Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science Department
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Mission

    To prepare students with a holistic formation in mathematics, science, computation fundamentals, computers, ethical and legal aspects of computing, languages, design and analysis of algorithms, interface design, database systems and software engineering, capable of joining the workforce as computer scientists and/or pursuing graduate studies.

  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Program Educational Objectives

    Graduates from the Computer Science Program will be able to:



    • Be innovators able to apply a multiple-viewpoint understanding of an application domain for the creation of integrated and usable solutions.
    • Develop successfully as team members, leaders, and managers or entrepreneurs, with the proper communication skills and ethical standards to excel as computer science professionals.
    • Be able to develop a business as a computer consultant and/or a provider of computer services and solutions within industrial and governmental organizations.
    • Engage in the lifelong learning of the theoretical and practical areas of computer science in order to keep up with the rapid technological changes and innovation, and/or pursue graduate studies.
    • Apply Computer Science knowledge to other disciplines.

  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Program Description
  • The field of computer science is one of the most popular academic disciplines within our information society. Computer Scientists build computer-aided design tools, manage information technology enterprises, develop business information systems for various industries, including finance and healthcare, support wide-area, local, and cellular networks, and design embedded computer-controlled products.

    The computer science program is a flexible program that can be tailored to the student’s interests and adjusted to the rapid changes in the industry. The computer science curriculum was designed to satisfy the following criteria:

    • University general education requirements
    • A common core of computer science courses to ensure a good level of understanding of computer science.
    • A breadth requirement to provide the students with a broad knowledge of the computer science field.
    • A depth requirement to ensure that the students have substantial competence in a concentration area
    • A senior project experience under the supervision of a faculty member
    • Elective courses to permit further breadth/depth customization of the student’s program
    • ABET accreditation requirements
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Degree Offered
  • Bachelor of Sciences in Computer Science (BSCS) degree
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Mission
  • LINK WHERE?
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Objective
  • LINK WHERE?
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Student Outcomes
  • Computer Science Graduates must have:

    • a. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and science as required to solve Computer Science projects
    • b. Ability to analyze and interpret data and compare results with requirements
    • c. Ability to analyze, design and implement a system, or a component, following user specifications
    • d. Ability to work in teams
    • e. Ability to identify, analyze and solve Computer Science problems
    • f. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
    • g. Ability to communicate effectively
    • h. Broad education necessary to understand the impact of Computer Science solutions in a global/societal context
    • i. Knowledge of contemporary issues in Computer Science and related areas
    • j. Recognition of a need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning
    • k. Ability to use techniques, skills, and modern tools necessary for the Computer Science practice
    • l. Exposed to several programming languages, be able to develop applications with at least one of them and have the fundamental knowledge to adapt quickly to any new high level programming language
    • m. Knowledge of discrete mathematics, differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, linear algebra and numerical analysis
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Graduation Requirements

  • Bachelor of Sciences in Computer Science (BSCS) degree
    MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
    • 61 Credit-hours in Computer Science Core
    • 12 Credit-hours in Computer Science Electives
    • 15 Credit-hours in Mathematics
    • 12 Credit-hours in Basic Science
    • 18 Credit-hours in Socio Humanistic and Languages Studies
    • 9 Credit-hours in Free Electives
    • 3 Credit-hours in Engineering Sciences
    • 6 Credit-hours in Management
    136 Total Credit-Hours
  • Computer Science : Undergraduate Program
  • Course Descriptions
  • ECECS DEPARTMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSES



    EE 1130 Freshman Design for Electrical & Computer Engineers

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: MATH 1350
    An introduction to the engineering design philosophy, techniques, methodology, and graphical tools, with emphasis on teamwork. The course seeks to develop creativity and imagination skills in the solution of engineering problems, including critical thinking and logical presentation of an engineering analysis.



    EE 2000 Circuit Analysis I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: SCIE 1441, MATH 1370
    For EE & CpE Students Only: CECS 2202
    For ME Students Only: ME 2010
    Co-requisites: MATH 2350
    Elements in a circuit and electrical quantities.  Techniques for the DC circuit analysis.  Natural and forced response of RL, RC, and RLC circuits.  Introduction to AC circuits analysis.



    EE 2001 Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2270, EE 2000
    Modern electronics measurement methods. Instrument calibration and use. Experimental verification of fundamental laws of electric circuits and magnetism. Experimental study of capacitive and inductive circuits. Use computer programs to analyze circuits. Safety consideration in the laboratory.



    EE 2010 Computational Methods in Electrical & Computer Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2202,EE 2000
    Co-requisites: EE 2020. Must register in EE 2020 in the same term or have it approved.
    Introduces and motivates some of the most important and time-tested methods and techniques for obtaining solutions to mathematical formulations by using numerical approaches amenable to their automation in the form of computer algorithms, while taking into consideration the issues resulting from the finite precision representation of numbers and limited memory available within computer systems. Main topics included are: “Gaussian Elimination, Linear Equations, Orthogonal Projections, Least-Squares & Eigenvalue Problems, and Applied Numerical Analysis. Approximations and Errors. Numerical Solution of Linear and Nonlinear Algebraic Equations, ODE, PDE, Numerical solution of RC, RL, and RLC Circuits. “Curve‑Fitting”.



    EE 2020 Circuit Analysis II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2000
    Sinusoidal steady state analysis.  AC circuit power calculation.  Three phase circuits.  Coupled inductors and transformers.  Laplace transform in circuit analysis.  Resonance and frequency response in a circuit Transfer function and passive filters.



    EE 2030 Electromagnetics Theory

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2000
    Study of time-varying electric and magnetic fields and Maxwell’s equations describing time-varying fields.  Use of Maxwell’s equations to describe the propagation of electromagnetic plane waves.  Reflection and transmission of waves at discontinues boundaries.



    EE 2400 Electromechanical Energy Conversion I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2000, EE 2030
    Co-requisites: EE 2020
    The study of the transformers, rotating machinery basics and DC machines under steady state. Safety considerations with the electric machines



    EE 2401 Electromechanical Energy Conversion I
    Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2001, EE 2400
    Experimental study of electrical machines.  Safety considerations with electric machines.  This course is designed to give electrical engineering students a one trimester course in laboratory work on:  electrical and mechanical measurements and basic operation characteristics of transformers (single and three phases) and DC machines used as motor and as generators.



    EE 2410 Electromechanical Energy Conversion II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2400
    The study of the three phase transformers and one phase/three phase ac induction motor.



    EE 2411 Electromechanical Energy Conversion II  Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2401, EE 2410
    Experimental study of induction (single and three phase), universal and synchronous motors.  Safety considerations with electric machines.  This course is designed to give electrical engineering students a one-trimester course in laboratory work on: electrical and mechanical measurements and basic operation characteristics of AC machines (single and three phase).



    EE 2500 Electronics I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 1130, EE 2000
    Co-requisites: EE 2001
    This course is the first of a three-course series in electronics. Subjects include operational amplifiers, semiconductor devices, diodes, rectification, bipolar transistors, amplification, switching, and an introduction to field-effect transistors. Design and analysis techniques are presented for each subject.



    EE 3002 Signals & Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2010, EE 2020
    Continuous and discrete-time signals.  Continuous-time system representation.  Fourier series.  Fourier transform.  Z-transform. Discrete-time system representation.  State-variable analysis.



    EE 3220 Software Applications for Electrical Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2202
    Basic knowledge of various engineering software applications that have proven to be very intensively used in the industry and academic environments.  Introduction to Microsoft Office, MATLAB, SIMULINK, MathCAD and Pspice Family Design Center.



    EE 3420 Power System Analysis I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2400
    Co-requisites: EE 2410
    The study of the power concepts in a process of generation, transmission and distribution of an electric system.



    EE 3440 Electric System Design I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2020, EE 2400
    General Design of electrical systems based in the National Electrical Code and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority Code.



    EE 3520 Electronics II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2020, EE 2500
    This is the second course in a three-course series in electronics. More advanced topics of semiconductor devices are introduced. Discussion topics include differential amplifiers, multistage amplifiers, frequency response, and design and analysis of other common amplifier configurations using MOSFETs and bipolar transistors and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs).



    EE 3521 Electronics Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2001, EE 3520
    Review of laboratory measurement equipment. Perform several design experiments according with topics on electronic theory: diodes and power supplies. Behavior of BJT as amplifier, timers, OP-amp and some design applications; MOSFET as an amplifier.



    EE 3600 Automatic Controls

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3520, EE 3002
    Study of linear control systems.  Transfer functions.  Stability criteria.  Compensation techniques.  Analysis of a particular system and determination of an optimal design complying with given specifications.  A design project will be required.



    EE 3610 Automation Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 2300, COE 2301
    Co-requisites: EE 3611
    Study of the theory and practices of the technologies used for industrial automation.  The PLC is used as the main micro-controller device to interface with sensors, relays, electro-pneumatics, and motors. Different problems and situations are presented to the students and they prepare and design the solution.  A final project is presented at the end of the class.



    EE 3611 Automation Engineering Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 2300, COE 2301
    Co-requisites: EE 3610
    Experimental exercises with sub-systems used on industrial
    control applications.  The PLC is used as the main micro-controller. Design and programming of PLC based systems are performed.  A field trip to the industry is made as part of the laboratory.



    EE 3700 Communication & Wireless Systems I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2270, EE 2030, EE 3002
    Analysis and Transmission of Signals.  Amplitude modulation (AM) and Angle modulation (FM, PM). Introduction to Random Processes Concepts.  Introduction to Wireless Systems. Propagation Characteristic of Wireless Channels. Fading.



    EE 3710 Random Processes

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2270, EE 3002
    After completing this course the students should master the theoretical principles regarding Probability and Random Processes and be familiar with some of its basic applications to electrical engineering.  Topics include Probability, Random Variables, Operations in Single and Multiple Random Variables, Random Processes, Spectral Characteristics of Random Processes, Linear System with Random Inputs.



    EE 4002 Capstone Design Course I

    Three credit-hours.  Two two-hour meetings per week.
    Pre-requisites: Departmental Permit. Must have approved all Basic Electrical Engineering Core courses plus ENGI 2260, plus  15 credits of EE Department Technical Electives.
    First part of a two-term course on the design of projects based on open-ended requirements.  Projects will be selected in accordance with the student's area of interest (i.e., Electric Power, Electronics, Communications, Automatic Controls, etc.).  Students must approve both Capstone Design Courses in sequence and without interruptions.  Students that approve the first course and miss the second course will be required to repeat the first course again.



    EE 4022 Capstone Design Course II

    Three credit-hours.  Two two-hour meetings per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4002
    Second part of a two-term course on the design of projects based on open-ended requirements.  Students must approve both Capstone Design Courses in sequence and without interruptions.  Students that approve the first course and miss the second course will be required to repeat the first course again.



    EE 4400 Power System Analysis II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3420
    Co-requisites: EE 2411, EE 4401
    Review of impedance and admittance matrix construction and reduction.  Review of transformer line and machine models suitable for short circuit and steady state analysis.  Power flow analysis using the Gauss Seidel method.  Case studies of power flow analysis.  Short circuit analysis of three phase, single phase and phase to phase faults.  Breaker selection.



    EE 4401 Power System Analysis Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3420
    Co-requisites: EE 4400
    Experiments with electric power transmission systems, three phase generation, power lines, and synchronous motors.



    EE 4422 Electric Power Quality

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2410, EE 4400
    Measurements and Industry Standards for Power Quality. Component modeling and network analysis under non-sinusoidal conditions. Effects of nonlinear loads. Harmonics and flicker distortion in power systems. Sags, swells, impulses and other transient events. Improvement practices.



    EE 4432 Power System Protection

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4400
    Introduction and general philosophies of protection for power systems.  Analysis of power system during faults and abnormal conditions.  Application of protective relays in electric power systems.  Study of protection schemes for Transmission and Distribution lines, Substations, Transformers and Generators.



    EE 4433 Power System Protection Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4432
    Experimental works with protective relays and auxiliary equipment.  Calibration, testing and setting of protective relays.  Discussions topics include transient effects in power system networks, short circuit analysis using symmetrical components, instruments transformer PT’s and CT’s test, moderates protective relaying coordination studies, overcurrent relays, directional overcurrent relays, bus and transformer differential relays test and simulation.  Protection and control drawing interpretation containing ANSI and IEEE guides and standard.



    EE 4436 Distribution System Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4400
    Distribution System Planning.  Load Characteristics.  Distribution Transformers.  Substation Components.  Design of Primary and Secondary Systems.  Voltage drop and Power loss considerations. Capacitors Applications.  Voltage Regulation.



    EE 4444  Electric System Design II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3420, EE 3440
    General Design of electrical systems based in the National Electrical Code and the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority Code.



    EE 4450  Wind Power Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2260, ENGI 2910, EE 1130, EE 3440
    Co-requisites: EE 3420
    Study of the wind properties for its conversion into a useful form of energy.  Wind measurement using the International Standard Atmosphere Model (ISA) in wind.  Operation and design of electrical generation systems using wind power systems.  Consideration of standard methods to estimate the wind Annual Energy Output (AEO).  Treatment of the power quality and safety regulations, according with the National Electrical Code, Small Wind Electric System, Article 694.  Wind power component configuration analysis in stand-alone application. Wind power component configuration analysis in grid tie & net metering application.



    EE 4460  Photovoltaic Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2260, EE 3440, EE 3520
    Co-requisites:  EE 3420
    Operation and design of electrical generation systems using photovoltaic (PV) solar panels.  Study of the codes rules, standards, and calculations that apply to these systems, as well as the procedures required to obtain the necessary approvals of the government agencies for the designs.  Considerations in how to incorporate a PV System into a stand-alone or grid connected way.  Other concerns like throw site evaluation, energy evaluation, component operation, system design and sizing, and installation requirements are treated.



    EE 4462 Electrical Construction Project Management

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4444
    Principles of Project Management applied to case studies of the Electrical Construction Industry, and conforming with NECA, MCAA, & SMAGNA techniques.



    EE 4464 Generation Control Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4400
    Power Plant components. Generating Plants Types.  Characteristics of power generating units.  Economic dispatch of  thermal units and methods of solution.  Unit Commitment.  Automatic Generation Control.  Introduction to Power System Stability.



    EE 4502 Power Electronics

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3600 
    Co-requisites: EE 4503
    Electrical rating and characteristics of power semiconductor switching devices.  Phase controlled rectifiers.  Fundamental switching regulators.  DC choppers.  Static power inverters.  Load considerations.  Design projects will be required.



    EE 4503 Power Electronics Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3521  
    Co-requisites: EE 4502
    Experiments with the Power Electronics Converters: AC-DC, DC-DC, and DC-AC.  Closed-loop control of DC drives and Closed-loop control of induction motors. Use of computer programs to analyze circuits. Safety consideration in the laboratory.



    EE 4520 Advanced Electronics

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3520
    Advanced theory, design, and simulation techniques for linear, analog integrated circuit building blocks. Topics include feedback, output stages, power amplifiers, and a thorough analysis of the 741 operational amplifiers.



    EE 4602 Process Control & Instrumentation

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 3440, EE 3600
    Study of process control strategies.  Electronic and pneumatic instrumentation.  Linearization of nonlinear continuous systems.  Application of linear control theory to nonlinear continuous process.  Study of a particular process and determination of the necessary instrumentation and control strategy to be used.  Study of ladder logic networks and its implementation with PLC controllers.  Design projects will be required.



    EE 4603 Process Control & Instrumentation Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Prerequisites: EE 4602
    Experiments for process control and instrumentation.  Transducers, transmitters, analog and digital controllers, controls valves, switches, and indicators.  Experiments with a process control trainer and programmable logic controllers.



    EE 4612 Control System Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3600
    Principles of analog and digital control.  Analog and digital control using the PID controller.  Design strategies with time specifications. Design strategies with frequency specifications.  Special topics.  Design projects will be required.



    EE 4620 Robotic Engineering Design

    Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3600, EE 3610
    Co-requisites: EE 4621
    Study of the technology, programming, applications, theory and practices of robotic systems.  All the basic systems of the robots are covered including manipulators, hardware components, sensors and programming.  The course covers design, and applications.



    EE 4621 Robotic Engineering Design Laboratory

    Zero credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3600, EE 3611
    Co-requisites: EE 4620
    Experimental exercises with sub-systems used in robotic applications.  Design and programming of PLC based systems are performed.  A field trip to the industry is made as part of the laboratory.



    EE 4630 Selected Topics in Control

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2010, EE 3600
    Introduction to the use of soft computing techniques like fuzzy logic, neural networks (NN) and genetic algorithms (GA) for control systems design.  State-space representation of dynamic systems.  Discretization of continuous-time state-space. Controllability and Observability.  Pole-placement and estimator design techniques.  Use of the MATLAB Fuzzy Logic, Neural Networks and Control System toolboxes.  Additional topics may be included.



    EE 4706 Fiber Optics Systems Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2030. Departmental Permit with 107 credits.
    Application of electromagnetic and optical physics theory, digital communication theory, and modulation techniques to the design of fiber optic transmission systems.  A design project is required.



    EE 4712  Introduction to Microwaves and Satellite Communications Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3700
    This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of microwave and satellite communication systems including the study of satellite transponders, earth stations and satellite networks. Analog and digital modulation schemes, as well as antennas and microwave components are studied at a block system level. A final project or report is required.



    EE 4716 Communication & Wireless Systems II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 3700
    Introduction to Random Processes and review of the Sampling Theorem. Pulse amplitude modulation. Baseband digital transmission with PCM, DPCM, DM, ADM. Line coding. Passband binary digital transmission including ASK, FSK, PSK, and DPSK. M-ary modulation techniques. Advanced digital communication systems including spread spectrum systems and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. Overview of the Behavior of digital communication systems in presence of AWGN. Cells and Cellular Traffic. Large scale path loss models.



    EE 4718 Communication Systems, Simulation & Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4716
    Students in this class consider simulation and design of analog and digital communications systems.  Design procedure includes  two  parts 1) theoretical design, and 2) modeling of the designed system by  simulation.  It is used MATLAB, SIMULINK, the COMMUNICATION and the DSP block-sets to verify and test the designed models. The simulating models help to apply theory to practice. The students  simulate  the various models of the analog and digital communication systems like DSB-SC AM, DSB-AM, SSB-AM inside the Amplitude modulations schemes, Frequency and Phase modulations, Binary and M-ary baseband and passband modulations, Time division and frequency division multiple access.



    EE 4720 Digital Signal Processing

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2270, EE 3002
    Topics include LSI systems, the DTFT, the DFT, and the FFT. Study of linear and cyclic convolution. The Z-transform. Filter structures. Introduction to FIR and IIR digital filter design. Several DSP applications are discussed and demonstrated. MATLAB simulations and a final project are required.

    EE 4722 Real Time Digital Signal Processing

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4720, COE 3320
    This course provides theoretical and hands on experience regarding the implementation of DSP algorithms in fixed point or floating point DSP Processors and FPGAs. Includes the implementation of digital filters (FIR and IIR) for real time processing of audio signals.



    EE 4730 Radio Frequency Circuit Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2030, EE 3520
    Co-requisites: EE 3700
    Introduction to high-frequency analog circuit design.  This course provides a solid background for continued studies of wireless communications. Topics include RF concepts, lumped component models, transmission line fundamentals, the Smith Chart and its applications, resonant circuits and filters and small signal amplifiers with s-parameters.



    EE 4740 Communication & Wireless Systems III

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 4716
    Co-requisites: EE 3710
    Behavior of analog and digital communication systems in presence of AWGN. Performance of various modulation / demodulation schemes in fading channels. Review of Propagation Models, Fading. Fading Mitigation. Modems for Wireless Communication. Multiple-Access Techniques in Wireless Communications.



    EE 4902 Undergraduate Research in Electrical Engineering

    Three credit-hours Pre-requisites: Fourth-year Electrical Engineering student with 3.00 or higher GPA. Departmental Permit.
    Research study in advanced topics in areas of electrical engineering like electric power systems, solid state electronics, communication systems, industrial control, robotics, digital signal processing, among others.  The research can be conducted in two ways: a research paper or the implementation of a project.  Each project will be evaluated observing the use of the recommended guidelines required to develop the project.



    EE 4990 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

    Three credit-hours.  One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: Departmental permit according to topics to be addressed.
    Advanced topics (4th year level) in areas of current research in electrical engineering. Many include topics in advanced electric power systems, solid-state electronics, communication systems, industrial control, and robotics, among others.



    COMPUTER ENGINEERING COURSES



    COE 2300 Logic Circuits

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2202, EE 2500
    Co-requisites: COE 2301
    This course covers a full range of topics such as number systems and codes, digital circuits, Boolean algebra, minimization of logic functions, combinational logic design and practices, introduction to combinational logic design with PLDs, sequential logic design principles and practices.  A general exposure to the combinational design of an Arithmetic-Logic Unit (ALU) and the sequential design with PLDs. ROM and RAM system-level design is given.  Design Projects will be required.



    COE 2301 Logic Circuits Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: EE 2001
    Co-requisites: COE 2300
    This laboratory provides an experimental study using the TTL digital logic circuits.  Two levels of integration are used: small-scale integration (SSI) and medium-scale integration (MSI).  These logic circuits are then used in such applications like: combinational logic analysis and design, multiplexing, decoding, arithmetic and comparison operations, memory devices, counting, and sequential logic analysis and design.  Computer simulation will also be required.



    COE 3302 Digital Systems Design with VHDL

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 2300
    Study of the modern methodology for digital system design using CAD tools and VHDL/Verilog as design
    language.  Design of components toward integration into a system to be used for particular purposes.



    COE 3320 Microprocessors

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3200 or COE 2300
    Co-requisites: COE 3321
    This course covers a full range of topics such as: numerical base, basic computer architecture and organization, microprocessor and microcontroller architecture, programmer models, microprocessor addressing modes, instruction set, and assembly language.  A design project will be required.



    COE 3321 Microprocessors Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3200 or COE 2301
    Co-requisites:  COE 3320
    The laboratory provides an introduction to microprocessor systems programming, including both hardware interfacing and software fundamentals.



    COE 4002 Capstone Design Course I

    Three credit-hours.  Two two-hour meetings per week.
    Pre-requisites: All Computer Engineering core courses. Senior standing. Departmental permit.
    First part of a two-term course on the design of projects based on open-ended requirements.  Projects will be selected in accordance with the student's area of interest (i.e., digital circuits, VLSI testing, software engineering, parallel processing, computer graphics, visualization, artificial intelligence, data base, HCI, computer Hardware, computer Software, data mining, etc.).  Students must approve both Capstone Design Courses in sequence and without interruptions.  Students that approve the first course and miss the second course will be required to repeat the first course again.



    COE 4022 Capstone Design Course II

    Three credit-hours.  Two two-hour meetings per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 4002
    Second part of a two-term course on the design of projects based on open-ended requirements.  Students must approve both Capstone Design Courses in sequence and without interruptions.  Students that approve the first course and miss the second course will be required to repeat the first course again.



    COE 4320 Computer Architecture

    Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 3320
    Co-requisites: COE 4321
    Instruction set architecture, functional organization, and implementation of a computer are studied from the performance point of view, to provide the students with the principles and techniques used in the design of modern computer systems.



    COE 4321 Computer Architecture Laboratory

    Zero credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: COE 4320
    A practical experience on design, organization, performance measurement, benchmarks, and implementation
    of a computer system.



    COE 4330 Computer Networks

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3302
    Co-requisites: COE 4331
    Focuses on the ISO-layers above the Data link layer.  Problems solved by each layer are discussed and the entities, techniques and protocols used as solutions are presented and discussed in detail.  Algorithms for routing, spanning tree, and others are presented.  Techniques for improving flow control, their impact on performance, and criteria for their adoption are discussed.  IP addressing schemes and address translation between addressing levels are discussed. The course closes with the discussion of various application-level protocols; file transfer, network management and others.



    COE 4331 Computer Networks Laboratory

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3302
    Co-requisites: COE 4330
    The laboratory exemplifies the techniques and devices that implement the solutions to communication problems discussed in class. Covers structured wiring schemes and their combination with wireless access schemes. Configures communication protocol stacks within various operating systems. Simulation and analysis of techniques that solve important communication problems.  Covers various communication applications and issues of security and reliability related to different network topologies and configurations.



    COE 4340 Microcomputer Interfacing

    Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: COE 3320
    Co-requisites: COE 4341
    Practical architectural view of microprocessor and detailed description of its interfacing elements.  Laboratory assignments place emphasis on the MC68HC12 and MC9S12DP256B microcontrollers, their I/O capabilities; peripheral interfacing chips for memory and devices, and counter-timers and interrupts.  Interrupts and interrupt handlers are discussed in detail.  Weekly interfacing problems and a design project are required.



    COE 4341 Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory

    Zero credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Co-requisites: COE 4340
    The laboratory emphasizes in the I/O capabilities, peripheral interfacing chips for memory and devices, counter-timers and interrupts.  Interrupts are discussed in detail.  Weekly interfacing problems are discussed.  A design project is required.



    COE 4902 Undergraduate Research in Computer
    Engineering

    Three credit-hours
    Pre-requisites: Fourth-year Computer Engineering student with 3.00 or higher GPA. Departmental Permit.
    Research study in advanced topics in areas of computer engineering like data communication systems, digital testing, digital signal processing, artificial intelligence, computer security, distributed systems, and parallel computation, among others.  The research can be conducted in two ways: a research paper or the implementation of a project.  Each project will be evaluated by observing the use of the recommended guidelines required to develop the project.



    COE 4990 Special Topics in Computer Engineering

    Three credit-hours.  One four-hour or two two-hour lecture periods per week.
    Pre-requisites: Departmental permit according to topics to be addressed.
    Advanced topics (4th year level) in areas of current research in computer engineering. Many include topics in data communication systems, computer graphics, robotics, computer architecture, digital testing, image processing, parallel computing, software engineering, computer languages, and real-time systems, among others.



    COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES



    CECS 2004 Discrete Structures

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: MATH 1360
    Fundamental mathematical concepts related to computer science, including finite and finite sets, relations, functions, and prepositional logic. Introduction to other proofing techniques. Modeling and solving problems in computer science. Introduction to permutations, combination graphs, and trees with applications.



    CECS 2200 Computer Programming Fundamentals

    One credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: MATH 1350
    Introductory laboratory teaching the concept of an algorithm as a systematic solution to a problem.  Students learn to represent algorithms using flowcharts and pseudocode.  Fundamental constructs of structured programming languages such as variables, operators, selection, and repetition statements are then used to capture these algorithms for automated execution in a computer.  Students learn to use a development environment and a high level language such as C++.



    CECS 2202 Computer Programming I

    Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Prerequisites: MATH 1350, CECS 2200
    Co-requisites: CECS 2203
    The course is a follow-up to the CECS 2200 course and continues with the development of algorithms and programming skills using C++.  It emphasizes modular program design using functions, arrays, and pointers.  The course introduces fundamental object-oriented concepts such as class, object, instance variables, instance methods, and constructors and destructors.



    CECS 2203 Computer Programming I Laboratory

    Zero credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: CECS 2202
    This course is the Laboratory companion to the Computer Programming I course (CECS2202).  It uses two different pedagogic strategies to assure that student carry out their lab projects successfully.  The students complete a set of mini-projects in a closed laboratory setting. Each set of mini-projects provides them with the practical skills required to tackle a major project as a take home open-lab assignment.  All projects are carried out using an Integrated Development Environment for the C++ language.



    CECS 2222 Computer Programming II

    Four credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Prerequisites: MATH 1360, CECS 2202
    Co-requisites: CECS 2223
    This course continues the development of the students’ skills in algorithm programming using the object oriented paradigm.  It emphasizes dynamic memory allocation, composition, inheritance, templates, exception handling, and file processing.



    CECS 2223 Computer Programming II Laboratory

    Zero credit-hour. One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: CECS 2222
    This course is the Laboratory companion to the Computer Programming II course (CECS 2222).  The students complete a set of mini-projects in a closed laboratory setting.  Each set of mini-projects provides them with the practical skills required to tackle a major project as a take home open-lab assignment.  All projects are carried out using an Integrated Development Environment for the C++ language.



    CECS 3200 Assembly Language Programming

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2202, CS 2302 or COE 2300
    This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of machine language. Basic concepts such as number or data representation (binary, hexadecimal and others), branching and looping, memory organization, operands, instruction cycle, addressing modes, exception handling, etc. are introduced.



    CECS 3202 Visual-Oriented Programming

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2202
    This course is an introduction to Visual Basic. Course covers the fundamentals of visual programming in Visual Basic. Topics discussed cover: variables and operators, using decision structures, loops and timers, strings, modules, procedures, arrays, and graphical user interfaces.



    CECS 3210 Advanced Programming

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
    This course aims to advance your basic programming skills, with special attention to user interface design, problem solving, and coding style in an object-oriented event-driven language, such as C#.  Topics include:  objects, classes and events, GUI design, and multithreading.  Optional topics are: graphics and databases.



    CECS 3212 Data Structures

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
    The course covers fundamental data structures, the tradeoffs these imply for various sorting and searching algorithms, and their application using C++ or similar high-level language.  The course emphasizes recursion, and the use of pointers, lists, stacks, queues, tables, and trees.  The computational performance of searching and sorting techniques using big-O notation are also discussed.  Several programs are assigned.



    CECS 3214 Internet Programming I

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
    Covers the fundamental concepts guiding the emergence of the Internet and WWW.  Focuses on technologies used at the browser’s side. Includes, XHTML, advanced elements such as tables, forms and frames, use of JavaScript for DOM manipulation.  Emphasizes efficiency and scalability in the creation and maintenance of websites, including style sheets (CSS) and separation of content from presentation.  An introduction to XML and related standards is included.



    CECS 3220 Human-Computer Interaction

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
    The course explores user-centered design approaches in information system applications. Addresses the user interface and software design strategies, user experience levels, interaction styles, usability engineering and collaborative systems technology.



    CECS 3234 UNIX Operating System

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
       Concepts of the UNIX operating system are presented. The course will also provide a deep and thorough knowledge of UNIX and its utilities.  Topics include system commands, system editors, awk, sed, text formatting, and shell programming. The use of modem and terminal software and system maintenance utilities are covered as well as system call in C, lex, yacc, ar, and make.



    CECS 3302 Data Communications

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Prerequisites: CS 3300 or COE 2300
    This course is concerned with the exchange of data between directly connected devices. The key aspects of transmission, interfacing, link control, and error-free data transfers are examined. The physical and data link layers are discussed for a variety of LAN and WAN technologies. Design projects are required.



    CECS 4200 Programming Languages

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    The course covers general concepts and constructs of several major programming paradigms.  The design issues involved in the various language constructs are discussed and how these choices lead to different languages.  Imperative, declarative, logic, functional, and object-oriented programming paradigms are illustrated in languages such as Pascal, Prolog, Lisp and C++.  Methods used for describing the semantics and syntaxes of programming languages are introduced, such as: EBNF, syntax graphs, attribute grammars, operational, and denotation semantics.



    CECS 4202 Database Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222
    This course is an introduction to the database concept.  The course covers data models, relational database concepts, hierarchies, relational algebra and SQL, storage structures, and the role of databases and computers in application environments.  Various programming assignments in SQL and a design project are required.



    CECS 4204 Software Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.

    Pre-requisites: CECS 4202
    Familiarity with Windows or Unix applications, and knowledge of advanced object oriented programming is required. An entire software development cycle is executed on a small scale project. The Object Oriented analysis, design, coding, and testing techniques using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are discussed in detail. Tools to support Software Engineering methods for Project Planning, Software Configuration Management, and OOD are demonstrated and used by the students to create sample Software Engineering work products. Some of these Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools include MS Project, WinCVS, Visual Source Safe, Visual Studio .NET.



    CECS 4206 Design and Analysis of Algorithms

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    This course covers issues that arise in the analysis and design of algorithms used for solving computational problems. A number of common algorithm design paradigms and examples are presented and explained. Algorithm design issues are contemplated. Computability and computational tractability concepts are introduced. Examples of computational problems with no algorithmic solution are analyzed. The importance of time and space requirements are greatly considered as the student designs algorithms to solve computational problems.



    CECS 4208 Computer Forensics

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    The computer forensics course teaches students the basics of how a computer forensic case is carried out. The course covers the basic elements of criminology, legal theory as it applies to computer forensics, as well as the investigative process. The course teaches the necessary technical theory and practical aspects of forensic investigations. It emphasizes proper collection of evidence, proper documentation handling and information disposal procedures.



    CECS 4210 Ethical Hacking

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    This course covers the basic skill set in the area of ethical hacking. The course explains how to analyze exploits by examining and coding them, while discussing how to protect the computing infrastructure from those same attacks. It will also examine how the process of ethical hacking is carried out in a business environment.



    CECS 4212 Artificial Intelligence (AI)

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Prerequisites: ENGI 2270, CECS 3212
    The course surveys the major topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI). It begins with an overview of what constitutes AI and an introduction to intelligent agents. This is followed by a series of traditional AI topics such as logic, knowledge representation, reasoning, planning, inference using predicate calculus, heuristic and adversary search, genetic algorithms and machine learning. Other units follow on natural language processing and speech recognition.



    CECS 4214 Network Security

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    This course covers current network technologies and the methodologies used to secure them. The course provides a hands-on approach where the student will learn the theory as well as the implementation of network security technologies in a controlled environment. The course includes a “Capture the flag” simulation where students are expected to protect the infrastructure from real attacks on an isolated network.



    CECS 4216 Reverse Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    The subject of reverse software engineering is the process of analyzing binary code to create a higher-level representation of the program being examined. This is accomplished by applying reversing techniques to obtain the assembly code from the binary executable and then obtain the C/C++ structure from the recovered assembly code. The course will study the ways in which protection mechanisms have been circumvented in the past through reverse engineering and the current methods employed to protect programs from reverse engineering. The course also emphasizes the methods by which IT personnel and programmers can protect software applications from circumvention by an attacker, thereby protecting the IT infrastructure.




    CECS 4218 Introduction to Game Design

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2200, EE 1130
    This course is an introduction to the process of game design prior to game development, including the development of an idea and the production of a game design document. Topics include game elements, player motivation, game dynamics, game culture, game design team roles and game design process workflow.



    CECS 4220 E-Commerce

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3302
    This course will study the structure, organization, and use of the Internet. Internet technologies and their potential applications are examined including electronic commerce, database connectivity, and security. An emphasis will be placed on evaluating, organizing, and developing efficient models of electronic transactions and Web Information Systems.



    CECS 4222 Game Programming Fundamentals

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2222, CECS 4218
    In-depth coverage of the object-oriented architectures and software design patterns used for game design.  Students work with a game engine software framework to design and implement several kinds of games.  Additional topics include animation techniques, physics simulation, user controls, graphical methods, and intelligent behaviors.



    CECS 4226 Computer Graphics

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    The course covers the representation and manipulation of two and three-dimensional transformations, projection, illumination and shading models. The course will focus on algorithms and techniques that have emerged in the past several years. Topics include basic modeling and rendering methods; volumes and scientific visualization techniques, visual programming languages and environments, and computer animation. Also presents computer graphics as an aid in the presentation and analysis of information. Additional topics include basic graphic techniques (e.g. histograms, bar charts, pie charts), the theory of graphic presentation of information, desktop publishing software, presentation software, and graphical output devices such as: graphics monitors (EGA, CGA, VGA, RGB, composite), laser printers, computer screen projection systems, and standards.



    CECS 4228 Computational Theory

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3212
    Introduces basic concepts in computation and computability theory. The course covers formal languages, models of computation and computational complexity. Major topics include regular languages, context-free languages, decidability, reducibility, time complexity and space complexity.



    CECS 4230 Operating Systems

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Co-requisites: COE 4320 or CS 3300
    Operating systems are the programs that manage the computer hardware resources, and augment or enhance their basic functionality on behalf of the application programs that use the computer.  The course discusses various aspects of computer operating systems including processes, process scheduling, memory management, concurrent programming, deadlocks, and others.



    CECS 4234 UNIX Administration

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3234
    This course consists of an overview of the UNIX operating system and focuses on the Administrative tasks related to maintaining an UNIX based system, interconnecting UNIX with other operating systems and securing UNIX in a networked environment.  A basic knowledge of the UNIX operating is required as well as general knowledge about computer systems.  During the course the students will participate in several workshops ranging from the initial installation of an operating system to the final configuration and implementation.



    CECS 4256 Internet Programming II

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3210, CECS 3214
    Focuses on technologies used at the Server’s side for developing web applications.  Includes XML, DTD’s, XML Schemas, XSL, XSLT, and various markup languages based on these. Covers the configuration, management and development environments around major Web servers.  Tools and patterns for application of various frameworks are covered including Java Servlets, JSP, ASP, ASPX and others. An introduction and overview of advanced techniques such as Web Services, JINI, and Java Spaces is carried out when possible.



    COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES



    CS 2302 Digital Logic for Computer Science Majors

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: MATH 2310
    The course covers the following topics: digital and analog systems, binary systems, digital systems, structure and behavior, design levels, combinational and sequential systems. 



    CS 3000 Ethical & Legal Aspects of Computers

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: SOHU 2020, CECS 2200
    This course introduces students to the social, legal and moral aspects of computing, and the dilemmas that result from the evolution of computer technology. Course contents include ethical theory, decision making, professional code of ethics, “hacking” & computer crime, law enforcement, privacy and intellectual property issues, as well as environmental / health issues, and whistle blowing.



    CS 3010 Numerical Analysis for Computer
    Science Majors

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: ENGI 2270, CECS 2222
    Co-requisites: SCIE 2440, MATH 2360
    This course gives students the ability to apply solutions for approximations and errors, numerical solutions of linear and non-linear algebraic equations, ODE, PDE, numerical solutions of scientific problems, curve-fitting.



    CS 3300 Computer Architecture for Computer
    Science Majors

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 2004, CECS 3200
    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and architectural structures of computers. The basic elements of computer architecture and the conversion of assembly programming code to machine language (used to feed instructions to the processor for the optimum use of its resources) are covered in the course. Some of the topics are: procedures, string operations, bit manipulation, decimal and floating point arithmetic, registers, input/output and memory management.



    CS 4800 Computer Science Senior Project

    Four credit-hours.  One project status meeting period per week.
    Pre-requisites: CECS 3302, CECS 4204. Senior standing. Departmental permit.
    Projects will be selected in accordance with the student's area of interest. Students must approve project course with an average of C or above in order to receive the Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science from the Electrical Engineering Department.



    CS 4902 Undergraduate Research in Computer Science

    Three credit-hours.
    Pre-requisites: Fourth-year Computer Science student with 3.00 or higher GPA. Departmental Permit.
    Research study in advanced topics in areas of computer science like artificial intelligence, databases, knowledge discovery, data warehousing, computer security, distributed systems, and parallel computation, among others.  The research can be conducted in two ways: a research paper or the implementation of a project.  Each project will be evaluated observing the use of the recommended guidelines required to develop the project.



    CS 4990 Special Topics in Computer Science

    Three credit-hours.  One four-hour or two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: Departmental permit according to topics to be addressed.
    Advanced topics (3rd and 4th year level) in areas of current research in computer science. Many include topics in data mining, e-commerce, evolutionary algorithms, and data warehousing, distributed computing, computer security, human computer interaction, e-learning, knowledge.



    GENERAL ENGINERING AND SERVICE COURSES OFFERED BY THE ECECS DEPARTMENT



    ENGI 2310 Computer Programming & Algorithms

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: MATH 1350
    The students will learn the steps that lead to the possible solution to a problem.  In addition, the course presents the tools used in the development of a program.



    ENGI 2320 Principles of Electrical Engineering

    Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lectures per week.
    Pre-requisites: SCIE 1440
    Introduction to fundamental electrical engineering concepts.  Study of electrical quantities such as current, voltage, energy, and power.  Study of the ideal behavior of resistors, inductors, and capacitors as well as various independent and dependent ideal energy sources.  Introduction to basic techniques of electrical circuit analysis.

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