix contribution of elastic foundation. Displacement constraints. Lagrange multipliers. Development of computer programs.

 

CE 6378 – Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Advanced analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures. Short and slender columns and beam-columns. Torsion, shear in short elements. Bearing and shear walls. Two-way floor systems. Composite structures.

 

CE 6380 – Non Linear Behavior of Concrete Structures

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Geometrically non-linear and mechanically non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete elements. The moment-curvature responses and relationships. Mechanics fracture of concrete elements.

 

CE 6385 – Advanced Steel Design

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Behavior of elements subjected to tensile, bending, and compression forces. Design of connections. Design of plate-girders.

 

CE 6395 – Nonlinear Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Nonlinear stress-displacement relationship at soil-structure interface. Discussion of differences between granular and cohesive soils. Refined beam-column with five (5) degrees of freedom to allow distributed load between nodes. Element stiffness matrix and geometric non-linearity expressed by corresponding stability matrix. Analytical procedure to take into account the non-linear soil response by means of a corrective force vector. Discussion of computer software for calculation of ultimate pile lateral load capacity considering non-linear soil behavior and second order effects. Studies of bridge pile bent subjected to large lateral forces caused by extreme ground motion during earthquakes.

 

CE 6410 – Water And Wastewater Treatment Applications

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Development of sampling programs and experimental procedures to evaluate untreated water sources, and the treatment performance of potable water and wastewater unit processes. The results can be used to improve the operation and maintenance of existing facilities and the design of new facilities with confidence based on field data.

 

CE 6420 – Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Soils

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Engineering principles applied to the study of contamination and remediation of soils. Basic topics: a) Characteristics of soils, b) Origin and nature of soil contamination, c) Fate and Transport of contaminants in the subsoil, d) Remediation of soil contamination.

 

CE 6430 – Remediation in Contaminated Subsurface Environments

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Remediation engineering: design and applications to emphasize the engineering aspects of using remediation process for the treatment of contaminated soils, sludge, and groundwater.

 

CE 6440 – Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes of Water and Wastewater

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Physical and chemical characteristics of water and wastewater. Analysis of the theory and applications of physical and chemical processes to the treatment of water and wastewater: screening, sedimentation, thickening, dissolved air flotation, coagulation, chemical precipitation, mixing, flocculation, filtration, electrodialysis and pressure membranes, adsorption, aeration, absorption and stripping, water softening, water stabilization, ion exchange, and disinfection. Design criteria and evaluation techniques for these processes. Chemical requirements and sludge production calculations.

CE 6450 – Biological Wastewater Treatment Processes

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Fundamentals of biochemical operations for wastewater treatment. Modeling of ideal suspended growth reactors. Techniques for evaluating kinetic and stoichiometric parameters. Design and evaluation of suspended growth processes: activated sludge, biological nutrient removal processes, aerobic digestion, anaerobic processes, and lagoons. Modeling of ideal attached growth reactors. Biofilm modeling. Design and evaluation of attached growth processes: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, and submerged attached growth bioreactors.

 

CE 6460 – Water Quality Control and Management

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Study of the water quality control framework, based on the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Safe Water Drinking Act (SDWA). Basic topics: a) Clean Water Act b) Safe Drinking Water Act, c) Detection and Monitoring, d) Treatment and Quality Control.

 

CE 6512 – Value Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Fundamentals of value engineering Project Budgeting. Budgeting techniques. Cost control. Cost models. Planning for value engineering. Human factor. Case studies.

 

CE 6520 – Construction Contracting and Procurement

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Project delivery methods. Contract participants and roles. Contract forms and clauses. Contract documents interpretation and modifications. Construction Contract Administration. Alternative Dispute Resolution.

CE 6530 – Schedule Impact Analysis

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Scheduling specifications. Time Impact Analysis Techniques. Construction delay claims. Damages quantification. Schedule claims preparation/presentation/defense.

 

CE 6532 – Construction Cost Control

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Construction financial management. Accounting for construction financial resources. Managing costs and profits. Managing cash flows. Managing assets and debt. Financial decisions.

 

CE 6540 – Construction Equipment Administration

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Construction Equipment Management. Organizational Structures for EM. Economics / Operation / Mechanics of Construction Equipment Systems. Performance and Productivity Measures. Automation in Equipment Management (EM).

CE 6542 – Construction Material Management

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Material Management Systems. Total Material Costs. Materials requirements planning. Total Quality Management. lust-in-Time concept. Vendor evaluation. Purchasing. Expediting. Field control. Automation in Material Management.

CE 6544 – Hazardous Material Management

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

This course covers the safety, health and transportation regulations of hazardous materials according to Federal and Local Agencies Regulations, such as: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Department of Transportation (DOT).

CE 6550 – Construction Inspections

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Fundamentals of engineering construction inspections. Specifications writing. Contracts. Qualifications & requirements. Inspections procedures. Roles, duties and allocations of responsibilities. Project coordination. Project location. Standards and codes. Guidelines for inspectors. Field inspections. Structural inspections. Geotechnical inspections.

 

CE 6560 – Construction Safety Planning & Regulations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Fundamentals of safety in construction industry. Construction accidents. Safety plan development. Safety management during construction project. OSHA regulations and compliance. Jobsite assessment. Safety record keeping. Safety meetings. Subcontractors.

 

CE 6570 – Modern Construction Materials

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

This course discusses the production, properties, and performance of modern construction materials and their application on special construction environments.

 

CE 6580 -Temporary Structures in Construction

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Fundamentals of temporary structures in construction industry. Technical, business, and legal aspects to build and maintain different temporary support and access structures. Erection and earthwork equipment. Dewatering. Underground support. Construction ramps, runways and platforms. Concrete formwork. False work. Protection of site.

 

CE 6585 – Site Planning and Design

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

Introduction to the process of site analysis, environmental issues, building laws and regulations related to land development. Geographical, topographical, climatic, and ecological issues are approached to complement the understanding of site analysis and design. Surveying, grading, water spply systems, stormwater and sanitary sewer systems design principles are issues to be presented.

 

CE 6901 – Master’s Thesis Dissertation

Six credit-hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

Experimental and/or theoretical research to be presented in thesis for degree requirements.

 

CE 6902 – Extension of Master’s Thesis Dissertation

Zero credit-hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

Extension to complete the experimental and/or theoretical research to be presented in thesis for degree requirements.

 

CE 6905 – Master’s Project, “Final Project”

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

Development of a design project covering all relevant aspects and using advanced analysis and design techniques.

 

CE 6906 – Extension of Master’s Project, “Final Project”

Zero credit-hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

Extension to complete the development of a design project covering all relevant aspects, and using advanced structural analysis and design techniques.

 

CE 6999 – Special Topics in Civil Engineering

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

Special topics in any areas of civil engineering.

 

GMP 6010 – Professional Writing and Presentations

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: None. One four-hour session per week.

This course is designed to provide graduate students with the most relevant concepts governing effective business writing, oral, and nonverbal communication. This course presents the steps required for developing an effective presentation. Students will strengthen their presentation skills through a series of presentations required as part of the course.

 

GMP 6050 – Professional Internship through COOP Program

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: 12 credits approved and Program Director’s Approval. One four-hour session per week.

A planned, work experience in which the student is employed in a job directly related to the student’s academic program. The student is assigned a Faculty Advisor as well as a Supervisor in the place of employment. A work agreement is established between the student, the Supervisor and the Faculty Advisor at the beginning of the term. Both the Faculty Advisor and the Supervisor will monitor the progress of the student.

 

GMP 6510 – Research Methodology

Three credit-hours. Prerequisite: 18 credits approved. One four-hour session per week.

This course provides students the tools required to conduct original research in the areas of engineering, technology, and related fields, including, but not limiting to, problem statement, objectives development, literature review, and determination of the methodology.