Polytechnic University Graduate School

Manufacturing Engineering

Overview:

The Master Program in Manufacturing Engineering distinguishes itself by its depth and focus in state of the art technology. It seeks to prepare engineers for managerial positions and responsibilities in manufacturing organizations. The program offers the opportunity to specialize in the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector. It also offers the opportunity to specialize in the field of Industrial Automation, and Quality Management to serve a wide rage of manufacturing companies.

The program of study allows graduates to gain a deep knowledge in current and new manufacturing technologies, regulatory issues affecting manufacturing, decision making tools, as well as a broad knowledge in key aspects regarding the operation and management of a high technology industry. Such knowledge will prepare them to assume important positions within manufacturing companies either in Puerto Rico, the U.S. or abroad.

Professionals graduating from the Master Program in Manufacturing Engineering include engineers from the traditional disciplines such as industrial, electrical, mechanical, and chemical engineering among other disciplines.

Graduate Profile:

- Admission Requirements

Students with undergraduate preparation in industrial, electrical, mechanical, chemical, and other engineering programs are encouraged to apply for admission. Admission to the Master‟s program is based on total academic and professional achievement. Applicants must have completed his/her Bachelor's degree at an accredited university with a minimum general Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.75/4.00.

All entering students should have: a) completed a one-term course in Probability and Statistics; b) demonstrated proficiency to work with computer application programs such as electronic spreadsheets, presentation programs, and word processing.

Students with deficiencies in these prerequisites are required to take courses in these areas and earn a grade of C or better. These requirements must be fulfilled as early as possible in the student's program. Courses taken to remedy deficiencies cannot be used to fulfill course requirements for the Master's degree.

- Degree Offered

Students in the Graduate Program in Manufacturing Engineering may pursue their Master‟s degree according to two alternatives. The first one leads to the Master of Science degree. Through this alternative students are required to complete a thesis. The second alternative leads to the Master of Engineering degree. In this alternative students must prepare a design project.

Curricular Sequence

The structure and sequence of the curriculum include blocks of courses classified as Core, Area of Specialization, Elective and Thesis/Design Project.

Core Courses

This block of courses provides the fundamental knowledge in current and new manufacturing technologies, decision making tools, as well as a thorough knowledge in all the aspects regarding the operation and management of high-technology manufacturing industries. The core courses total 12 credit-hours, distributed among 4 courses, three credits each. As part of the core courses, all students must take the Business Writing and Presentation Skills Seminar. This is a 0 credit-hours seminar whose major purpose is to develop student‟s skills in preparing technical reports and making presentations using modern technology.

Area of Specialization

All students may select from three areas of specialization: Pharmaceutical Processes, Industrial Automation, or Quality Management. Through these areas, students may gain fundamental knowledge in current and innovative manufacturing technologies of the industry in their specialized courses.

Elective Courses

Through this block of courses students may select courses of their interest with the purpose of rounding their graduate education in those areas of their concern. The total number of credit-hours in elective courses varies depending on the degree option selected. For the Master of Science degree, students must take a minimum of 6 credit-hours in elective courses. For the Master of Engineering degree the minimum is 9 credit-hours in elective courses. The total number of credit-hours is distributed among courses of 3 credit-hours each.

Thesis/Design Project

Students must select one of two options: preparing a thesis based on an applied research topic; or preparing a design project in a topic intimately related to their specialized courses.

Manufacturing Engineering - Flowchart - PDF Format

Faculty

  • De Cárdenas, Lourdes – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Chemistry, Purdue University, 1986; B.S., Chemistry, University of Puerto Rio, Río Piedras, 1981.
  • Dávila Aponte, Edwin – Assistant Professor – Ph.D., Entrepreneurship Development, Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 2006; MBA Accounting, Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, 1999; BBA., Accounting, Caribbean University, Bayamón, Puerto Rico, 1986.
  • Encarnación, Lourdes – Lecturer III, Ed.D., Education, Interamerican University, 2000; M.ED., English, University of Puerto Rico, 1980; B.A., English, University of Puerto Rico, 1977.
  • González Lizardo, Angel – Associate Professor, Director Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, University of Dayton, OH, 2003; M.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez,1994; B.S., Electrical Engineering, Universidad del Zulia, Venezuela, 1984.
  • González, Clara – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997; M.S., Industrial Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, 1991; B.S., Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, 1988.
  • González Miranda, Carlos – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, North Carolina State University, 1995; M.I.M.S.E., Manufacturing Systems Engineering, North Carolina State University, 1990; B.S., Industrial Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, 1987.
  • Jordán Conden, Zayira – Associate Professor, Ph.D., Human Computer Interaction, Iowa State University, 2010; M.A., Antropology, Iowa State University, 2004; B.A., Journalism, Iowa, State University, 2001.
  • López Bonilla, Román – Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Bradford, England, 1990; M.S., Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada BC, Mexico, 1981; B.S., Electrical Engineering, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico, 1977.
  • Nieves, Rafael – Associate Professor, Pharm.D., Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, 2005; M.S., Pharmaceutical Sciences (Medicinal Chemistry), University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences, 1997; B.S., Pharmacy, University of Puerto Rico, 1993.
  • Pabón González, Miriam – Associate Professor, Dean Graduate School, Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 2001; P.E., 2002; M.E.M., Engineering Management, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1995; B.S., Industrial Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, 1990.
  • Pesante Santana, José A. – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1997; M.S., Industrial Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1990; B.S., Industrial Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, 1989.
  • Pons Fontana, Carlos – Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Psychology, Universidad Carlos Albizu, 2004; M.E.M., Engineering Management, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1994; P.E., 1989; B.S., Industrial Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 1986; M.S., Psychology, Universidad Carlos Albizu, 1975; B.A., Psychology, University of Puerto Rico, 1972.
  • Rivera Cruz, Aida – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Industrial Organizational Psychology, Caribbean Center for Advanced Studies, 1991; M.S., Industrial Organizational Psychology, Caribbean Center for Advanced Studies, 1987; B.A., Business Administration, University of Puerto Rico, 1976.
  • Rodríguez Pérez, José – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Biology, University of Granada, 1989; B.S., Biology, University of Granada, 1984.
  • Torres, Edgar – Lecturer III, Ph.D., Pharmacy, University of Sciences, Philadelphia; M.E., Manufacturing Engineering, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, 2002; B.S., Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, 1998.

Contact Information

Rafael Nieves, Pharm.D.
Manufacturing Engineering
Graduate Program Coordinator
E-mail: rnieves@pupr.edu
Phone: 787 622-8000 x. 349

Laboratories

The Industrial Engineering Department offers students the opportunity to receive hands on experience to practice the concepts and techniques learned in the classroom allowing them the best opportunity to acquire current knowledge and the expertise that industry demands. In order to fulfill this commitment, these laboratories have been designed to cover all major areas of Industrial Engineering. The Industrial Engineering Department has the following laboratory facilities on campus: Human Factors Laboratory, Methods Engineering and Work Measurement Laboratory, Operations Management Laboratory, and Software Instruction Laboratory. These laboratories have been designed to perform a wide range of experiments in each of the areas of interest.

Human Factors Laboratory - This laboratory was designed to provide students the opportunity to carry out practical experiments concerning anthropometry, noise and illumination, work-station design, manual material handling, biomechanics and other areas of human performance evaluation and machine-human interactions for the workstation design. The laboratory includes adjustable workstations, ergonomic equipment, soundproof cabins, sound level meters, light meters, goniometers and push/pull gauges.

Methods Engineering and Work Measurement Laboratory - This laboratory was designed to provide students the opportunity to carry out practical experiments concerning motion and time studies techniques (Stopwatch, Work Sampling and Predetermined Time), workstation design, method improvement, performance rating, allowance factor and learning curve. The laboratory includes Time Study equipment such as: Stopwatch, Random Reminder, MTM equipment and tables, assembly‟s parts and computer to download manufacturing assemblies and for the utilization of statistical software for time-study data analysis and design software for workstation improvements.

Operations Management Laboratory - This laboratory consists of a Windows 2000 network with twenty (20) Intel Pentium III personal computers for student use. This network offers the student the opportunity to access specialized software to tackle manufacturing problems. This laboratory has the equipment and software required to develop the system analysis, solutions development and decision-making skills in our students. The hardware available in this laboratory includes twenty personal computers, and a laser printer. The software in the network includes AutoCAD 2002, Statgraphics Plus for Windows, Witness Simulation software, FactoryCad and FactoryFlow, Microsoft Project, Power Point, Word, Excel, Microsoft Visio and other relevant software.

Software Instruction Laboratory - This laboratory is a state-of-the-art facility. It provides seating for 20 students and has been designed specially for teaching purposes. This room is also equipped with computer lab instruction software to provide one-on-one instruction. It consists of a Microsoft 2000 network with twenty Gateway Pentium IV personal computers and a LCD projector. This network offers the faculty the opportunity to teach software-related courses in order to solve manufacturing problems. The different software available in the network includes Statgraphics plus for windows, Witness and Arena simulation Software, Microsoft Project, MS Visio and other relevant software.