facebook twitter youtube


Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering applies engineering principles and design concepts together with knowledge of biology and medicine, with the aim of providing alternative or improved methods and procedures for health care, either for diagnostic or treatment purposes. As a multidisciplinary field it involves aspects of other engineering disciplines such as chemical engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering integrated with mathematics, chemistry, biology, and medicine to improve human quality of life.

Description of the Program

Biomedical Engineering applies engineering principles and design concepts together with knowledge of biology and medicine, with the aim of providing alternative or improved methods and procedures for health care, either for diagnostic or treatment purposes.

As a multidisciplinary field it involves aspects of other engineering disciplines such as chemical engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering combined with mathematics, chemistry, biology, and medicine which are integrated to improve human quality of life. Sub-disciplines in biomedical engineering are the design active and passive medical devices (pacemakers, prosthetic limbs, orthopedic implants etc.), medical imaging, biomedical signal processing, tissue and stem cell engineering, clinical engineering, and other engineering sub-specializations.

Other areas include Life Science Industry Manufacturing Processes, Hospital Facilities Maintenance, Bioinformatics, Rehabilitation and Sports Engineering. These deliver important breakthroughs that make healthcare and medicine more effective and efficient.

Degree Offered

The Biomedical Engineering program offers undergraduate instruction leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (B.S.B.M.E.). To obtain the degree the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

 

15 Credit Hours in Mathematics

16 Credit Hours in Chemistry

8 Credit Hours in Biology

10 Credit Hours in Physics

6 Credit Hours in Social Sciences

9 Credit Hours in Spanish

9 Credit Hours in English

12 Credit Hours in Engineering

54 Credit Hours in BME Core

6 Credit Hours in Tech. Electives

6 Credit Hours in Free Electives

151 Total Credit-hours

 

If the student decides to have the necessary credits to pursue further studies in a Medicine or Dental School he/she has to enroll in 3 credits of Spanish, 3 credits in English, and 6 credits in specific Socio-Humanistic courses.  The Free Electives can be used to complete the Spanish and English requirement.  The specific Socio Humanistic courses are in the areas of Economy, Psychology, Political Science, Sociology and/or Anthropology.  There are 6 credits in the program that students may choose to complete this requirement.

Mission

The Biomedical Engineering program at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico is designed to develop graduates from different backgrounds and in different locations, to cultivate their potential for leadership, productivity, competitiveness and critical thinking, through exposure to intellectual, scientific, humanistic and technological advancement, with the purpose of contributing to regional and global sustainability.

Objectives

Upon a few years of graduation, the PUPR Biomedical Engineering graduates are expected to:

  • Work with professionalism and high ethical standards as Biomedical Engineers contributing in the Life Sciences Industry, including Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices, or in the Health Care Industry, including Hospitals, Clinics, Rehabilitation and Training Centers.
  • Continue studies in Engineering or Medicine, or perform graduate studies in related disciplines.

Outcomes

Every graduating biomedical engineer from our program shall be able to:

  • Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  • Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs.
  • Function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • Understand professional and ethical responsibilities.
  • Communicate effectively.
  • Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  • Recognize the need for and engage in lifelong learning.
  • Understand contemporary engineering issues.
  • Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Enrollment

ACADEMIC YEAR ENROLLMENT
2016-2017 -

Curriculum

AREA CREDITS
Mathematics 15
Chemistry 16
Biology 8
Physics 10
Social Sciences* 6
Spanish 9
English 9
Gen. Engineering 6
Core Course 54
Tech. Electives 6
Free Electives** 6
Total 151

*  for Pre-MED in ECON or PSY

**for Pre-MED 3crds. in SPAN and 3crds. in ENGL

 

 

MATHEMATICS COMPONENT

 

(15 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

MATH 1350 Calculus I 4

 

MATH 1360 Calculus II 4

 

MATH 1370 Calculus III 3

 

MATH 3310 Differential Equations 3

 

 

 

SCIENCE COMPONENT

 

(34 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

SCIE 1130 Biology I

 

SCIE 1131 Biology I Laboratory

 

SCIE 1140 Biology II

 

SCIE 1141 Biology II Laboratory

 

SCIE 1214 General Chemistry I 4

 

SCIE 1215 General Chemistry I Laboratory 0

 

SCIE 1220 General Chemistry II 4

 

SCIE 1221 General Chemistry II Laboratory 0

 

SCIE 1230 Organic Chemistry I 4

 

SCIE 1231 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 0

 

SCIE 1240 Organic Chemistry II 4

 

SCIE 1241 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 0

 

SCIE 1430 Physics I, Mechanics 4

 

SCIE 1431 Physics I Laboratory 1

 

SCIE 1440 Physics II 4

 

SCIE 1441 Physics II Laboratory 1

 

 

 

SOCIO-HUMANISTIC STUDIES AND LANGUAGES COMPONENT

 

(18 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

SPAN 1010 Linguistic Analysis of Literary Genres 3

 

SPAN 2020 Business Spanish 3

 

ENGL 1010 The Study of the Essay as a Literary Genre 3

 

ENGL 2020 Business English 3

 

ENGL 2020 Business English and Communication 3

 

SPAN 2020 Business Spanish 3

 

 

 

SOCIO-HUMANISTIC STUDIES AND LANGUAGES PRE-MED ELECTIVES COMPONENT

 

(6 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

ECON 3010 Micro-Economics 3

 

ECON 3020 Macro-Economics 3

 

PSYC 3020 Human Development 3

 

PSYC 3040 Abnormal Psychology 3

 

PSYC 3050 Theories of Personality 3

 

 

 

ENGINEERING SCIENCES COMPONENT

 

(12 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

ENGI 2910 Engineering Mechanics, Statics and Dynamics 3

 

ENGI 3440 Thermo-Fluid Mechanics 3

 

EE 3000 Circuit Analysis I 3

 

ENGI 2270 Engineering Probability and Statistics 3

 

 

 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING COMPONENT

 

(54 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

BME 1010 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 3

 

BME 2110 Computer Aided Drafting and Design for BME 3

 

BME 3010 Computer Programming for BME 3

 

BME 3120 Biomaterials 3

 

BME 3130 Fundamentals of BioMechanics 3

 

BME 3220 Fundamentals of Electronics 3

 

BME 3140 Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems 3

 

BME 3230 Biomedical Signals and Systems 3

 

BME 3150 Life Science Industry Manufacturing Processes 3

 

BME 3020 Physiological Modeling and Control Systems 3

 

BME 3131 Fundamentals of BioMechanics Lab. 1

 

BME 4010 Rehabilitation Engineering & Industrial Automation 3

 

BME 4020 Regulations in the Life Sciences Industry 3

 

BME 3221 Biosystem Circuits and Electronics Lab 1

 

BME 4230 Bioinstrumentation 3

 

BME 4011 Rehabilitation Engineering Lab 1

 

BME 4210 Health Care Information Systems 3

 

BME 4030 Clinical Engineering 3

 

BME 4992 Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design I 3

 

BME 4994 Biomedical Engineering Capstone Design II 3

 

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES COMPONENT

 

(12 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

BME XXXX Biomedical Engineering Electives 6

 

Free Electives 6

 

MINIMUM TOTAL PROGRAM CREDIT-HOURS: 151

 

 

 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING ELECTIVE COURSES

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

 

BME 4120 Biofluid Mechanics 3

 

BME 4110 Biomechanics of Sports 3

 

BME 4130 Hospital Facilities and Maintenance 3

 

BME 4140 Medical Implants 3

 

BME 4220 Bioinformatics 3

 

BME 4240 Biomedical Data Acquisition and Analysis 3

 

BME 4250 Medical Imaging 3

 

BME 4040 Biostatistics 3

 

BME 4050: Fundamental Concepts in Biomedical Engineering 3

 

BME 4970 Biomedical Engineering Practice 3

 

BME 4980 Undergraduate Research in Biomedical Engineering 3

 

BME 4990 Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering 3

 

Curriculum Sequence

FIRST YEAR

FIRST QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 1010: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 3

SPAN 1010: Linguistic Analysis of Literary Genres 3

ENGL 1010: The study of the Essay as a Literary Genre  3

SCIE 1214: General Chemistry I 4

SCIE 1215: General Chemistry I Lab. 0

13

 

SECOND QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

SPAN 2010: Hispanic Literature 3

ENGL 2030 – Medical Terminology 3

SCIE 1130: Biology I 4

SCIE 1131: Biology I Lab 0

SCIE 1220: General Chemistry II Ch 4

SCIE 1221: General Chemistry II Lab. Ch 0

14

 

THIRD QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

MATH 1350: Calculus I 4

SCIE 1140: Biology II 3

SCIE 1141: Biology II Lab 1

SPAN 2020: Business Spanish 3

ENGL 2020: Business English and Communication 3

14

 

SECOND YEAR

FIRST QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

MATH 1360: Calculus II 4

SCIE 1230: Organic Chemistry I 4

SCIE 1231: Organic Chemistry I Lab 0

Social Science Elective: Psychology, Economics, and/or Anthropology 3

BME 2110: Computer Aided Drafting and Design for BME 3

14

 

SECOND QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

SCIE 1430 Physics I 4

SCIE 1431:  Physics I Lab 1

SCIE 1240: Organic Chemistry II 4

SCIE 1241: Organic Chemistry II Lab 0

Free Elective: (Pre-Med SPAN 2030 – Medical Terminology) 3

Math 1370: Calculus III 4

16

 

THIRD QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

SCIE 1440: Physics II 4

SCIE 1441: Physics II Lab 1

Social Science Elective: Psychology, Economics, and/or Anthropology 3

Free Elective (Pre-Med: Psychology, Economics, or Anthropology) 3

ENGI 2910: Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics Eng. 3

14

 

THIRD YEAR

FIRST QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 3010: Computer Programming for BME C 3

EE 2000: Circuit Analysis I Eng. 3

ENGI 3440: Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Eng. 3

MATH 2350: Differential Equations M 3

BME 3120: Biomaterials C 3

15

 

SECOND QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 3130: Fundamentals of Biomechanics 3

BME 3220: Fundamentals of Electronics 3

BME 3140: Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems 3

ENGI 2270: Engineering Probability and Statistics Eng. 3

12

 

THIRD QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 3230: Biomedical Signal and Systems 3

BME 3150: Life Science Industry Manufacturing Processes 3

BME 3020: Physiological Modeling and Control Systems 3

BME 3131: Fundamentals of Biomechanics Lab. 1

10

 

FOURTH YEAR

FIRST QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 4010: Rehabilitation Engineering and Industrial Automation 3

BME 4020:  Regulations in the Life Sciences Industry 3

BME 3221:  BioSystems Circuits and Electronics Lab. 1

BME 4230:  Bioinstrumentation 3

10

 

SECOND QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 4992: Capstone Design I 3

BME 4011: Rehabilitation Engineering Lab 1

BME 4210: Health Care Information Systems 3

BME 4030: Clinical Engineering 3

10

 

THIRD QUARTER

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

BME 4994: Capstone Design II C 3

BME XXXX: Technical Elective T 3

BME XXXX: Technical Elective T 3

9

Graduation Requirements

 

The Biomedical Engineering Program offers undergraduate instruction leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (B.S.B.M.E.). To earn the degree, the student must complete the following minimum requirements:

MINIMUM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

15 Credit Hours in Mathematics

16 Credit Hours in Chemistry

8 Credit Hours in Biology

10 Credit Hours in Physics

6 Credit Hours in Social Sciences

9 Credit Hours in Spanish

9 Credit Hours in English

12 Credit Hours in Engineering

54 Credit Hours in BME Core

6 Credit Hours in Tech. Electives

6 Credit Hours in Free Electives

151 Total Credit-hours

 

PREPARATORY STUDIES:

All students that are admitted to the Biomedical Engineering Program must show evidence that they have acquired the academic abilities and skills necessary to progress through this major. Those not demonstrating the complete acquisition of these abilities and skills (as reflected by the results of their College Entrance Examination Board test, results in P.U.P.R.’s placement test, previous university experience, or other tests or criteria) will be required to take preparatory courses. These courses are designed to help them overcome deficiencies in languages, mathematics, and science. These preparatory courses are in addition to the 149 credit-hours of the Biomedical Engineering Program. The preparatory courses are the following:

PREPARATORY STUDIES COMPONENT (MAXIMUM OF 33 CREDIT-HOURS)

 

COURSE TITLE CREDIT-HOURS

MATH 0102 Preparatory Mathematics 3

MATH 0106 Elementary Algebra 3

MATH 0110 Intermediate Algebra 3

MATH 1330 Pre-calculus I 3

MATH 1340 Pre-calculus II 3

SCIE 0110 Introduction to Physics 3

ATUL 0100 Adjustment to University Life 3

ENGL 0100 Preparatory English 3

ENGL 0110 English Grammar 3

SPAN 0100 Preparatory Spanish 3

SPAN 0110 Spanish Grammar 3

Course Description

 

BME 1010 – Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: None. Co-requisites: None.

This course introduces the biomedical engineering field to freshman engineering students.  The course focuses in teaching the main scopes of the profession in the medical devices industry, health care industry, and research and development.

 

BME 2110 – Computer Aided Drafting and Design for BME

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: None. Co-requisites: None.

Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD). Engineering design process: drafting, solid modeling, dimensioning, and tolerances. Graphics communication in biomedical engineering.  2D and 3D construction, visualization, sketching and standard lettering techniques using CADD.  Orthographic Projections.  Multi-view drawings for engineering design and production.  Basic Dimensioning and Tolerancing.

 

BME 3010 – Computer Programming for BME

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 2110, MATH 1350. Co-requisites: None.

This course is designed to be a first experience in computer programming and is intended for the Biomedical Engineering students. The student will learn how to design, write, and implement MATLAB scripts and subroutines to solve simple engineering problems. Topics includes MATLAB environment, selection and repetition structures, used defined functions , Data input and output, 2D Plotting and how to create simple Graphical User Interface (GUI). Students are required to complete a series of computer programming projects.

 

BME 3120 – Biomaterials

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: SCIE 1240/1241. Co-requisites: None.

This course introduces biomaterials of synthetic as well as natural origin that can be in contact with tissue, blood, and biological fluids with the intended use for prosthetic, diagnostic, therapeutic, and storage applications without adversely affecting the living organism or its components.   The course emphasizes the selection and application of biomaterials to the design of bioengineering applications.

 

BME 3130 – Fundamentals of  BioMechanics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3120, ENGI 3440. Co-requisites: None.

The mechanics of living tissue, e.g., arteries, skin, heart muscle, ligament, tendon, cartilage and bone. Constitutive equations and some simple mechanical models.  Mechanics of cells.  Applications.

 

BME 3220 – Fundamentals of Electronics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: EE 2000. Co-requisites: None.

Overview of semiconductors materials, introduction to solid state devices such as diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) and their characteristics, operation, circuits and typical applications.  The operating principles and understanding of these nonlinear devices are studied to learn their use in electronic equipment. Characteristics of the Operational Amplifier and typical applications such as inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, comparators, summing and differentiating amplifiers, and active filters are studied. Classical applications of OPAMPs in biomedical circuits are discussed.

 

BME 3140 – Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: SCIE 1140/1141, ENGI 3440, MATH 2350. Co-requisites: None.

This course introduces the integrated study of momentum, mass, and energy transfer, as well as thermodynamics and chemical reactions kinetics for the physiological and cellular processes characterization. This course is used for designing and operating medical devices and developing new therapies. Examples include kidney dialysis machines, heart-lung bypass machines, and membrane oxygenators.

 

BME 3230 – Biomedical Signal and Systems

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3220, ENGI 2270. Co-requisites: None.

This course is centered on the theory of signal and systems with focus in the analysis of signals that originate in living systems. In particular, the course emphasizes signal examples related to the human body such as ECG, EEG, EMG and others. Topics covered include Continuous-Time Signal and Systems, Discrete-Time Signal and Systems, Sampling, Fourier Analysis, z-Transform, Basic Filter Design and Spectral Analysis with applications to biomedical signals.

 

BME 3150 – Life Science Industry Manufacturing Processes

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3130, BME 3220. Co-requisites: None.

This course covers typical manufacturing processes in the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Industries.  Processes such as cleaning in place processes, automation, cnc programming, metal stampings, wiring, among others are covered.

 

BME 3020 – Physiological Modeling and Control Systems

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3130, BME 3140, BME 3220. Co-requisites: None.

A wide variety of biomedical processes behave as dynamic systems where the system states vary in time, often in response to external stimuli or interventions. The aims of this module are to introduce techniques and computer tools for modelling, predicting, analysing and understanding dynamic behavior in biomedical systems.

 

BME 3131 – Fundamentals of  BioMechanics Lab.

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3130. Co-requisite: None.

This laboratory course provides a hands-on introduction to the experimental analysis of the biomechanics of human motion. Students will learn to use computer software for data acquisition and analysis. Kinematic analysis will be performed using optoelectronic and electromagnetic motion sensors. Movement kinematics will be correlated to muscle activity data provided by electromyography (EMG). Analysis of movement kinetics will be performed using strain gauges and force sensors, including force plates for balance control experiments. The laboratory course emphasizes teamwork and communication skills through the submission of group written reports and oral presentations.

 

BME 4010 – Rehabilitation Engineering and Industrial Automation

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230, BME 3131. Co-requisites: None.

This is the application of science and technology to design, research or improve devices that enhance the independence of individuals with disabilities and their ability to work and live as normally as possible. Assistive technology is applicable to musculoskeletal and sensory disabilities.  Additionally the course includes automation and digital control of industrial applications using electrical, electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic control devices and systems.

 

BME 4020 – Regulations in the Life Sciences Industry

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3150, ENGI 2270. Co-requisites: None.

This course explores the content and interpretation of the FDA pharmaceutical and medical devices regulations. Using the regulations and warning letters the students analyze and apply their knowledge to identify trends and implications to compliance with the FDA regulations.

 

BME 3221 – BioSystems Circuits and Electronics Lab.

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3220. Co-requisite: None.

This laboratory is designed to develop in the students the necessary skills to perform electrical measurements, as well as the necessary skills for the implementation and testing of typical electronic circuits. Experimental verification of the fundamental laws of electric circuits is required for all the experiments.  Electrical measuring devices are used in this laboratory, such as the multimeter, the oscilloscope and the RLC meter, and other equipment like power supplies, function generators and breadboards, which are used in the construction and testing of electric and electronic circuits. Practical electronics circuits that contain diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers are studied and implemented. Use of computer programs to simulate the circuits to be implemented in the laboratory.

 

BME 4230 – Bioinstrumentation

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230. Co-requisites: None.

The course describes the principles, design and applications of the most used medical instruments in hospitals. Due to the rapidly change in the different model of instruments, the curse focus more on the fundamental principles of operation of those instruments that are common to all different models of these kind of instruments. The course assummes the students are familiar with differential equations, strong knowledge of phisics, and some knowledge in electric and electronic courses

 

BME 4992 – Capstone Design I

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3020, BME 4010, BME 4020. Co-requisites: None.

Teams perform a systematic design process to solve a multidisciplinary biomedical engineering problem. Weekly written and oral reports are required.

 

BME 4011 – Rehabilitation Engineering Lab

One credit-hour. One four-hour laboratory period per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4010, BME 3221. Co-requisite: None.

Laboratory experiences in Rehabilitation engineering and Industrial Automation using electrical, electronic, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems. The laboratory practices include the selection and implementation of sensors and actuators (i.e., mechanical, pneumatics and hydraulics), along to Programmable Logic Controllers and microcontrollers. The laboratory emphasizes the application of these technologies in the rehabilitation and/or improvement of the quality of life for individuals with disabilities.

 

BME 4210 – Health Care Information Systems

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4020, BME 3230. Co-requisites: None.

This course is intends to teach students how to use the information systems to program and maintain hospital information systems (HIS), computer-based patient records (CBPR), imaging, communications, standards and other related areas.

 

BME 4030 – Clinical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4230. Co-requisites: None.

This course focuses on the methodology for administering critical engineering services from facilitation of innovation and technology transfer to the performance of the technology assessment and operations support of clinics and hospitals.  Roles of the clinical engineer include supervision of clinical engineering departments, design, repair, purchase, and evaluate new and existing medical equipment, biomedical computer support, input to clinical facilities, and documentation and implementation protocols.

 

BME 4994 – Capstone Design II

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4992, BME 4011, BME 4030, BME 4210. Co-requisites: None.

Teams perform a systematic design process to solve a multidisciplinary biomedical engineering problem. Weekly written and oral reports are required.

 

ENGI 2910 – Engineering Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: MATH 1360, SCIE 1430. Co-requisites: None.

Fundamentals of statics and dynamics using vector methods in rigid body.  The course emphasizes the application of Newton’s laws, analysis of force systems. Law of equilibrium for rigid body, kinematics and kinetics, angular kinetics and kinematics, work, energy and momentum of rigid bodies.

 

BME TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

BME 4120:  Biofluid Mechanics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3130. Co-requisites: None.

This course is designed to study fluid mechanics applied in the biological flows. Students will gain understanding of the basic fluid governing equations in addition to blood rheology and disease. Mathematical models will be used to simulate flows in the cardiovascular, circulatory, and respiratory system. This class includes drug delivery in the human body through different systems.

 

BME 4110:  Biomechanics of Sports

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3131. Co-requisites: None.

Anatomical and mechanical bases of physical activity with emphasis on the analysis of sport and exercise skills.  This course focuses upon the development of techniques of human movement analysis from structural and functional points of view and incorporates principles of mechanics as they apply to the analysis of human motion.  Examples will be drawn from joint movements and sport skills to illustrate these types of analyses.   Applications to baseball swing/pitching, boxing punch, soccer kicking among other will be analyzed.

 

BME 4130:  Hospital Facilities and Maintenance

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4030. Co-requisites: None.

This course presents an introduction to the principles of design, and maintain medical gas, energy and power supply systems used in hospitals such as water, gas, vacuum and steam systems, air-conditioning units, heat exchangers and electric generators.

 

BME 4140:  Medical Implants

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4020. Co-requisites: None.

This course introduces the most relevant and important concepts of medical implants.  Therapeutic instrumentation, such as pacemakers, defibrillators and prosthetic devices, will be reviewed considering the area of placement, the duration of the implant, the safety and efficacy.  Each medical implant studied includes an exposition of appropriate physiology, mathematical modeling or biocompatibility issues, as well as clinical need.

 

BME 4220:  Bioinformatics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4210. Co-requisites: None.

The course introduces the student to the bioinformatics field that consists on leveraging computer resources to analyze complex and vast amount of biological data. The course brings together the field of computer science, biology, and mathematics to analyze the DNA, RNA, Protein structure, and metabolic pathways. This information can then be used in applied fields such as Drug discovery among other.

 

BME 4240:  Biomedical Data Acquisition and Analysis

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4011. Co-requisites: None.

The course covers the topics such as basic sensors in biomedical engineering, biological signal measurement and conditioning, data acquisition and data analysis. The students will learn the techniques of collecting biological signals using basic sensors. The student must need a previous course that cover digital signal processing and filtering analog signals in other to using simulation software as Mathlab and Labview in their class room projects.

 

BME 4250:  Medical Imaging

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230, BME 3131. Co-requisites: None.

The course gives an introduction to two-dimensional signal and systems with focus in the enhancement of biomedical images acquired from human subjects. In particular, the course emphasizes image acquisition techniques and enhancement for biomedical images extracted through Ultrasound imaging, X-Ray imaging, Gamma-Ray imaging, CT-Scans, MRI and other techniques. Topics covered include, Image Enhancement in the Spatial Domain and in the Frequency Domain.

 

BME 4040: Biostatistics

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 4020. Co-requisites: None.

This course introduces the student to selected topics in biostatistics concepts. Descriptive statistics and graph to analyze variability in data; hypothesis testing to perform inference on population means and proportions using sample data; hypothesis testing to comparison means and proportions; correlation and simpler linear regression concepts will be essential on the analysis of integrated systems, processes or components.

 

BME 4050: Fundamental Concepts in Biomedical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: SCIE 1240, SCIE 1440. Co-requisites: None.

This course focuses on the study of miscellaneous important concepts and principles emphatically necessary for pre-medical students and highly recommended for biomedical engineering students. It covers essential topics in applied biology and organic and inorganic chemistry. The course emphasize in the study of compounds of biological importance such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Special attention is placed on structure and function of these biopolymers and their constituents as well as the principles of bioenergetics and fuel molecules metabolism and the transmission of genetic information; it also covers enzyme catalysis, including mechanistic considerations, kinetics, models of enzyme-substrate interaction, and regulation.

 

BME 4970: Biomedical Engineering Practice

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230, BME 3131, Director/Coordinator Consent. Co-requisites: None.

Perform a systematic design process to solve a biomedical engineering problem. Weekly written and oral reports are required.

 

BME 4980: Undergraduate Research in Biomedical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230, BME 3131, Director/Coordinator Consent. Co-requisites: None.

Perform a systematic design process to solve a biomedical engineering problem. Weekly written and oral reports are required.

 

BME 4990: Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering

Three credit-hours. Two two-hour lecture periods per week. Pre-requisite: BME 3230, BME 3131, Director/Coordinator Consent. Co-requisites: None.

Arranged by individual faculty with special expertise, these courses survey fundamentals in areas that are not covered by the regular Biomedical engineering course offerings.  Exact course descriptions are disseminated by the Biomedical Engineering Office well in advance of the offering.  Courses may be in Tissue Engineering, Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering, Multiphysics Simulations of Biological Systems, and Continuous Improvement in Healthcare.

Laboratories

The facilities and laboratories of the Biomedical Engineering Department at PUPR provide students with hands on experience on several important areas such as Computer Aided Design, Computer Programming, Biomechanics, Biosystem Circuits and Electronics, and the Rehabilitation and Industrial Automation Laboratories. The Biomedical engineering experimental facilities are housed in the fourth floor of the Pabellón building. In addition to this, chemistry, physics, electronics and computers laboratories are also available to our students throughout the campus.