Industrial Engineering
  • Undergraduate Program
  • Program Description
  • The curriculum is designed to develop industrial engineers (IE‘s) capable of planning, designing, implementing, and managing integrated production and service delivery systems that assure performance, reliability, maintainability, schedule adherence and cost control. The systems may be socio technical in nature and integrate people, information, materials, equipment, processes, and energy throughout the life cycle of the product, service, or program.

    Industrial Engineering adopts as its goals: profitability, effectiveness, efficiency, adaptability, responsiveness, quality, and the continuous improvement of products and services throughout their life cycles. The humanities and social sciences, computer sciences, basic sciences, management sciences, along with physical, behavioral, mathematical, statistical, organizational and ethical concepts will be used to achieve these ends.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Degree Offered
  • The Industrial Engineering Department offers undergraduate instruction leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (BSIE).

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Career Opportunities
  • Manufacturing and service companies in both the private and public sectors seek Industrial Engineering graduates for their skills and competencies. In addition to the manufacturing industries such as pharmaceutical, electronics, medical devices and assembly-processes companies, which traditionally hire IE’s; other employers of our graduates include banks, hospitals, logistics-distribution firms, retailers, and consulting firms. Practicing industrial engineers serve as transition and integration consultants as well as developers and system architects in the design for producibility and usability of products and services. Industrial engineers, in senior positions, are sought as strategic planners and integrators because of their grasp of comprehensive and complex systems. IE’s lead and manage engineering, manufacturing, service delivery, research and entrepreneurial firms, always searching for and fostering continuous change and improvement. In short, IE’s are called upon to help assure profits, total quality control, cost effectiveness, timeliness, and satisfactory results for customers and strategic impact through continuous improvement and innovation initiatives. Industrial Engineers are particularly sensitive to promoting human values of health, safety and satisfaction. The typical career path is an entry-level engineering or line supervision position that progresses to a management position in the firm or institution. Often, Industrial engineers ultimately become chief executive officers of their organizations.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Mission
  • To provide our graduates with the knowledge and skills in Industrial Engineering necessary to hold professional positions in industry and government, to pursue graduate studies and life-long learning, and to contribute with the development of the community and the society.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Objectives
  • Within a few years of graduation, PUPR BSIE program graduates are expected to attain the following:

    • Make smart, innovative and responsible decisions that contribute to the improvement of their organizations’ overall goals and objectives.
    • Become competent leaders of their profession and role models of their communities.
    • Acquire new knowledge and expertise to stay current in industrial engineering and other fields of studies.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Outcomes
  • Upon graduation PUPR BSIE program graduates will be able to demonstrate the following program outcomes:

    • a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
    • b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
    • c) An ability to design production or service systems, components or processes to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.
    • d) An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
    • e) An ability to identify, formulate and solve industrial engineering problems.
    • f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
    • g) An ability to communicate effectively.
    • h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of industrial engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
    • i) A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
    • j) A knowledge of contemporary issues.
    • k) An ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Curriculumn
  • Enrollment


  • ACADEMIC YEAR ENROLLMENT
    2011-2012 298
    2012-2013 286
    2013-2014 271
  • Graduation Data


  • ACADEMIC YEAR DEGREES AWARDED
    2010-2011 24
    2011-2012 58
    2012-2013 27
  • Undergraduate Program
  • Graduation Requirements
  • In order to earn the degree, the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

    • 24 Credit-hours in Mathematics
    • 16 Credit-hours in Basic Science
    • 24 Credit-hours in Socio-Humanistic Studies and Languages
    • 32 Credit-hours in General Engineering
    • 64 Credit-hours in Industrial Engineering
    • 3 Credit-hours in IE Technical Electives
    • 3 Credit-hours in Free Electives
    • 166 Total Credit-Hours

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Course Description
  • IE 1000 – INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: MATH 1330
    This course offers students an overview of Industrial Engineering including major areas of study, techniques and software. A hands-on approach using case studies and lab exercises is used to present IE concepts and techniques.

    IE 1611- COMPUTER TOOLS FOR IE’S LAB I
    One (1) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 1110
    Introduction to the use of computer software commonly used by industrial engineers in their day to day work. Key discussions on technology literacy and technological competence. Focus on data and process analysis using Minitab and Excel to be able to improve probability and statistics data analysis as well as process performance capabilities.

    IE 2110- FINANCIAL AND COST ACCOUNTING
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 1611, SOHU 2040
    Introduction to Financial and Cost Accounting. Introduction to double entry accounting. Development of the cost of goods sold statement, preparation of an activity based costing analysis. Preparation of an annual budget from production to include projected balance statement. Financial ratios. Relationships between activities, costs of resources, objectives and purposes. Use of cost-volume-profit (CVP) analysis as a planning and decision making aid.

    IE 2210- PROBABILITY FOR ENGINEERS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: MATH 1350
    Co-requisite: IE 1611
    Introduction to descriptive statistics. Principles of probability theory. Random variables and functions. Expected value and variance of a random variable. Discrete and continuous probability distributions.

    IE 2220- STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: IE 1611, IE 2210
    This course introduces the student to the basic concepts on statistics and its application to the solution of engineering problems. The hypothesis testing, correlation and simpler linear regression concepts will be essential on the analysis of integrated systems, processes or components.

    ENGI 2260 - ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: MATH 1350
    Introduction to economic evaluation of investments for engineering projects. Life cycle costing. Depreciation and income tax determination. Replacement analysis. Evaluation of public projects.

    ENGI 2270- ENGINEERING PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: MATH 1350
    This course introduces the student to the basic concepts on probability and statistics and its application to the solution of engineering problems. Principles of probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distribution, hypothesis testing, correlation and simpler linear regression concepts will be essential to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

    IE 2310- WORK DESIGN & HUMANS FACTORS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2210, ENGI 2110
    A comprehensive study of the Human Factors Engineering emphasizing the systems approach to workplace and machine design. Emphasis is placed on optimizing the Human-Machine System interface by learning about the human musculoskeletal and cognitive capabilities and limitations. Topics covered include work physiology, human information processing, workstation design, biomechanics, displays and controls, human visual and auditory systems, and metal workload assessment.

    IE 2311- WORK DESIGN & HUMANS FACTORS LABORATORY
    One (1) credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week or equivalent.
    Co-requisite: IE 2310
    A hands-on experience in Work Design and Human Factors Engineering. Emphasis is on in-depth practices of the main tools obtained in the Work Design and Human Factors course, in real workplaces and/or scenarios. The laboratory will cover anthropometry, workstation design, manual material handling, illumination and noise studies.

    IE 2611- COMPUTER TOOLS FOR IE’S LAB II
    One (1) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 1611
    Introduction to the use of computer software commonly used by industrial engineers in their day to day work. Including spreadsheets-presentation software, Database management (MS Access) and Computer Aided Drawing using Sketchup.

    IE 3222 - STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: IE 2220
    Fundamental concepts of Six Sigma and Lean. A comprehensive discussion of the major aspects of using statistical methodology for quality control and improvement and waste elimination. In-depth discussions of the DMAIC methodology discussing the details of the Define and the Measure tools related to statistical process Control, including the 7 tools for SPC, process capability analysis, measurement system analysis and introduction to acceptance sampling plans.

    IE 3360- JOB DESIGN & WORK MEASUREMENT
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: IE 2310, ENGI 2260
    Co-requisite: IE 3222
    Introduction to principles and techniques for analysis, design and measurements of work methods. Emphasizes in motion and time study. Among the topics covered are operation analysis, learning curve methodology, line balancing, worker and machine relationship, and work measurement techniques such as stopwatch, predetermined time, standard data and work sampling.

    IE 3361- JOB DESIGN & WORK MEASUREMENT LABORATORY
    One (1) credit-hour. One four-hour Laboratory period per week or equivalent.
    Pre-requisite: IE 2311
    Co-requisite: IE 3360
    Laboratory practices in analysis, design and measurements of work methods. Emphasis is placed on an in-depth practice of the main tools obtained in Job Design and Work Measurement course. The laboratories will cover practices related to stopwatch, performance factors, allowance factors, learning curve and predetermined time. A hands-on project to provide experience in the manufacturing industry implementing Stopwatch, MTM and Work Sampling techniques.

    IE 3410 - MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND INVENTORY CONTROL
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2110, IE 2220
    Introduction to inventory management and systems. Analytical methods for control and maintenance of inventory, emphasizing in mathematical models such as deterministic models for independent and discrete demand, and probabilistic models for independent demand, considering the safety stock and service level systems. Introduction to Materials Requirement Planning for inventory systems with dependent demand.

    IE 3422- OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODELS I
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hours lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2210, MATH 2360
    Deterministic and probabilistic models in Operations Research. Includes the use of linear programming techniques for modeling and solving linear problems. Mathematical algorithms are Simplex and the Dual, transportation, and assignment. Computer software is used to perform sensitivity analysis for LP problems. Probabilistic models include birth and death processes and queuing theory.

    IE 3500 SERVICE ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hours lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2611, IE 3222
    The course will provide to the student the profile of the operation processes of several service industries. This profile will be used as a framework to develop operational improvement alternatives directed to enhance service delivery. Service operational management concepts will be presented combined with analytical tools to develop optimal solutions for process constraints.

    IE 3510- PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 3360, IE 3410
    Analysis of Production System and interaction with Organizational Structures. Includes quantitative methods for forecasting, planning, capacity analysis, line balancing, production scheduling and distribution strategies. Introduction to manufacturing philosophies such as Just in Time and Theory of Constraints.

    IE 3522- OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODELS II
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2220, IE 3422
    Markov Chain concepts, Simulation principles and decision making under uncertainty. Use of animated simulation to evaluate the performance of different hypothetical manufacturing and service operations. Case studies to identify operational problems develop and test “what if scenarios”.

    IE 3530- INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2310, IE 2311
    This course offers a conceptual framework for the study, understanding, and application of human behavior in organizations from the viewpoints of an industrial engineer. Discussion of historical and behavioral science research methodology. Examines interrelation of personality, perception, attitudes and job satisfaction. Focus is on the importance of motivation, group dynamics, and leadership and modern organization design.

    IE 3710- INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURING PROCESSES
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: ENGI 3510
    Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing Technologies. Includes basic principles of selecting component materials, value-added processes, testing techniques and systems. An introduction to Computer Numerical Controlled Machines.

    IE 4212 LEAN SIX SIGMA
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2611, IE 3222
    The LSS course carefully develops hypotheses about lean thinking and process experimentation to drive value-added thinking. LSS continues to build upon the DMAIC methodology to understand key problem solving advancement phases and tools that enable, apply and target projects for variability and cost reduction while increasing customer satisfaction and the overall experience.

    IE 4560- PROJECT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: ENGI 2260, IE 2210
    Role of project manager. Techniques for project selection, planning and control. Principles and methods for project budgeting and monitoring. Resource allocation analysis. Use of project management software (MS Project 2010).

    IE 4910- FACILITIES PLANNING AND DESIGN
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: IE 3361, IE 3422, IE 3510
    Understand and be able to develop a detailed-24-step execution plan using a systematic approach to facilities planning and design. Understand the relationship between facilities planning and the lean thinking way of doing things. Understand the flow analysis techniques and apply them to different situations to assess facilities performance metrics and be able to develop measurable alternatives and recommendations. Apply the different sources of information required to build a plant layout and apply the layout cost function based on the flow x distance criteria.

    IE 4915- FACILITIES PLANNING AND DESIGN PROJECT
    One (1) credit-hour. By arrangement
    Pre-requisite: IE 4910
    Understand and be able to apply a detailed-24-step execution plan using a systematic approach to facilities planning and design. Be able to simplify a visual thinking to the systematic approach by using a “A3 method-brown paper canvas” to display required data to assess, evaluate and generate alternatives for the layout problem at hand. Be able to define the layout design problem by acquiring key customer and stakeholders’ information and organizing the data into clear and actionable goals with specific performance metrics.

    IE 4960- INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE
    Three (3) credit-hours. By arrangement.
    Pre-requisite: IE3360,IE 3361, IE 3222
    The student will participate in a real life work experience in a manufacturing or service facility during the entire academic term. Through this professional practice, the student should apply the theory and practice of an Industrial Engineer working in a real life project or projects and to significantly impact the wellbeing of the organization. The student will attend the facility as a regular employee and under the supervision of an Industrial Engineer or an organizational manager.

    IE 4990- CAPSTONE DESIGN COURSE
    Three (3) credit-hours. By arrangement
    Pre-requisite: IE 4212, IE 4910 and Department Head Approval
    Co- requisites: IE 4915
    Students will be initiating a systematic design process in order to solve an industrial engineering real life problem at a company. Students will work on industry projects that are evaluated academically by the instructor and professionally by a company-assigned technical point-of-contact. The emphasis of this course is on the identification of, solutions to, recommendations for, and presentations to management using the DMAIC methodology. The Define, Measure and Analyze phases of a project are expected to be completed by the end of the term. Teams will integrate knowledge gained from previous courses and will take into consideration appropriate engineering standards and multiple design constraints.

    IE 4995- CAPSTONE DESIGN COURSE EXTENSION
    Three (3) credit-hours. By arrangement
    Pre-requisite: IE 4990
    Students will be completing a systematic design process in order to solve an industrial engineering real life problem at a company. Students will work on industry projects that are evaluated academically by the instructor and professionally by a company-assigned technical point-of-contact. The emphasis of this course is on the identification of, solutions to, recommendations for, and presentations to management using the DMAIC methodology. The Improve and Control phases are expected to be completed by the end of the term. Teams will integrate knowledge gained from previous courses and will take into consideration appropriate engineering standards and multiple design constraints.

    IE 5222 DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 2220
    Introduction to the application of Design of Experiments by using statistical tools such as Multiple Regression, Analysis of Residual, Analysis of Variance, Random Block and Factorial designs. A project and a computer software are used to evaluate experiment designs and their results.

    IE 5224 QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 3500
    This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to analyze a different quality system program: ISO 9001, 13485 and the FDA's Quality System regulation: 21 CFR 820 and 21 CFR 210-211. How the requirements impact the day-to-day operations of organizations in any industry. Students learn by participating in group exercises and in-depth discussions.

    IE 5228 LEAN SERVICING
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: IE 3500
    Lean services are the application of the lean thinking movement to service operations. Lean principles of Continuous Improvement and Respect for People have been successfully applied to all kinds of service settlings, including healthcare, tourism and the public sector. Conceptually, these implementations follow very similar routes to those in manufacturing settings, and use the same tools and techniques such as 5S and visual management, standard work and A3 forms for rapid improvement events organization. The Special Topics class will be centered in developing skills to be able to transform traditional service settlings in “lean service settlings”. We will use the “Lean Solution” book from Womack and lately, a book on healthcare named On the Mend. We will follow a case-study environment and practical discussions of case studies from the American Society of Quality and from the Lean Institute.

    IE 5990- SPECIAL TOPICS
    Three (3) credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisite: Upon IE Department Head recommendation
    Open course to include topics of special interest and actuality in the manufacturing and service environment.

  • Undergraduate Program
  • Capstone Projects
  • under construction
  • Undergraduate Program
  • Research
  • under construction

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